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Stay up-to-date of diverse aging issues by regularly visiting our unique blog. We are diverse older adults who are experts on our lives. We are also advocates, community leaders and aging professionals with valuable insights and experiences to help you better understand the aging world and the policies that shape older people in the United States.

SEARAC 2020 Census: Voices from the Vietnamese Community

This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

Luke Kertcher
ESL Teacher, Aldine Independent School District
Houston, TX

Back in March as part of #StatsinSchools week, SEARAC Census Ambassador (and former intern) Luke Kertcher, an ESL teacher based in Texas, designed a scavenger hunt and trivia activity about the census. “We were able to learn and discuss more about why the census is important, especially for our immigrant and refugee communities,” he said. “I also distributed flyers in my students’ home languages—Spanish and.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

PHI Launches ‘The National Direct Care Workforce Resource Center’

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

A new online resource aims to strengthen the evidence base on the direct care workforce by gathering and centralizing the various studies, reports, and other resources that have been published about these workers—and by supporting leaders across disciplines in filling the knowledge gaps on this workforce.

As the country’s largest online library of information on direct care workers, The National Direct Care Workforce Center will support researchers, policymakers, practitioners, advocates, and journalists in better understanding—and building the knowledge base on—this critical workforce of 4.5.... Read More

             

Aging Out Loud: From Generation to Generation

by Renée Markus Hodin. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

We want to pay tribute to a leader with whom many Health Policy Hub readers may not be familiar: Nelson Cruikshank. Nelson was a longtime leader in the labor movement who was instrumental in creating two of the most important programs for vulnerable older adults and people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare.

Born in 1902, Nelson grew up to become a Methodist minister and, later, a union organizer. After a series of jobs in the federal government – including one setting up camps for migrant farm workers, a program later made famous in John Steinbeck’s novel, The Grapes of.... Read More

             

Riots Before Parades: LGBT Pride Month

There are many ways to write the story of the LGBT civil rights movement. We can start in the 1920s, when the Society of Human Rights was founded, or in 1955 when the Mattachine Society, a secretive group was founded, or with the 1965 gay march in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The LGBT community has been fighting for their civil rights for decades; however, it wasn’t until the 1968 Stonewall Riots that issues facing the LGBT community attracted mass media attention in the US.

The Stonewall Riots ignited unity between many different LGBT groups to take.... Read More

             

Join us! Celebrate Pride In Place

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

SAGE is proud to introduce #PrideInPlace, our virtual Pride campaign for 2020. Pride in Place is a way to celebrate Pride and the 50th anniversary of our country’s first Pride March wherever you are, whether it’s a physical location, your place in life, your place in the community, or your place in the history of the movement. This is an affirmation – no matter where you are or what is going on in the world, pride is a state of mind, and will continue to flourish against all odds.

Resources:

View our Pride in Place social.... Read More
             

COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one.... Read More

             
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