What is Caregiver Burnout?

By NHCOA. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The caregiver syndrome refers to those people who suffer physical, psychological, and general health exhaustion due to the constant and continuous care of a patient.

Caregiver burnout—also known as caregiver stress or caregiver syndrome—was first described by the American psychologist Herbert Freudenberger in 1974. The mental health professional worked in a clinic for drug addicts in New York and observed that most of the volunteers at the clinic had a progressive loss of energy, leading to exhaustion, symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as lack of motivation at work and aggressiveness with patients after a year of working.

This is a disorder with serious implications both physically.... Read More

             

Diversifying Research on COVID-19 and Aging-Related Issues: A Call for Asian American and Pacific Islander Older Adults and Caregivers to Participate in COMPASS and CARE

By Frances Huynh and Dyanna Chung. This article originally appeared in NAPCA’s media center.

2020 was an incredibly challenging year for most people because of the coronavirus pandemic outbreak. One significant thing that we have learned is that older adults are at a higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness and death. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that 8 out of 10 Covid-19 deaths reported in United States have been among adults age 65 years old and older. Despite the high death rates, there is still a lack of information and data on Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) older adults, which is important in assessing the health impact of COVID-19 on these populations. Additionally, since.... Read More

             

Navigating Mental Health as a Khmer Social Worker

By Nary Rath. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog

My mom arrived to the United States in 1983 fleeing from war and genocide to seek refuge. She was 21 years old when she started a new life in Ohio and then set roots in Connecticut, where she raised my older sister and me. Rebuilding her life in this country has led to opportunities never imaginable for my family in Cambodia, but the exposure to pre- and post-migration trauma continues to be felt by entire communities of Southeast Asian Americans (SEAAs).

Surviving genocide, long-term exposure to violence, displacement, and anti-immigrant racism in the United States are all factors that contribute to the high prevalence of mental health issues.... Read More

             

Open Up Puerto Rico – Exprésate Puertorriqueños

This article originally appeared on the SAGE website. To learn more about Open Up Puerto Rico, click here.

SAGE is proud to partner with the New York City Department for the Aging, Thrive NYC and our SAGE Puerto Rico affiliate at Waves Ahead in a public health campaign for Puerto Rican LGBT elders in New York City and Puerto Rico. The campaign seeks to provide help via SAGE’s National LGBT Elder Hotline in the U.S. and a telephone helpline in Puerto Rico run by SAGE Puerto Rico at Waves Ahead.

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Stay Connected While Social Distancing

by Roslyn Daniels. This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

People all over the world, including Americans, are practicing social distancing during this coronavirus pandemic. We’re sheltering at home, leaving only when necessary to replenish essential supplies or to get in a little exercise. 

Yes, it feels strange, this interruption to our lives and regular routines, but everyone who can stay home should; it saves lives and helps halt the spread of the virus. 

We’re not, however, blind to a byproduct of all this enforced separation: loneliness. A survey.... Read More

             

Self-Care During the Covid-19 Outbreak

By Michelle Fritsch, PharmD, BCGP, BCACP, and Kathleen Cameron, BS Pharm, MPH. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging (NCOA) blog.

As we’re all navigating a lot of uncertainty, upsetting news, isolation, and grief, all of the self-care activities that were important for staying healthy before the pandemic may be even more critical now. Even though there is a lot of emphasis on COVID-19 right now, your overall health is just as important as any other time. The better controlled your chronic conditions, the better you’ll be able to fight the virus.... Read More

             

Elder Mental Health in the Time of COVID-19

by Dr. Octavio N. Martinez, Jr., Executive Director, Hogg Foundation for Mental Health. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. Para leer en español, haga clic aquí.

COVID-19 is caused by something so small we cannot even see it, a virus known as SARS-CoV-2.  This virus is causing illness and death throughout the world; and it seems to be targeting our elders especially hard.  According to recent statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 out of 10 deaths reported in the United States of America have been adults 65 years.... Read More

             

Coronavirus Pandemic Exposes Gap in Mental Health Services for Seniors

By Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

The COVID-19 crisis, and with it the need to shelter in place, have exposed gaps in San Francisco’s services for seniors and LGBTQ seniors in particular.

The city has long established partnerships with community nonprofits with whom they have a successful track record for delivering in-person health and wellness services and programs and peer support groups that reduce social isolation and increase opportunities for program participants to engage, connect, and volunteer in their communities. For people who are not comfortable with in-person experiences, the Institute on Aging provides a phone service for older adults who need someone to listen to their concerns..... Read More

             

Diverse Elders Coalition Launches New COVID-19 Resource Hub


The COVID-19 pandemic has directly impacted older adults and caregivers in the United States. COVID-19 cases have surpassed 1 million, and there is at least one COVID-19 case in all 50 states. Individuals with weaker immune systems and underlying health conditions are most vulnerable to COVID-19, placing many older adults and people with disabilities at risk.

In our communities, COVID-19 is having an enormous impact on elders and caregivers, the challenges of which are exacerbated by existing health disparities and other socioeconomic factors, such as housing, poverty, lack of access to healthcare, and discrimination. It is not.... Read More

             

Community Statement on COVID-19

A PDF version of this letter can be found on the National Alliance for Caregiving website.

SUPPORT FAMILY CAREGIVERS

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has magnified what we’ve known all along – our institutions are not prepared to support family caregivers.

We write to urge government, community and religious leaders to please remember the challenges facing family caregivers as this public health crisis continues to unfold. Unpaid family caregivers are the backbone of the health care system in the United States, providing as much as 90 percent of all home health care for no pay.... Read More

             

COVID-19: We Must Care for Older Adults’ Mental Health

by Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. This article originally appeared on the AFSP Lifesaver Blog.

No matter your age, mental health and well-being are influenced by numerous factors and are susceptible to change. Right now, most people, across all sectors of society, are being affected by the global health crisis related to the coronavirus. One particular group we should keep in mind during this challenging time is older adults, whose routines and usual support systems may be disrupted.

The most powerful factors that impact mental health and well-being for.... Read More

             

Latinos, Victims of Depression Who Are Unaware or Live in Denial

by Agustín Durán. This article originally appeared in Spanish in La Opinión. Para leer en español, haga clic aquí.

Since her daughter Clara died, Gladys, 58, has barely participated in family celebrations; she is constantly sick, and her appearance seems very fragile.

She says that everything is fine, that they are the ailments of her age. She refuses to see a therapist and affirms she is not crazy. Gladys blames her sadness and lack of desire to do anything as pure figments of her children’s imaginations.

The truth is that 14 years have gone by since Clara died, but Gladys gives those she meets the impression that her daughter just died yesterday. Still, the immigrant from Guadalajara, Mexico, denies.... Read More

             
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