Share Our Blog Posts

Stay up-to-date of diverse aging issues by regularly visiting our unique blog. We are diverse older adults who are experts on our lives. We are also advocates, community leaders and aging professionals with valuable insights and experiences to help you better understand the aging world and the policies that shape older people in the United States.

Quality of Life Enhanced for Seniors with Companion Animals

by D. Kevin McNeir. This article originally appeared in the Washington Informer

Much has been reported about a paradigm shift within American society which looms on the horizon and cannot be ignored: In less than 20 years, according to U.S. Census data, older adults will outnumber children for the first time in our history. On reaching that milestone in 2035, experts predict, the 78 million older Americans 65 or more will slightly outnumber the 76.7 million children under 18.

Most of these seniors will be women, who have longer life expectancies than men and who will more than likely live at home with the assistance of family caregivers. The majority of the seniors will be baby.... Read More

             

States Need Pragmatic Policy Solutions to Better Support Family Caregivers

by Rani Snyder, Program Director, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This blog originally appeared on The John A. Hartford Foundation website.

Dear Colleagues—

At JAHF we want to know how we can better support family caregivers—the nearly 18 million family members in the United States who provide care to older people who need assistance. They are often invisible members of our health care system who receive little preparation, training, or support. They make it possible for older adults to live in their homes, rather than an institutional setting, for as long as possible—which is what 87%.... Read More

             

Elder Refugees In Kentucky At Risk for Hunger

by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part one of a three part series; you can read part one here and read part two here.

Feeding Kentucky, a nonprofit with a mission to alleviate hunger across the Bluegrass State, reports that food insecurity is a reality for one in 10 residents age 60 and older.

Elder refugees

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

in Kentucky face an ever higher risk of hunger due to language barriers and lack of transportation.

On a recent rainy afternoon in Louisville,.... Read More

             

HRC and SAGE Announce Partnership on First-Ever Assessment of Care Facilities Serving Older LGBTQ People

This press release originally appeared on the SAGE website.

Yesterday, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) civil rights organization, and SAGE, the world’s largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBTQ older adults, announced a historic partnership to fundamentally improve the experiences of LGBTQ older adults as they seek long-term care and services.

A centerpiece of the effort will be the Long-Term Care Equality Index (LEI), the first-ever nationwide assessment of how long-term care facilities are treating.... Read More

             

NICOA Joins 2019 Aging in America Conference

by Kayla Sawyer

The National Indian Council on Aging, Inc. (NICOA) will travel to New Orleans for the 2019 Aging in America conference on April 15-18 to learn best practices and gain insights from leaders in the field about the current state of aging in America. Join nearly 3,000 professionals to discuss a multitude of issues affecting older adults as well as the latest policies and trends.

According to the American Society on Aging, the conference will have “a strong focus on critical and emergent topics facing the field of aging, as well as cutting-edge and responsive programmatic, research, policy and advocacy efforts.” Topics will include social isolation, emergency and disaster readiness, housing.... Read More

             

Grandfamilies Cut Across Class and Ethnic Groups, Particularly Prevalent Among African Americans

Caregiving provided by grandparents serves as a safety net for children in need of parenting regardless of race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. Approximately 2.9 million grandparents make breakfast, organize their grandchildren’s activities, arrange doctor’s appointments, help with homework, and worry about how they are going to afford college coupled with their everyday household expenses.

Since the 1970s, the number of grandparents raising grandchildren in the United States has rapidly increased. Sometimes grandparent caregiving is a formal arrangement, including foster care or adoption. Many times, grandparent caregiving is an informal arrangement that might occur in a multi-generational home or take place outside of the family home due to social conditions such as addiction, incarceration, child abuse, neglect, and even the death.... Read More

             

Come see “Toilet Talks,” a play about eldercare, in Indianapolis next week!

In November of 2017, we met Betty (she/her/hers) and liz thomson (they/them/theirs) through the interview on November 20, 2017. They had just moved in together that fall and were adjusting to their new apartment in Greenwood, Indiana. Liz, who is an adoptee and identifies as bi/queer and gender non-conforming, interviewed Mom to get her thoughts on how the new situation was going. In September of 2018, Mom passed away and left liz with the logistics that follow a death, but also a deeply unexpected void in their life. Trying to cope in a healthy way, liz wrote Toilet Talks, a semi-fictional play about their elder care experience. Toilet Talks will be a.... Read More

             

Louisville Program for Elder Refugees Is A Buffer Against Isolation

by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part two of a three part story; read part one here and read part three here.

When elder refugees arrive in America they leave behind violence or religious persecution, as well as family, culture and their native language. A program in Louisville, Kentucky helps refugees who are 60 and older transition to American life and avoid isolation.

This is a protection against isolation – a social hall alive with music that inspires clapping and dancing among refugees in their 60s, 70s, 80s and early 90s. It’s part of the Louisville Refugee Elder Program that serves arrivals.... Read More

             

Factors that Worsen Cancer in Diverse Communities

Cancer remains one of the most dangerous diseases that affects millions of people. It is projected by 2020 that the leading cause of death in the United States will transition from heart disease to cancer. In some of our diverse communities, this transition has already happened. For both Asian American and Latinx communities, cancer is the leading cause of death. Similarly, African Americans are also significantly affected by cancer with 200 deaths per 100,000 African Americans. The effects of cancer in our diverse communities become even more alarming when examining individual cancers, such as breast cancer or prostate cancer. Breast.... Read More

             
Page 5 of 76« First...34567...102030...Last »