How to be a long-distance caregiver?

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The COVID-19 pandemic and the health precaution it brought with it, have now also required remote caregiving to also became an essential part of some people’s daily routine. Meeting or visiting someone is now more complicated and is not recommended because it could endanger the health of everyone involved, especially if the person receiving care is an older adult. Therefore, long-distance caregiving has taken more prominence as a solution in this current situation.

It is necessary to emphasize that long distance caregivers, in most cases, need the help of a primary or full-time caregiver, who is in charge of caring for the older adult, especially if they are caring for a.... Read More

             

Caregiving in a Pandemic Webinar December 3

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog. 

The National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA), the Diverse Elders Coalition and the National Alliance for Caregiving are hosting a webinar focused on the needs of American Indian and Alaska Native caregivers in the time of COVID-19. Together, we invite you to join us for “Caregiving in a Pandemic: Accessing Services and Supports” December 3, 2020 12:30 p.m. EST.

Do you provide care or support for a friend or relative? If so, this session is for you! First 75 participants will receive a $25 gift card.

The webinar features interactive poll questions, and speakers such NICOA Executive Director Larry Curley; Captain Susan Karol, MD, Medical Officer for the Centers for.... Read More

             

How to Stay Safe from Coronavirus this Holiday

By Kathleen Cameron, BSPharm, MPH. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

How to Stay Safe from Coronavirus this Holiday Key Takeaways: With COVID-19 cases rising in almost all states, the holidays will require extra safety precautions this year. The best way to prevent the spread of coronavirus is to follow guidelines for safe holiday activities. If you’re considering hosting or attending a gathering, there are several important factors to consider.

If you’re like me and many other Americans, the holidays are your favorite time of year. We spend time with those we love, enjoy delicious food, and have fun playing games, watching football, or other family traditions. These pastimes are exactly what we need right now after.... Read More

             

Honoring Marny Xiong’s Legacy in Our Fight for Culturally Competent Healthcare

By Kham S. Moua. This article originally appeared on SEARAC’s blog.

COVID-19 has killed over 220,000 Americans, including my cousin. At 31, Marny had just started her tenure as Chair of the Saint Paul School Board. She was intelligent, beautiful, and ambitious, but most of all, she was kind and compassionate. While I was often a wallflower, Marny always dazzled the room. At family reunions and community gatherings, she would easily maneuver between Hmong and English, bring the young and the old together in conversation, and discuss why our communities needed to work within and without to progress the rights of all students.

In the days leading up to her death, she was a shell of her former self..... Read More

             

Taking care of each other, taking care of ourselves

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog. 

Over the past year, we have faced the COVID-19 pandemic, an onslaught of racial injustice, and a historic presidential election, yet through it all, LGBT elders continue their activism and refuse to be invisible. While we are inspired to remain resilient, it is also important to remember that no one can take on this fight alone.

With Election Day coming up, many are riddled with uncertainty and fear about what comes next. This isn’t going to be like any Election Day we’ve seen before. It will likely be weeks before we know the official results, which can cause emotional, mental, and physical discomfort. The conversations around us may feel exhausting and.... Read More

             

Find a Way to Vote Safely in 2020, Amidst the Pandemic

By Lauren Pongan, National Director, Diverse Elders Coalition.

In the United States, we’re used to thinking about elections as a cathartic day when we take action and contribute to the democratic process. Historically, every 4 years, the first Tuesday (after the first Monday) in November has been a day for the American people to define our political direction for the next few years. The COVID-19 pandemic has changed so many aspects of our daily lives, and the political process is no exception. In addition to the obvious shifts towards online and digital campaigning, the process of voting has changed too. In many ways, it has become election season rather than election day, with early voting now offered in 43 states and the District of Columbia(1). 

According to the Associated Press, as of October 25,.... Read More

             

Understanding the Impact of COVID on the LGBTQI Movement

This article originally appeared on the LGBT MAP blog

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all of us, making 2020 a year filled with challenges like no other. For individuals and families, workers and businesses, and social change organizations like LGBTQI and allied social justice organizations, COVID-19 has upended how we learn, work, and connect.

To understand.... Read More

             

When Your Employer Insists You Go Into Work During the Pandemic

The recourse rules for employees are complicated and somewhat untested

By Rosie Wolf Williams. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Millions of Americans have been instructed by their employers to work from home due to the coronavirus pandemic. But what if your boss insists you continue coming into your workplace, especially if you’re dealing with an autoimmune deficiency, going through medical treatments or recovering from an illness? Do you have any recourse?

The question is a piercing one for some workers right now, since showing up could increase their risk of contracting COVID-19. And the answer is complicated.

Denied the Ability.... Read More
             

The Ways the Pandemic Has Influenced Our Eating Habits

More cooking, more uncertainty, less exercise and less sleep have taken their toll

By Randi Mazzella. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Last week, my husband and I decided since outdoor dining resumed in our state, we would go out to dinner. For the first time in several months, I decided to get dressed up. I noticed that all my “real” pants felt snug at the waist.

The pandemic and staying at home had changed my eating habits immensely. Over the past few months, dinner had become the focal point of our family’s day. I was cooking more elaborate meals. Indulging in.... Read More

             

No Gym? No Worries — How to Stay Fit at Home

Plus: the right amount of exercise to stay healthy during the pandemic

By Sheryl Jean. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Since his gym closed, you might find Tom Hippman, 55, working out to Journey’s “Eye of the Tiger” in his Dallas living room, using whatever props he can find.

He’s been doing sit-ups against the wall, deadlifting 64-load bottles of Woolite, running through his parking garage and other exercises for 45 minutes a day.

“Being in a seven-hundred-square-foot apartment is a little more challenging,” Hippman says. “I’ve taken it on as a challenge.”

Many people are spending more time at home.... Read More

             

Pandemic Increases Emotional Toll on Informal Caregivers in Post-Hurricane Puerto Rico

By Mayra Acevedo. This article originally appeared in Spanish on Medicina Salud Publica

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — While many co-workers in the media have been laid off because of the economic crisis the Puerto Rico was already facing before the Covid-19 pandemic, Carla, 35, and one of our best video editors at WIPR, arranged to work part time. One thing she cannot afford is getting sick with the coronavirus.

“Since the pandemic I only go to work and resolve moms’ basic needs. Because I’m worried mom might get sick I don’t do a lot of.... Read More

             

COVID-19, aging, dementia and social bonds; an Arab American perspective

By Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared on Arab American News

 

DEARBORN, Mich. – COVID-19 has been a difficult ordeal for Sylvana Berry, 24, and her family. Berry is extremely close to, and has been directly involved in the care of her grandmother, Samira Baghdadi, who has Alzheimer’s Disease.

Baghdadi migrated to the U.S. in 1976 with her husband and six children, escaping from the Lebanese Civil War. She ran a resale shop in Detroit with her family.

Things changed for the large but tight-knit family once they learned their beloved matriarch was having trouble remembering things. Back in 2007, it was Berry and her sister Selena who noticed changes in their grandmother, like when she would get lost on her.... Read More

             
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