NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Cecilia Wu

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Cecilia Wu, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Cecilia Wu, formerly lived in Japan and Taiwan, shares her.... Read More

             

Death and Dying: A Filipino American Perspective

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared on AsAmNews.

The concept of family is strong in Filipino culture. As far as I can remember, growing up both in San Francisco, then in Quezon City, Philippines, to attend school, I always heard the phrase, “Blood is thicker than water.”

Having close family ties is one of the outstanding cultural values that Filipinos have. The family takes care of each other and is taught to be loyal to family and elders by simply obeying their authorities. Having fondness for family reunions during secular and religious holidays, such as Christmas, New Year’s Eve, All Saints’ Day, All Souls Day, Holy Week, Fiestas, homecomings, birthdays, weddings, graduations, baptisms, and funerals, is.... Read More

             

CAPAC Discusses Alarming Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations under Trump

WASHINGTON, DC – Last week, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) held a Congressional Forum on the Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations. Members of Congress in attendance included CAPAC Chair Judy Chu (D-CA-27), CAPAC Immigration Task Force Chair Pramila Jayapal, (D-WA-7) House Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chair Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19), and Reps. Ami Bera (D-CA-7), Gil Cisneros (D-CA-39), Lou Correa (D-CA-46), Alan Lowenthal (D-CA-47), Grace Meng (D-NY-6), Harley Rouda (D-CA-48), and Maxine Waters (D-CA-43).

Since 1998, more than 17,000 Southeast Asian refugees have been issued a final order of removal, but due to.... Read More

             

National Family Caregivers Month: Strength and Resilience

November is a very special month. It marks the month of Thanksgiving, where millions of families and friends across the United States gather to give thanks, show appreciation for one another, and feast. November also marks National Family Caregivers Month, a time to recognize the people taking care of the ones they love. Although National Family Caregivers Month is not as widely celebrated as Thanksgiving, it is just as important for millions of families across the United States. Along with expressing gratitude for family caregivers, National Family Caregivers Month is a time to highlight the issues of family caregivers, provide resources, and to advocate for supportive policies and programs.

There are many issues that family caregivers.... Read More

             

Mia Frances Yamamoto: Lawyer, Advocate, Hero

November is Transgender Awareness Month. I am so proud to share this video from Mia Frances Yamamoto, who transitioned at the age of 60 to be her true self.

I call her my radical warrior friend, not only because of who she is, but because of the work that she does both as an attorney and an advocate for so many marginalized communities. Can you imagine the courage it took to walk into court one day as male and the next day as female? Can you imagine telling all your clients that you are transitioning from male to female and if they are not comfortable you will recommend them to attorneys that you trust?

Not one.... Read More

             

Caregivers Need Support for their Diverse Needs

by Scott Bane, Program Officer, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on The John A. Hartford Foundation’s “What We’re Learning” blog.

Dear Colleagues—

Family caregivers provide an estimated $470 billion in unpaid care each year. All family caregivers need more support, but the diverse needs of family caregivers have not been fully appreciated. Thanks to research supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation, we’re learning a lot more about the diversity of family caregivers in this country and how we can better support them.

Family caregivers are represented in all races, ethnicities, ages, sexualities, gender.... Read More

             

Chinese Elders Face Hurdles to Settle in America

by Bella Chen. This article originally appeared in Sampan Newspaper. To read this story in Chinese, click here.

Imagine this: You live where you were born and raised for almost 30 years. You have a comfortable life with your wife, your child and your parents in your own house. You heard your neighbor hopped on the boat to America to start a business there. You hear about the American Dream: A place that you could make more money and where you could give your family a better life. You want to go, but people say how it is risky to give up your properties for a place far from home. You don’t.... Read More

             

NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Li Yi Li

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Li Yi Li, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Li Yi, coming from China, shares her transition to.... Read More

             

The importance of LGBT love, identity, and history in October and all year long

October is LGBTQ History Month, and here are two stories from the Asian Pacific Islander LGBTQ community that capture some of their history. Both of these individuals are over 60 years of age.

Bill Tashima lives in Seattle, Washington where he moved so he could live more freely as a gay man.

“I thought that if anybody ever found out [that I was gay], I would have to kill myself.”

To see Bill’s full story, click here.

 

Desiree Thompson is a lesbian who moved from Hawaii to San Francisco for love.

“Maybe I would have been okay as a married woman with children living the heteronormative life, but perhaps there would have been.... Read More

             

Moving Mountains for Family Caregivers in Southeast Asian American Communities

An event hosted by the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) is always sure to be filled with thoughtful, inspirational, and powerful moments, but none as powerful as the Diverse Elders Coalition’s family caregiving presentation at this year’s Moving Mountains Equity Summit in Sacramento, CA. I was thrilled to be able to share some of the preliminary findings of our family caregiving research, which has been generously supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation. After months of collecting surveys and conducting focus groups, it was exciting and satisfying to be able to share the results of our work with an audience of people most impacted by the programs and policies that will.... Read More

             

Immigrant elders seek housing options to age in community

by Ling-Mei Wong. This article originally appeared in Sampan Newspaper.

Hong Lok House means “healthy and happy” house in Cantonese, where elders can live in Chinatown for less than $500 a month on average. A full range of culturally and linguistically sensitive programs provided by management and providers make it a safe and welcoming home for elderly to age in place. Services include home care, health care and a hot meal delivered to the homes.

“There is seldom a vacancy at Hong Lok House,” said Ruth Moy, executive director of the Greater Boston Chinese Golden Age Center, which runs Hong Lok House. “The only time a vacancy opens up is when the elderly can no longer.... Read More

             
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