Science moved at unprecedented speed to develop vaccines against the new coronavirus. It was too fast for some Latinos—especially those egged on my myth and misinformation.

By Jenny Manrique. This article originally appeared on Palabra.

Read in Spanish and see the video in Spanish with English subtitles: https://www.palabranahj.org/archive/contra-vacuna

On the ranch where Gabriela Navarrete was raised in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, she learned early on that the land could provide what she needed to cure her ills. Mesquite bark, olive oil, corn vinegar and baking soda were useful for treating everything from joint pains to throat infections. In case of indigestion, the medicine was a good old stomach rub.

Navarrete, 69, passed on to her three daughters and one son the lesson that “everything natural is what is good for the body.”

So when the COVID-19 pandemic began, she quickly stocked up.... Read More

             

Vaccination Rates Among American Indians

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Immunization against childhood diseases is regarded as one of the greatest public health achievements in the United States and worldwide. The benefit of vaccinations has been particularly notable for American Indian and Alaska Native people, who have suffered disproportionately from infectious diseases compared with the general U.S. population. Vaccination coverage among American Indian children is higher than national coverage levels for most vaccines. This finding contrasts with overall coverage estimates among all American Indians, which usually are slightly below national coverage levels.

From 2006 to 2010, CDC researchers reported that although disparities existed between white and American Indian and Alaska Native populations in 2001 to 2004, the findings from the latest surveys showed.... Read More