Pandemic Increases Emotional Toll on Informal Caregivers in Post-Hurricane Puerto Rico

By Mayra Acevedo. This article originally appeared in Spanish on Medicina Salud Publica

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — While many co-workers in the media have been laid off because of the economic crisis the Puerto Rico was already facing before the Covid-19 pandemic, Carla, 35, and one of our best video editors at WIPR, arranged to work part time. One thing she cannot afford is getting sick with the coronavirus.

“Since the pandemic I only go to work and resolve moms’ basic needs. Because I’m worried mom might get sick I don’t do a lot of.... Read More

             

Navigating Mental Health as a Khmer Social Worker

By Nary Rath. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog

My mom arrived to the United States in 1983 fleeing from war and genocide to seek refuge. She was 21 years old when she started a new life in Ohio and then set roots in Connecticut, where she raised my older sister and me. Rebuilding her life in this country has led to opportunities never imaginable for my family in Cambodia, but the exposure to pre- and post-migration trauma continues to be felt by entire communities of Southeast Asian Americans (SEAAs).

Surviving genocide, long-term exposure to violence, displacement, and anti-immigrant racism in the United States are all factors that contribute to the high prevalence of mental health issues.... Read More