Black and Brown Health Care Workers More Likely to Get COVID-19

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Health care workers of color were more likely to care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, more likely to report using inadequate or reused protective gear, and nearly twice as likely as white colleagues to test positive for the coronavirus, a new study from Harvard Medical School researchers found.

The study also showed that health care workers are at least three times more likely than the general public to report a positive COVID test, with risks rising for workers treating COVID patients.

Dr. Andrew Chan, a senior.... Read More

             

COVID-19 Impact: Ocean’s Story

This blog post was originally featured on SEARAC’s blog.

Ocean Le, program coordinator at Diverse Elders Coalition and a SEARAC LAT alumnus, says he’s been his parents’ translator for as long as he can remember.

“I can tell you their Social Security numbers right now because I’ve been supporting them my whole life,” shares Ocean, the eldest of three children to a Nigerian Vietnamese immigrant mother and Vietnamese French immigrant father.

With his dad being a self-employed taxi driver who cannot speak English very well, Ocean has done his taxes since childhood. When he.... Read More

             

How to care for someone with COVID-19 at home

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues and cases increase, many people are continuing their coronavirus treatment and recovery at home. Whether the person has symptoms or has been diagnosed with COVID-19, certain measures need to be taken to protect the health and wellbeing of patients and those living in the households with COVID-19 positive patients.

Below are recommendations for actions you can take at home:

Caregiving at home:

Caregivers and people who are infected with COVID-19 should wear masks when they are in the same.... Read More
             

A Pandemic Is Not the Time to Sever the Ties That Bind Generations

by Donna Butts. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(Across caregiving and community, business and intergenerational attitudes, the pandemic and how we respond to it could change us forever. Next Avenue turned to some of our Influencers in Aging, a diverse group of thought leaders, for their insights, counsel and opinions of what could lie ahead — if we choose. This article, by a 2015 Next Avenue Influencer in Aging, originally appeared on Medium.com.)

It’s too early to know if social isolation or the coronavirus (COVID-19).... Read More

             

Virtual Classes for Older Adults: Here to Stay

by Susan Stiles, PhD. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

“I look forward to the calls each week.”

This comment was typical of the feedback that Peggy Schmidt received when she offered a virtual Aging Mastery “book club” to her rural constituents in Wisconsin. As the Caregiver/Health Promotion Specialist for the Aging & Disability Resource Center there, she transformed in-person classes to virtual ones, but after a survey revealed a deep digital divide in her community, she conducted classes via telephone. These weekly sessions provided one means for her and.... Read More

             

Writing the Poignant New York Times COVID-19 Obituaries

By Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

You can learn in The New York Times how many humans have died from the coronavirus from its Tracking the Coronavirus graphic (472,125 as of June 23, 2020). But to understand the humanity, you need to read The Times’ Those We’ve Lost obituary series.

Dan Wakin, who edits Those We’ve Lost, said he wants its readers to get a sense “of the scope of the pandemic; that it spares no one. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, how educated you are, how brilliant a doctor you are. You can die.”

Beyond that, Wakin said, he also hopes readers will “come away.... Read More

             

Maximize Your Virtual Health Care Visit

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Social distancing recommendations have forced us to change the way health care is being delivered. Virtual health care visits allow providers to see patients when coming into the clinic isn’t an option. They help us minimize disease spread, eliminate unnecessary hospital visits and free up resources so people in critical need can be better served.

Virtual health care isn’t new. Telemedicine appointments have been used for years by physicians for post-operative and follow-up appointments, but many of us haven’t taken part in video-based visits. So it stands to reason that some of us might be nervous the first time we have a telehealth visit, especially.... Read More

             

As An HIV Survivor, COVID-19 Stigma Is Sadly Familiar

by John-Manuel Andriote. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Elizabeth Martucci figured it made perfect sense to share the exciting news that she and her 11-year-old son had recovered from COVID-19. The New Jersey resident even had “COVID-19 Survivor” T-shirts made.

Martucci didn’t anticipate the response she’d get to being a survivor — and the sometimes jarring lengths to which some will go because of their fear. As The New York Times reported in a story about Martucci, “Even now, a month into their recovery, some neighbors see them and run.”

.... Read More
             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based.... Read More

             

COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one.... Read More

             

Lifeline Has Additional Support For Tribal Lands

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Lifeline consumers can receive up to $25 per month discount (and up to $100 reduction for first-time connection charges) in addition to the standard Lifeline benefit amount if they live on federally recognized tribal lands.

Lifeline customers residing on tribal lands are eligible for Link Up. Link Up is a one-time benefit per address; you can request Link Up each time you change your primary residential address. Link Up can reimburse the full cost of initiating service with certain phone/internet companies at your.... Read More

             
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