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Stay up-to-date of diverse aging issues by regularly visiting our unique blog. We are diverse older adults who are experts on our lives. We are also advocates, community leaders and aging professionals with valuable insights and experiences to help you better understand the aging world and the policies that shape older people in the United States.

Learning and Teaching at the 2018 NICOA Conference on Aging in Indian Country

This week, the Diverse Elders Coalition will be participating in the 2018 NICOA Conference on Aging in Indian Country, learning and teaching alongside Tribal Elders, advocates, and service organizations at the Pechanga Resort and Casino in Temecula, CA. The 2018 Conference — NICOA’s 21st conference since the organization was founded in 1976 — will be the second that I’ve been a part of after traveling to Niagara Falls for the 2016 event. I’m looking forward to connecting with our friends and partners at NICOA as well the 1000+ other advocates and Elders who will be in attendance.

NICOA’s conferences tend to be really special events, with a Tribal fashion show, traditional foods served at.... Read More

             

Older Black Workers Face Higher Risk of Layoff

by Kyle Moore and Teresa Ghilarducci

After 11 years of economic expansion, the difference in unemployment rates between black and white older workers is at a historic low—just 1.1 percentage points apart. Black work­ers usually suffer from much higher rates of unemployment than whites, so the small gap between the two racial groups is good news (the gap between black and white men is usually larger than the gap between black and white women—for this period the men’s gap was 1.5 per­centage points, while the women’s gap was just .7 of a percentage point). But the good news about a small racial unemployment rate gap likely is temporary, and history shows the racial gap in job­lessness will grow in the next.... Read More

             

What’s At Stake In Trump Promise To Roll Back ACA Nondiscrimination Rule?

by Lois Uttley. This article originally appeared on the Community Catalyst blog.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a groundbreaking nondiscrimination provision known as Section 1557, or the “Health Care Rights Law,” which serves as the first federal law to prohibit sex discrimination in health care. Section 1557 is critical to protecting women and LGBTQ individuals from discrimination in health care. Unfortunately, Section 1557 is not immune from ongoing efforts to sabotage the ACA: The Trump Administration indicated that it intends to roll back or repeal parts of the rule that the Obama administration issued in 2016 implementing Section 1557.

What is Section 1557 and how did the Obama rule interpret it?

Section 1557 of the ACA.... Read More

             

The Coming Generational Diversity in the Workforce

While most of Congress is in recess during the month of August, the conference circuit is in full swing. Hot off the heels of n4a’s 43rd Annual Conference & Tradeshow at the beginning of the month, Dr. Eun Jeong Lee, National Asian Pacific Center on aging (NAPCA) Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) National Director, will again partner with national SCSEP grantees to discuss best practices of the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) in serving mature workers and how generational diversity benefits employers.

Dr. Lee and partners are attending the 2019 National Home & Community Based Services (HCBS) Conference in Baltimore this week, sponsored by the National Association.... Read More

             

Reframing Aging: “Let’s include younger generations in this conversation instead of competing against them”

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The Reframing Aging Thought Leaders Roundtable is an initiative of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). The second of three 2018 roundtables was held in New Mexico. “Using our national platform, we have been working to transform the negative perceptions of Hispanic older adults in the US; it is not an issue affecting just Latinos, but older adults in general,” was just of the highlights from Dr. Yanira Cruz, President of NHCOA, during her keynote address.

“Our commitment to older adults is to contribute.... Read More

             

Immigrant elders find relief with affordable housing in NYC, but feel isolated from community

This article originally appeared on the India Home blog.

Nurul Khan and his wife Farida Begum are an older Bengali couple from Queens who lived for 30 years in damp basement apartments in Jamaica, Queens.

“It was so damp I got arthritis,” Farida Begum said to visitors recently. “The basement was freezing.”

The visitors were in Farida Begum’s brand new apartment on 96th Avenue. Tiny and spry, the 58 year old rushed about the apartment getting us snacks and making chai on her brand new stovetop.

“I never saw the sun for all those years. My body used to ache.... Read More

             

New Report Identifies Unique Challenges for LGBT Community Facing Alzheimer’s and Other Dementias

LGBT and Dementia – a new issues brief developed by the Alzheimer’s Association and SAGE outlines the unique challenges facing LGBT older adults living with Alzheimer’s and other dementias and their caregivers. The brief outlines the unique issues that arise when Alzheimer’s disease, sexual orientation, and gender identification and expression intersect, allowing advocates and care providers to better meet the needs of LGBT elders and their caregivers facing dementia.

“Living with Alzheimer’s or another dementia is not easy for anyone,” said Sam Fazio, Ph.D., director of quality care and psychosocial research, Alzheimer’s Association. “But LGBT individuals can often face additional challenges that need to be considered and addressed to ensure this population.... Read More

             

The View From Down Here

This article was originally published in A&U Magazine.

Around the first of April of this year, I began using a wheelchair when I leave the apartment. This was an inevitability that I resisted, fought off for as long as I could. Admitting that I need a wheelchair struck me as “the last straw,” akin to simply giving up, accepting the fact that the virus is winning. Worse, I have become more of a burden to my fiancé Rick than a companion. (When he read a draft of this column, Rick balked at my thinking I’m a burden on him and assured me that I’m not. He’s a good man that way.)

However, between the debilitating pain in.... Read More

             
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