Tackling Latino health, caregiving and housing is key as older population grows

By Laura Castañeda. This article originally appeared on NBC News.

Eduardo Covarrubias retired from his job as a museum security guard in Washington, D.C., 14 years ago and moved to Casa Iris, an affordable housing community for older adults.

The complex has 39 one-bedroom, 1,000-square-foot apartments for people ages 62 and older that cost a maximum of $813 per month, depending on income. To compare, the average one-bedroom apartment in the nation’s capital runs $2,213 monthly.

“It’s peaceful. There are good people living here and the administration is very efficient,” Covarrubias, 79, said in Spanish, adding that he would have had to move back to his native Bolivia long ago if not for Casa Iris.

Older.... Read More

             

The Importance of Latino Representation in Health Research

By NHCOA Media. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Precision medicine is a new approach to disease treatment and prevention that considers differences in people’s lifestyles, environment, and biological makeup, including their genetics.

Many groups, especially communities of color, have been historically underrepresented in health research. This disparity was highlighted with the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected different demographic groups in the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic made this disparity even more visible as the pandemic has affected every community differently. A 2021 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed 230 medical trials in the United States between 2011 and 2020 and found that, of those that reported race,.... Read More

             

We Must Support Our Hispanic/Latinx Caregivers

By Yanira Cruz and Ocean Le. This article appeared on the American Society on Aging (ASA), Generations Today | July-August 2021

Editor’s Note: This article represents the fifth in a series by the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) to be published in Generations Today. Articles are connected to ASA-hosted webinars; see end of article to register. The series of articles by the DEC highlights research from The Caregiving Initiative, a multiyear research project funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

The 2020 pandemic has brought up many problems for Hispanic/Latinx communities, and highlighted multiple preexisting health inequities identified in our 2019 national caregiving survey, particularly for Hispanic/Latinx caregivers. These inequities still exist and have proven problematic as we strive to vaccinate the.... Read More

             

Celebrating the resilience of the Hispanic community facing adversity

This article originally appeared in Spanish and English on the NHCOA blog to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Over the years, many Hispanic communities have faced various disparities in the United States. However, thanks to hard work, perseverance and courage of our people, today more than ever, Latino voices resonate in the struggle for a diverse, just and free country for all. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age,” that means, all of these elements contribute to a person’s health status. These determinants of health greatly define the differences in the quality of life experienced by different groups and if these disparities.... Read More

             

“Meals on Wheels” – Telemundo Oklahoma

by Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell. This video originally aired on Telemundo Oklahoma. The Spanish-language video embedded below includes English subtitles. A full English transcript is included below.

To be independent is something very important for human beings from the moment we begin to walk until we age. Fortunately there are organizations that help people stay longer in the place they call home.

At noon on a recent cold day in Oklahoma City, José de Loera Ruiz was on his way to have lunch with his friend Jerónimo Cazazos, who says, “For seven years friends like him have come to visit me.”

For approximately four years, José has been delivering lunch for Meals on Wheels to people who are homebound because.... Read More

             

Perla Rosales-Garay, M.D., Inspires Her Community Through Exercise and Alzheimer’s Education

This article originally appeared on the Alzheimer’s Association website.

Dr. Perla Rosales-Garay began working at The University of California in 1997, promoting health and nutrition for people living with diabetes. Today she dedicates her time to her patients and to children and older adults in the Hispanic/Latino community, providing free educational classes that focus on healthy living.

In the community of South Bay, San Diego, Dr. Rosales was teaching the Hispanic/Latino population about nutrition, working to educate her neighbors about how to prevent coronary heart disease and hypertension. “When I started teaching a painting course, I incorporated nutritional education through the products we snacked on during the class. I found that this simple act promoted eating.... Read More

             

For Aging Immigrants, Food from Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness

by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared on The Bold Italic.

“Do you have drumsticks?” my 85-year-old mother asks the cashier at the checkout counter at Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, California. The woman points to a pile of long, narrow, cylindrical vegetables near the counter. A half-hour later, a quick inventory of my mother’s cart reveals drumsticks, taro roots, squash, long beans, okra, winter melons, pointed gourd, snake gourd, spices, snack packets of murukkus and a bag of brown basmati rice.

Food bought, cooked, served and eaten is collectively the barometer of my mother’s moods, which are intricately entangled with her health. When she’s bustling around the kitchen, cooking sambar, kootuor olan with squash and winter melon,.... Read More

             
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