COVID-19 and transplant patients

By NHCOA Media. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Although it is not known exactly if COVID-19 will be more severe in transplant patients, it is known that the disease is frequently more severe in people with weak immune systems—which includes transplant patients. Immunosuppressants are drugs that weaken the immune system to reduce the chance that the body will reject the transplanted organ. However, it is more difficult for a weakened immune system to fight an infection.

The best way to stay healthy if you receive immunosuppressive treatment is to avoid being exposed to the virus. Continue to practice daily preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick, such as:

Avoid close contact with people.... Read More
             

Lessons learned during the pandemic

By: Yanira Cruz, MPH, DrPH,.  This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

On April 29, 2021, NHCOA partnered with AARP to present the “Lessons Learned from the Pandemic and a Look at the Future” virtual town hall. Featuring speakers from Justice in Aging, the National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA), the National Caucus and Center on Black Aging (NCBA), the Southeast Asian Resource Action Center (SEARAC), and Services & Advocacy for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Elders (SAGE), the town hall was used to highlight the inequities exacerbated by COVID-19 and how these groups addressed needs and challenges in their respective communities.

Many of the groups represented in the town hall have tragically had to witness disproportionate.... Read More

             

Why shouldn’t I postpone the appointment for my second dose of the vaccine?

This article originally appeared in Spanish on the NHCOA blog.

In the United States, more than 40% of adults have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, however, most approved COVID-19 vaccines require two doses to provide a level of adequate protection.

Delaying a second dose of the vaccine could put people at risk for any of the new variants and “are dangerously vulnerable to infection with variants that weaken the effects of antibodies,” according to recent statements by Dr. Anthony Faucci, chief epidemiologist. of the White House.

Another dangerous point is that, when receiving the first dose, and not returning for the second, the person runs the risk of being left with a false sense of security. You may even mistakenly.... Read More

             

Getting older with HIV

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. It is also available in Spanish.

Every day, the number of older people living with HIV in the country and in the world increases. One reason is because treatments have improved and are helping people with the disease live longer. In the United States, almost half of the people with HIV are 50 years of age or older, many of whom were diagnosed with the virus when they were younger.

Yet thousands of older people get HIV each year, and most are less likely to be tested than younger people, so they may not know they have HIV. The signs of HIV / AIDS can be confused with the aches and pains of.... Read More

             

How to be a long-distance caregiver?

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the health precaution it brought with it, have now also required remote caregiving to also became an essential part of some people’s daily routine. Meeting or visiting someone is now more complicated and is not recommended because it could endanger the health of everyone involved, especially if the person receiving care is an older adult. Therefore, long-distance caregiving has taken more prominence as a solution in this current situation.

It is necessary to emphasize that long distance caregivers, in most cases, need the help of a primary or full-time caregiver, who is in charge of caring for the older adult, especially if they are caring for a.... Read More

             

The need to expand clinical trials to include communities of color

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Health care must always meet the best standards in order to care for the population, and this can only be achieved through informed and accurate decision-making based on the results of health studies. Health care requires clinical research to find new and better treatments for diseases such as diabetes, cancer, heart conditions, etc.

Research ensures that treatments and medicines are based on scientific evidence and it ensures the safety and effectiveness of drugs. Clinical trials and research participants should be representative of the diversity of the country’s demographics, however, data show that some communities are often left out of health research.

When we look at health research on diseases that disproportionately.... Read More

             

Celebrating the resilience of the Hispanic community facing adversity

This article originally appeared in Spanish and English on the NHCOA blog to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Over the years, many Hispanic communities have faced various disparities in the United States. However, thanks to hard work, perseverance and courage of our people, today more than ever, Latino voices resonate in the struggle for a diverse, just and free country for all. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age,” that means, all of these elements contribute to a person’s health status. These determinants of health greatly define the differences in the quality of life experienced by different groups and if these disparities.... Read More