No Gym? No Worries — How to Stay Fit at Home

Plus: the right amount of exercise to stay healthy during the pandemic

By Sheryl Jean. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Since his gym closed, you might find Tom Hippman, 55, working out to Journey’s “Eye of the Tiger” in his Dallas living room, using whatever props he can find.

He’s been doing sit-ups against the wall, deadlifting 64-load bottles of Woolite, running through his parking garage and other exercises for 45 minutes a day.

“Being in a seven-hundred-square-foot apartment is a little more challenging,” Hippman says. “I’ve taken it on as a challenge.”

Many people are spending more time at home.... Read More

             

Innovative Center Improves Alzheimer’s Awareness Through Contextual Research on Arab Americans

by Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared in The Arab American News.

DEARBORN HEIGHTS — The Michigan Center for Contextual Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease (MCCFAD) is a newly formed Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR), housed at the University of Michigan and funded by the National Institute on Aging.

The center partners with Michigan State University, Wayne State University and Eastern Michigan University to address issues that surround Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD). It shares what is known about ADRD to create awareness, share resources and ultimately promote good health and well-being. It especially engages with the Middle Eastern/Arab American (ME/AA) communities in Metro Detroit and Latino communities in Grand Rapids.

As part of its.... Read More

             

National Nutrition Month: Highlight on the Elder Index and Food Insecurity

Developed by the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Elder Index tool is used to measure the income older people need to meet their daily living expenses while staying independent in their own homes. The Elder Index tool is specific to household size, location, housing and health status, unlike the Federal Poverty Level, another index used to assess income level.

Additionally, the Elder Index accounts for the cost of healthcare, transportation, miscellaneous essentials, and food. After attending the webinar “Promoting Better Communities for.... Read More

             

Simple Tips for Eating Well

by Cheryl Toner, MS, RDN. This article originally appeared on the blog of the National Council on Aging (NCOA).

There are few things in life as comforting and nourishing as food, but it can be controversial and confusing, too. It’s so essential to life one would think common sense is the main ingredient in making food choices, and common sense—along with personal heritage and beliefs—is an important guidepost. Food cultures around the world can look very different from one another, and each can be healthy. Rather than ignoring food customs and preferences, let’s anchor.... Read More

             

AMA offers 6 tips to improve heart health during American Heart Month

by Kelly Jakubek. This article originally appeared on the American Medical Association website.

To help the millions of Americans currently living with high blood pressure reduce their risk of heart attack and stroke, the American Medical Association (AMA) is offering six tips that Americans can take to improve their heart health. The release of these tips coincides with the start of February’s American Heart Month this week.

“In February, American Heart Month, we encourage all Americans to take control of their heart health by better understanding and monitoring their blood pressure levels and making healthy lifestyle changes that can significantly reduce their risk of serious health consequences associated with high blood pressure,” said AMA President Patrice.... Read More

             

Cliffs Notes for Growing Old Well

by Peter White. This article originally appeared in the Tennessee Tribune.

A Vanderbilt researcher has taken just about everything you need to know about living well as you age and condensed it into a 36-page pamphlet called “Aging & Injury.” It is a good read, practical, and thorough.

Cathy Maxwell was a bedside nurse for more than 20 years in critical care and trauma. She saw a lot of elderly patients come to the emergency room from falls or car accidents.

“I see these patients come in from an injury and the outcomes of the older patients compared to the younger patients was so different,” Maxwell said. She wanted to find out why.

Luckily for Maxwell,.... Read More

             

What’s Behind My Mother’s Obsession With Food?

by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared in India Currents.

“What did you eat today?” my mother, Sarada, begins her phone conversation with my twenty-three-year-old daughter in New York. When my daughter explains that she made rasam and sautéed cauliflower over the weekend, Sarada’s face lights up. Later she tells me she’s happy that all her grandchildren love rasam, a staple broth from the south of India.

Eighty-six-year-old Sarada immigrated to America in her 70s, and finds equanimity performing activities and engaging in conversations that hinge around food. When she meets people she doesn’t know, she connects through food conversations, often.... Read More

             

You Shouldn’t Need a Golden Ticket to Stay Mobile as You Age

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Perhaps no movie has better staying power than Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Many of us raised our children — and now our grandchildren — on the 1971 hit. In a movie filled with iconic scenes, one that really resonates with me involves Charlie’s four grandparents.

It’s hard to forget Grandpa Joe being confined to a bed, as life in the house goes on around him. He’s seemingly living out his later years as a.... Read More

             

Dances With Manangs

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared in Positively Filipino magazine.

My mother looked forward to Sunday because it was a day that she and her friends went to the dance hall in Daly City, located in the park off Acton Street at the Top of the Hill.

If you look back at archived books and film clips on the arrival of Filipinos in America, you will find that the means of socializing were the dances; playing pool in the pool halls; and celebrating birthdays, weddings, and job promotions with a vast amount of Filipino food: lechon; adobo; lumpia; kare-kare; pinakbet; dinuguan; and, of course, pancit.

Today, one can still see the same patterns of.... Read More

             

Live a Healthier Life in Your 60s and Beyond

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

When you reach your 60s, all the issues that arose in your 50s become more extreme.

Your yearly well-woman visit is a good time to check in with your doctor about how you’re doing, how you’d like to be doing and what changes you can make to reach your health goals. In addition to talking with your doctor or nurse about your health, you may also need certain vaccines and medical tests. Don’t worry. You won’t need every test every year.

Younger than 65? Right now a yearly well-woman visit won’t.... Read More

             

Blue Zones, Part 3: How the Oldest People in America’s Blue Zone Make Their Money Last

by Rich Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(In 2008, National Geographic writer Dan Buettner published his bestselling book, The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, about the five “longevity pockets” around the world. For this weekly series, Next Avenue Money and Work & Purpose editor Richard Eisenberg, a Gerontological Society of America Journalists in Aging Fellow, takes a different look at the Blue Zones — places where there’s a high concentration of people living past 90 without chronic illnesses. Rather than focusing on the residents’ diets, he reports.... Read More

             

Type 2 Diabetes: Lessons Learned from the Experiences of American Indians

In the United States, American Indians and Alaska Natives have a greater chance of having type 2 diabetes than any other racial group. This is very troubling because without medical intervention, the progression of type 2 diabetes may lead to other conditions and diseases including high blood pressure, kidney failure, and heart disease – the number one cause of death in the United States.

In the United States, American Indians and Alaska Native are 50% more likely to be obese than non-Hispanic whites. In addition, 33% of the American Indian and Alaska Native population is considered obese. In other words, more than a quarter of the American Indian.... Read More

             
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