Why understanding the impact of the pandemic in Detroit’s Bangladeshi community is more complicated than you think.

By . This article originally appeared on Tostada Magazine.

Growing up in my Bangladeshi family in Hamtramck, I could literally hear someone turn on the shower next door. In the summer months, I could almost eavesdrop on entire conversations taking place through the windows. When I was younger, I remember having to keep the curtains closed at all times because our neighbors could see everything in our home if we left them open.

With homes less than five feet away from each other, often separated by only a narrow breezeway, people are cramped into one or two-story bungalows and two-flats. In some cases, two or three families live in intergenerational.... Read More

             

NICOA Creates COVID-19 Tribal Needs Assessment

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

The National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) invites you to participate in our COVID-19 tribal needs assessment. Your participation will positively impact the wellbeing of American Indian and Alaska Native elders.

As the leading national Native aging organization for elders, we strive to provide information that will assist tribes and their communities. The information we gather will help us better understand how tribes have been affected by COVID-19 and the mental, physical and social impact it has had on their health. It will also serve to illustrate what Indian Country looks like to those who do not know, and help us focus our efforts most effectively.

Once the information is collected and.... Read More

             

The world goes through the second wave of pandemic due to COVID-19

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Around the world, several countries are registering new spikes in cases, indicating a second wave of COVID-19. The rise in cases is driven by Europe, the United States and some countries in South America.

In total, more than 47 million people have been infected around the world, more than a million deaths due to the pandemic, and the numbers seem to increase disproportionately over time.

In Europe, the World Health Organization (WHO) recently announced that deaths from COVID-19 increased by almost 40% compared to previous records. Countries such as France and Germany have partially closed again in order to stop the spread of the virus. In Spain, a state of alarm.... Read More

             

How to Stay Safe from Coronavirus this Holiday

By Kathleen Cameron, BSPharm, MPH. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

How to Stay Safe from Coronavirus this Holiday Key Takeaways: With COVID-19 cases rising in almost all states, the holidays will require extra safety precautions this year. The best way to prevent the spread of coronavirus is to follow guidelines for safe holiday activities. If you’re considering hosting or attending a gathering, there are several important factors to consider.

If you’re like me and many other Americans, the holidays are your favorite time of year. We spend time with those we love, enjoy delicious food, and have fun playing games, watching football, or other family traditions. These pastimes are exactly what we need right now after.... Read More

             

Understanding the Impact of COVID on the LGBTQI Movement

This article originally appeared on the LGBT MAP blog

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all of us, making 2020 a year filled with challenges like no other. For individuals and families, workers and businesses, and social change organizations like LGBTQI and allied social justice organizations, COVID-19 has upended how we learn, work, and connect.

To understand.... Read More

             

When Your Employer Insists You Go Into Work During the Pandemic

The recourse rules for employees are complicated and somewhat untested

By Rosie Wolf Williams. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Millions of Americans have been instructed by their employers to work from home due to the coronavirus pandemic. But what if your boss insists you continue coming into your workplace, especially if you’re dealing with an autoimmune deficiency, going through medical treatments or recovering from an illness? Do you have any recourse?

The question is a piercing one for some workers right now, since showing up could increase their risk of contracting COVID-19. And the answer is complicated.

Denied the Ability.... Read More
             

The Ways the Pandemic Has Influenced Our Eating Habits

More cooking, more uncertainty, less exercise and less sleep have taken their toll

By Randi Mazzella. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Last week, my husband and I decided since outdoor dining resumed in our state, we would go out to dinner. For the first time in several months, I decided to get dressed up. I noticed that all my “real” pants felt snug at the waist.

The pandemic and staying at home had changed my eating habits immensely. Over the past few months, dinner had become the focal point of our family’s day. I was cooking more elaborate meals. Indulging in.... Read More

             

No Gym? No Worries — How to Stay Fit at Home

Plus: the right amount of exercise to stay healthy during the pandemic

By Sheryl Jean. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Since his gym closed, you might find Tom Hippman, 55, working out to Journey’s “Eye of the Tiger” in his Dallas living room, using whatever props he can find.

He’s been doing sit-ups against the wall, deadlifting 64-load bottles of Woolite, running through his parking garage and other exercises for 45 minutes a day.

“Being in a seven-hundred-square-foot apartment is a little more challenging,” Hippman says. “I’ve taken it on as a challenge.”

Many people are spending more time at home.... Read More

             

COVID-19, aging, dementia and social bonds; an Arab American perspective

By Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared on Arab American News

 

DEARBORN, Mich. – COVID-19 has been a difficult ordeal for Sylvana Berry, 24, and her family. Berry is extremely close to, and has been directly involved in the care of her grandmother, Samira Baghdadi, who has Alzheimer’s Disease.

Baghdadi migrated to the U.S. in 1976 with her husband and six children, escaping from the Lebanese Civil War. She ran a resale shop in Detroit with her family.

Things changed for the large but tight-knit family once they learned their beloved matriarch was having trouble remembering things. Back in 2007, it was Berry and her sister Selena who noticed changes in their grandmother, like when she would get lost on her.... Read More

             

Shortchanged Shawnee Tribe Sues U.S. Treasury

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog

The Shawnee Tribe, which is headquartered in Miami, filed a federal lawsuit against U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last month, alleging the tribe was stiffed about $6 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act relief funds. The federal treasury had based its distribution on a database that incorrectly listed the Shawnee Tribe’s tribal enrollment as zero when it actually has 3,021 tribal citizens, the lawsuit states.

In the Shawnee Tribe’s federal lawsuit, which was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma, the tribe claims the U.S. Treasury Department disregarded the tribe’s population data and instead used HUD Indian Housing Block Grant data that doesn’t count.... Read More

             

Black and Brown Health Care Workers More Likely to Get COVID-19

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Health care workers of color were more likely to care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, more likely to report using inadequate or reused protective gear, and nearly twice as likely as white colleagues to test positive for the coronavirus, a new study from Harvard Medical School researchers found.

The study also showed that health care workers are at least three times more likely than the general public to report a positive COVID test, with risks rising for workers treating COVID patients.

Dr. Andrew Chan, a senior.... Read More

             

COVID-19 Impact: Ocean’s Story

This blog post was originally featured on SEARAC’s blog.

Ocean Le, program coordinator at Diverse Elders Coalition and a SEARAC LAT alumnus, says he’s been his parents’ translator for as long as he can remember.

“I can tell you their Social Security numbers right now because I’ve been supporting them my whole life,” shares Ocean, the eldest of three children to a Nigerian Vietnamese immigrant mother and Vietnamese French immigrant father.

With his dad being a self-employed taxi driver who cannot speak English very well, Ocean has done his taxes since childhood. When he.... Read More

             
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