PHI Launches ‘The National Direct Care Workforce Resource Center’

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

A new online resource aims to strengthen the evidence base on the direct care workforce by gathering and centralizing the various studies, reports, and other resources that have been published about these workers—and by supporting leaders across disciplines in filling the knowledge gaps on this workforce.

As the country’s largest online library of information on direct care workers, The National Direct Care Workforce Center will support researchers, policymakers, practitioners, advocates, and journalists in better understanding—and building the knowledge base on—this critical workforce of 4.5 million.... Read More

             

Why People of Color Feel the Loneliest at Work

by Leslie Hunter-Gadsen. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(In February 2020, Next Avenue published an article about the Cigna survey, Loneliness and the Workplace 2020 U.S. Report. Among its findings, based on a survey of 10,441 adults: African-American and Hispanic workers feel lonelier than whites. The black and Hispanic workers surveyed were more likely than whites to say they felt abandoned by coworkers when under pressure at work and more alienated from coworkers. Below, Leslie Hunter-Gadsden provides a follow-up, with insights about the racial loneliness-at-work divide and what could reduce it. Cigna did not supply someone to be interviewed for this article when requested. — The Editors)

In the Cigna loneliness at work.... Read More

             

NICOA SCSEP Success Story: Diane Martinez

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Diane Martinez is the picture of a resilient elder whose journey and difficulties led to success. As a member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, traditions are especially important to her. She attends the Weoguf-kee (Muddy Waters) Ceremonial Grounds in Hanna, Oklahoma, and has learned some of her native Mvskoke language through classes at the College of the Muscogee Nation, which she teaches to her grandchildren.

After surviving many challenges, she has finally found a place where she can thrive. As a participant in the National Indian Council.... Read More

             

The Case for Racial Equity in Aging Has Never Been Stronger

by Robert Espinoza and Jean Accius. This article originally appeared on the blog of the American Society on Aging.

In early April, as the COVID-19 crisis spread across the world, two notable developments took hold. First, the United States became the pandemic’s epicenter, reporting more confirmed cases and deaths than in any other nation. Second, it became clear that black and Latino people in the United States were being hospitalized and dying from the virus at disproportionate rates.

Given that older adults and people with serious medical conditions are at greatest risk of.... Read More

             

Let’s Pause to Celebrate a Historic Win for Direct Care Workers

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically altered our way of living while putting enormous pressures on the health and long-term care sectors, including the direct care workforce. Epidemiologists are predicting that it will continue to worsen in the months ahead, straining our health care resources, the economy, and the full aging and long-term care system.

In times of crisis, important policy wins are often understandably overshadowed by more pressing matters. In this context, one major win for direct care workers took place last Wednesday when President Trump signed into law the Supporting Older Americans Act of 2020, which reauthorizes the Older Americans Act (OAA) for five more years and increases funding levels for its programs.... Read More

             

We’re Hiring! Are You Our New National Director?


The Diverse Elders Coalition is excited to announce that we are hiring for a new National Director. We are a dynamic, collaborative group of people working to improve aging in diverse communities.

Check out the full position description to learn more and apply.

Apply by May 5th for priority application consideration!

The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) is seeking an accomplished, passionate National Director to lead our coalition’s growing presence in the fields of aging policy advocacy and education. The National Director will be responsible for developing the coalition’s policy advocacy and training programs, representing our members and our work.... Read More

             

Direct Care Workers Can Address Social Isolation and Loneliness

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

Illustration by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

A remarkable though unsettling new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine has drawn attention to the extensive harm that social isolation and loneliness are having on the health and well-being of older adults. The report—Social Isolation and Loneliness in Older Adults: Opportunities for the Health Care System—provides a sweeping overview of these two issues, as well as a compelling rationale for why the.... Read More

             

Aging in Massachusetts is Getting Harder

by Tibisay Zea. This article originally appeared in El Planeta, New England’s Spanish-language newspaper. Haga clic aquí para leer este artículo en español.

One of the biggest challenges of aging is securing economic stability while productivity progressively decreases. This seems harder to achieve in Massachusetts, as it has the worst financial security numbers for older adults, shows a recent study by the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston (UMass Boston).

More than half of people 65 or older in the state live alone, and a third of those living as a couple do not have enough money to cover their basic needs on their own (housing, transportation, health care.... Read More

             

7 Reasons We Need the ‘Caring for the Future’ Report Series

Last week, PHI released an urgent, new report on the direct care workforce. It’s Time to Care: A Detailed Profile of America’s Direct Care Workforce provides a thorough overview of the direct care workforce (including key concepts and definitions), an analysis of how the direct care role has evolved, and a statistical profile of the workforce with key demographics, socio-economic characteristics, and future projections.

But It’s Time to Care not a stand-alone report. It’s the first installment in a yearlong series of reports that will examine the importance and impact of the direct care workforce. The final report— Caring for the Future:.... Read More

             

What we owe to one another

by SAGE Communications

In Fall 2019, the SAGE team jetted to Los Angeles and Miami to produce our national LGBT Speed Mentoring program. Just like ‘speed dating,’ a speed mentoring includes facilitated one-on-one conversations and time to mingle. Cue cards prompt conversations about participants’ current projects, goals, and skills in a fun atmosphere with peppy music and tasty food and drinks.

Within two hours, some are exchanging Instagram handles, and others are asking “can you teach me Instagram?” And this is exactly the crux of mentorship: building and maintaining a relationship based on.... Read More

             

New Report Showcases the Nation’s Leading Gen2Gen Cities

by Corita Brown. This article originally appeared on Encore.org.

Encore.org releases #Gen2Gen Cities, a guide to intergenerational strategies for public sector innovators seeking solutions to community challenges.

Across the country, innovative city and county leaders see an aging population as an opportunity for intergenerational strategies that help meet multiple challenges with a single intervention. Here are a few examples:

In New York City, nonprofit and city leaders launched an effort to pair youth living in homeless shelters with low-income older adults who have an extra room. The goal: to help stabilize two of.... Read More
             

The Double Whammy for Older, Low-Wage Workers With Chronic Conditions

by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Sixty percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, such as heart disease or diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic diseases are even more common among older, low-income adults and minorities. But when Kendra Jason, a sociology professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studied workplace supports for older, low-income black workers with chronic conditions, she found some serious problems.

Jason, who specializes in issues of work and inequality, interviewed 10 female and five male black workers at an urban university in the Southeast who were 50 and older, had two or more chronic conditions and earned.... Read More

             
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