Black and Brown Health Care Workers More Likely to Get COVID-19

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Health care workers of color were more likely to care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, more likely to report using inadequate or reused protective gear, and nearly twice as likely as white colleagues to test positive for the coronavirus, a new study from Harvard Medical School researchers found.

The study also showed that health care workers are at least three times more likely than the general public to report a positive COVID test, with risks rising for workers treating COVID patients.

Dr. Andrew Chan, a senior.... Read More

             

Meet the faces behind SAGE’s HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

On June 12, SAGE officially announced the formation of the new HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition (HAPAC). Generously funded by Gilead’s HIV Aging Positively Initiative, the coalition aims to build a dynamic, diverse, and long-term survivor driven group. HAPAC’s mission is focused on publicly acknowledging, drawing much-needed attention to, and meeting the needs of long-term survivors and LGBT older people living with HIV. This coalition is driven by long-term survivors working alongside representatives from some of our country’s leading HIV and aging advocacy organizations and community and grassroots-based organizations. Below, meet the members of the coalition and learn more about their work:

TEZ.... Read More

             

Writing the Poignant New York Times COVID-19 Obituaries

By Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

You can learn in The New York Times how many humans have died from the coronavirus from its Tracking the Coronavirus graphic (472,125 as of June 23, 2020). But to understand the humanity, you need to read The Times’ Those We’ve Lost obituary series.

Dan Wakin, who edits Those We’ve Lost, said he wants its readers to get a sense “of the scope of the pandemic; that it spares no one. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, how educated you are, how brilliant a doctor you are. You can die.”

Beyond that, Wakin said, he also hopes readers will “come away.... Read More

             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one.... Read More

             

Luis has HIV and is protecting himself against the novel coronavirus, COVID-19

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. Para leer este artículo en español, haga clic aquí.

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. That is believed to spread primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

It is also possible for a person to become infected by COVID-19 by touching surfaces or objects that have the virus on them and then touch their own mouth, nose or eyes.

Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate.... Read More

             

Does High Blood Pressure Influence COVID-19 Outcomes?

As we navigate the COVID-19 global pandemic, it is clear that older adults and people with underlying medical conditions are at greater risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes. According to the CDC, 8 out of 10 deaths reported in the US have been in adults 65 and older. People with underlying medical conditions such as heart disease, lung disease, and diabetes are also prone to develop more serious complications from COVID-19, but what about high blood pressure? Does high blood pressure affect COVID-19 outcomes?

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is highly prevalent in the United.... Read More

             

The Case for Racial Equity in Aging Has Never Been Stronger

by Robert Espinoza and Jean Accius. This article originally appeared on the blog of the American Society on Aging.

In early April, as the COVID-19 crisis spread across the world, two notable developments took hold. First, the United States became the pandemic’s epicenter, reporting more confirmed cases and deaths than in any other nation. Second, it became clear that black and Latino people in the United States were being hospitalized and dying from the virus at disproportionate rates.

Given that older adults and people with serious medical conditions are at greatest risk.... Read More

             
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