To Be Seen

My memories from childhood are extremely hazy. Most of what I can recall are fleeting feelings: the bliss in skipping around my Kindergarten classroom as I sang about the days of the week, the joy in jumping up and down on my parents’ bed as I watched “David the Gnome,” the curiosity in having accidentally swallowed a piece of gum, the preceding anxiety and subsequent relief in remembering my steps for a dance recital. Practically all my childhood firsts are long forgotten; I cannot recollect the first book I ever read by myself, or the first tooth I lost, or the.... Read More

             

For Aging Immigrants, Food from Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness

by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared on The Bold Italic.

“Do you have drumsticks?” my 85-year-old mother asks the cashier at the checkout counter at Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, California. The woman points to a pile of long, narrow, cylindrical vegetables near the counter. A half-hour later, a quick inventory of my mother’s cart reveals drumsticks, taro roots, squash, long beans, okra, winter melons, pointed gourd, snake gourd, spices, snack packets of murukkus and a bag of brown basmati rice.

Food bought, cooked, served and eaten is collectively the barometer of my mother’s moods, which are intricately entangled with her health. When she’s bustling around the kitchen, cooking sambar, kootuor olan with squash and winter melon,.... Read More

             

Vietnamese Death Anniversaries Unite Young and Old

By Christine Nguyen, MD. This story originally appeared on KALW FM’s “Crosscurrents.

In 2006, my Mom had a dream. Grandma sat above her, perched on a black stone wall so high her feet didn’t touch the floor. “Mother,” Mom called, “You’re up so high. You might fall to your death.”

A phone call interrupted Mom’s dream. It was her brother. Their mother was dead. “Sister,” he added, “I’ve made Mother a tombstone. Black. Granite from India.”

Ancestor worship is the most common religious practice in Vietnam. It’s called Đạo Ông Bà, or “belief in Grandfather and Grandmother.” When a Vietnamese parent dies, the children make an altar in their homes for the parent’s spirit to live. The practice is.... Read More

             

A Mouthful of Pain for Older People: Sen. Cardin Introduces Medicare Dental Benefit

by Viji Sundaram. This article originally appeared in India West.

When Sanjog Kaur could no longer bear the pain around her upper molar that had been bothering her for months, she took a needle-nose pliers from her husband’s toolbox one recent day, sterilized it in boiling water, rocked the offending tooth back and forth a few times and yanked it out of her mouth. Then she put a sterilized cotton ball in the gap to suck up the blood

“I was scared, but I had no other option,” said the 70-year-old Indian American resident of the Bay Area, who asked that her real name not be used. “A visit to the dentist has always set us.... Read More

             

Differences in NYC’s Chinese Elders End-of-Life Care Preferences

By April Xu. This article originally appeared in the Sing Tao Daily.

Scholars at Fordham University in New York presented their recent research on Chinese seniors’ perspectives about advance directives and end-of-life (EOL) preferences at the Gerontological Society of America (GSA) 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting, held in Boston in November. Because most studies on this subject “treat Asians as one group,” the researchers differentiated Mandarin and Cantonese speakers to discern any differences in their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward end-of-life care.

The researchers said their preliminary findings show that the 150 Chinese elders who spoke Mandarin have somewhat higher knowledge about and more positive attitudes towards having a health care proxy to make decisions for them, should.... Read More

             

Ocean Le: Giving back to the older adults who have impacted my life

Please kindly allow me to introduce myself as Ocean Le, an aspiring health professional with the goal to improve the lives of older adults and their families. My interest in the field is embedded in the rich foundation of knowledge that has not been fully understood by the public. As a first-generation student of two immigrant parents, I have seen the detrimental effects of limited access to health care both domestically and internationally. This has inspired me to improve access to both health care and health care information – empowering people involved in the process of care.

My interest began in Honolulu, Hawaii, as an intermediate student at a Roman Catholic School. As a section 8 housing kid, I was.... Read More

             

NAPCA Gives Thanks!

As 2018 comes to an end with the start of the holiday season, we at the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) take time to pause, reflect and give thanks as we are grateful for so many things: our experienced Board of Directors for their sound leadership, our hardworking and talented staff for their dedication to supporting Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) elders in aging with dignity and integrity, our many community partners for their commitment to providing excellent direct services and last but not least, our funders and individual donors for their trust and support in NAPCA’s mission and values.

Through continued funding from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S..... Read More

             

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging Appoints New CEO

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: October 18, 2018
Contact: Ty Ma’ae, (206) 624-1221
tyrell@napca.org

National Asian Pacific Center on Aging Appoints New CEO

[Seattle, WA] – The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) today announced that its Board of Directors has appointed Joon Bang as President and Chief Executive Officer, effective November 1, 2018, to lead the only national organization working to serve Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) as they age. He replaces Wesley Lum after Koya Leadership Partners conducted an extensive nationwide executive search over the summer.

“We’re very excited to have Joon join NAPCA to continue.... Read More

             

National Employ Older Workers Week (NEOWW) Now and Forever!

The last full week in September is celebrated annually as “National Employ Older Workers Week,” (#NEOWW) recognizing the vital role older workers play in the workforce. Aiming to increase awareness of this labor force and develop strategies to expand opportunities for older workers, we at the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) use this time to celebrate older workers and their contribution to the workforce in the past, the present and the future.

According to U.S. Department of Labor statistics, the United States is undergoing a dramatic demographic shift. The average median age of the U.S.... Read More

             

Chinese elders ‘walk the middle path’ to better mental health

by Liz Tung and Jad Sleiman. This article was originally published by WHYY.

It’s a Friday morning, and the Selfhelp Benjamin Rosenthal Senior Center in Flushing, Queens is bustling with activity.

In one room, around two-dozen Asian seniors are practicing tai chi. Nearby, another group rehearses an opera, their voices rising above the reedy twang of traditional Chinese instruments.

But Jane Qiu, the program director here, says Selfhelp’s seniors weren’t always so engaged.

“By observation, I can see some members, when they came here, were so sad and just crying,” Qiu says. “And now they are just involved in all activities, smiling. You can see their faces here, just fewer couch potatoes.”

Selfhelp is one of 25.... Read More

             

The Coming Generational Diversity in the Workforce

While most of Congress is in recess during the month of August, the conference circuit is in full swing. Hot off the heels of n4a’s 43rd Annual Conference & Tradeshow at the beginning of the month, Dr. Eun Jeong Lee, National Asian Pacific Center on aging (NAPCA) Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) National Director, will again partner with national SCSEP grantees to discuss best practices of the Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP) in serving mature workers and how generational diversity benefits employers.

Dr. Lee and partners are attending the 2019 National Home & Community Based Services (HCBS) Conference in Baltimore this week, sponsored by the National Association.... Read More

             
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