Aging Out Loud: From Generation to Generation

by Renée Markus Hodin. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

We want to pay tribute to a leader with whom many Health Policy Hub readers may not be familiar: Nelson Cruikshank. Nelson was a longtime leader in the labor movement who was instrumental in creating two of the most important programs for vulnerable older adults and people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare.

Born in 1902, Nelson grew up to become a Methodist minister and, later, a union organizer. After a series of jobs in the federal government – including one setting up camps for migrant farm workers, a program later made famous in John Steinbeck’s novel, The Grapes of.... Read More

             

Coronavirus-Related Xenophobia Against People of Asian Heritage Must Stop

by Maya Nakamura. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

All my life, I have been fortunate enough to never feel the need to question or fear how my identity is perceived by others. As a proud daughter of Asian immigrants, I have always worn my Japanese heritage on my sleeve, happy to share and educate others about my experiences – even if it means fending off the occasional ignorant or offensive remark.

However, recently these ‘occasional’ remarks have increased ten-fold and evolved from ignorant to outright hateful. Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) which originated in Wuhan, China, Asians around the globe have experienced an influx of.... Read More

             

Opportunity for People with Lived Experiences To Improve Treatment and Services for Substance Use Disorders

             

Join a Focus Group!

Community Catalyst and Faces & Voices of Recovery are looking for people to participate in focus groups to help improve treatment and services.

What is the purpose of the groups?
The groups will discuss what results people want most from treatment and services. The information shared will influence future research and action to improve recovery outcomes.... Read More

             

New Data Show ACA Is Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Coverage

by Dara S. Taylor. This article originally appeared on the Community Catalyst blog.

Since the passage of the ACA over 20 million people have gained access to health insurance coverage through the Marketplace. A recent issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund reaffirms that substantially lowering uninsurance rates nationwide has also led to reductions in racial and ethnic disparities in health coverage. The health coverage gains have been most pronounced for minority groups and individuals with incomes below 139 percent of the federal poverty level.

Before the passage of the ACA, Latinx people had the highest initial uninsurance rate. Black people also had higher initial uninsurance rates than whites. Therefore, a reduction of.... Read More

             

What’s At Stake In Trump Promise To Roll Back ACA Nondiscrimination Rule?

by Lois Uttley. This article originally appeared on the Community Catalyst blog.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes a groundbreaking nondiscrimination provision known as Section 1557, or the “Health Care Rights Law,” which serves as the first federal law to prohibit sex discrimination in health care. Section 1557 is critical to protecting women and LGBTQ individuals from discrimination in health care. Unfortunately, Section 1557 is not immune from ongoing efforts to sabotage the ACA: The Trump Administration indicated that it intends to roll back or repeal parts of the rule that the Obama administration issued in 2016 implementing Section 1557.

What is Section 1557 and how did the Obama rule interpret it?

Section 1557 of the ACA.... Read More

             

Winning Strategies: Organizing Consumers for Delivery Reform

by Jessie Zimmerer. This post originally appeared on the Center for Community Engagement in Health Innovation blog.

If health care advocacy were a sport, there’d be no question about our defensive strategy. Much of our collective efforts over the last few years have centered around defeating threats to Medicaid and Medicare, and protecting the Affordable Care Act. Defense is crucial; defense is where games are lost. And defense is exciting. There’s a palpable urgency in the crunch to defend needed programs that piques the interest of otherwise passive spectators, and as our state partners have seen,.... Read More

             

New Video: Embracing Culturally Competent Care for LGBTQ Older Adults

by Renée Markus Hodin. This post originally appeared on the Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovation.

October 11 is the 29th annual National Coming Out Day (NCOD) which celebrates people of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) identities feeling empowered to make their true selves known – to their families, friends and coworkers and in their broader communities. In 1994, October was designated as LGBTQ History Month with NCOD as its anchor date.

In the spirit of this month and Coming Out Day, the Center for Consumer Engagement in Health Innovation is pleased to share.... Read More

             

When Health Policy Advocacy Doesn’t See Color, It Doesn’t See Me

by Ana Maria De La Rosa. This post originally appeared on the Community Catalyst Health Policy Hub.

Our advocacy around race and health requires us to address racism as a cause of poor health, recognizing that without addressing this root cause, attempts at solving health inequities will continuously fall short. However, in order to bring full awareness to the consequences of racism on health outcomes, we must take a step even further back, and address the ways structural racism is embedded in health policy and health advocacy.

When the foundations for the health advocacy strategies that shape our policies are flawed, we build structures that benefit some people above others. We then spend.... Read More

             

Patient-Centered Care? We Have a Long Way to Go

This post by Andi Mullin originally appeared on the Community Catalyst Health Policy Hub blog.

On April 4, my 73-year-old mother had back surgery. It was a difficult and lengthy procedure and, unfortunately, she experienced a series of post-operative complications. She remained in the hospital for 12 days, and for several of those days things looked very serious. For the first time since I started doing health system transformation policy work, I had an opportunity to experience the acute care side of our health system not merely as a policy advocate, but as a worried family member.

There was a lot about my mom’s medical care that was good. Crucially, the complicated surgery itself appears to have been.... Read More

             

At the Intersection of Income Inequality and Geography: A Case for a Broad Approach to Health

by Trevon Meyers. This post originally appeared on the Community Catalyst Health Policy Hub blog.

For several decades, data has shown a trend toward the concentration of poverty and increasing income inequality in major cities across America. Take New York City for example, a metropolitan area often cited to demonstrate some of the highest gaps in income between wealthy and poor residents in the country. As the wealth gap has continued to grow over time, a distinct correlation between income level and life expectancy has emerged, with higher incomes found to be associated with longer life spans.

Some striking analysis from The Health Inequality Project provides new details on the.... Read More

             
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