Taking care of each other, taking care of ourselves

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog. 

Over the past year, we have faced the COVID-19 pandemic, an onslaught of racial injustice, and a historic presidential election, yet through it all, LGBT elders continue their activism and refuse to be invisible. While we are inspired to remain resilient, it is also important to remember that no one can take on this fight alone.

With Election Day coming up, many are riddled with uncertainty and fear about what comes next. This isn’t going to be like any Election Day we’ve seen before. It will likely be weeks before we know the official results, which can cause emotional, mental, and physical discomfort. The conversations around us may feel exhausting and.... Read More

             

Find a Way to Vote Safely in 2020, Amidst the Pandemic

By Lauren Pongan, National Director, Diverse Elders Coalition.

In the United States, we’re used to thinking about elections as a cathartic day when we take action and contribute to the democratic process. Historically, every 4 years, the first Tuesday (after the first Monday) in November has been a day for the American people to define our political direction for the next few years. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed so many aspects of our daily lives, and the political process is no exception. In addition to the obvious shifts towards online and digital campaigning, the process of voting has changed too. In many ways, it has become election season rather than election day, with early voting now offered in 43 states and the District of Columbia(1). 

According to the Associated Press, as of October 25,.... Read More

             

Over 1.5 Million American Indians Aren’t Registered to Vote

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog

There are 4.7 million American Indians who are of voting age, according to a report titled “Obstacles at Every Turn: Barriers to Political Participation Faced by Native American Voters.” However, only 66 percent of those eligible to vote are registered. Over 1.5 million Native people are eligible to vote but remain unregistered. American Indians face specific barriers to political participation throughout the voting process.

Both non-traditional mailing addresses and housing insecurity make it difficult to provide proof of residence in a state or county. The report also lists several other factors that prevent Native people from starting the first step of registration: voter identification requirements, unequal access to online registration due.... Read More