Connecting with Community

By Sally Ching. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

I knew from a very young age that I wanted to dedicate my life to fighting inequities. In what capacity, however, was something I struggled to identify until later in my life. I considered various career options and nearly pursued a few of them. It wasn’t until I reflected on the reason why this work was so important to me that I realized, no matter what I did, community always had to be at the center.

My parents came to the United States as Southeast Asian refugees. Like many immigrant parents, they encouraged me to work hard as a means for social mobility and instilled in me the.... Read More

             

Navigating Mental Health as a Khmer Social Worker

By Nary Rath. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog

My mom arrived to the United States in 1983 fleeing from war and genocide to seek refuge. She was 21 years old when she started a new life in Ohio and then set roots in Connecticut, where she raised my older sister and me. Rebuilding her life in this country has led to opportunities never imaginable for my family in Cambodia, but the exposure to pre- and post-migration trauma continues to be felt by entire communities of Southeast Asian Americans (SEAAs).

Surviving genocide, long-term exposure to violence, displacement, and anti-immigrant racism in the United States are all factors that contribute to the high prevalence of mental health issues.... Read More