Coronavirus-Related Xenophobia Against People of Asian Heritage Must Stop

by Maya Nakamura. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

All my life, I have been fortunate enough to never feel the need to question or fear how my identity is perceived by others. As a proud daughter of Asian immigrants, I have always worn my Japanese heritage on my sleeve, happy to share and educate others about my experiences – even if it means fending off the occasional ignorant or offensive remark.

However, recently these ‘occasional’ remarks have increased ten-fold and evolved from ignorant to outright hateful. Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) which originated in Wuhan, China, Asians around the globe have experienced an influx of.... Read More

             

Managing the COVID-19 Crisis for Vulnerable Populations

by Vivian Nava-Schellinger and Jenna McDavid. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging (NCOA) blog.

We want to hear how COVID-19 is impacting your community. Please take a moment to answer this short anonymous survey.

Last week, more than 1,600 older adults and professionals in aging attended our tele-town hall event. (Listen to the recording here.) It was a wonderful—and easily accessible—way to share valuable information from national and community partners working with us to and lessen feelings of uncertainty about issues.... Read More

             

Life at the Intersection: Older Adults Need a Response to COVID-19 Grounded in Equity

by Denny Chan. This article originally appeared on the Justice in Aging blog.

Dorothy is in good spirits, but tired and growing increasingly impatient. In January – well before life for most Americans had been dramatically disrupted by COVID-19 with stay at home orders and the shut down of non-essential businesses – the 72-year-old Chinese American living in Seattle, Washington’s Chinatown began to see signs that her community’s life was slowing down. She’d been reading the daily headlines in the Chinese newspaper about the virus in Wuhan and other parts of China. But.... Read More

             

NAPCA Launches Automated In-Language Helpline and Website for Older Adults and Caregivers in Response to COVID19

Dear friends,

As COVID-19 began moving through our communities, the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) immediately initiated conversations with multiple levels of government to ensure the needs of older adults and their caregivers from the Asian American and Pacific Islander populations were being addressed. While we are still continuing our conversations, we recognized the importance of providing access to in-language information and disseminating them through multiple resources. Addressing language barriers and lack of access to information are priorities for us.

In direct response to these priorities, we are launching our automated in-language Helpline and website. The.... Read More

             

NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Cecilia Wu

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Cecilia Wu, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Cecilia Wu, formerly lived in Japan and Taiwan, shares her.... Read More

             

Death and Dying: A Filipino American Perspective

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared on AsAmNews.

The concept of family is strong in Filipino culture. As far as I can remember, growing up both in San Francisco, then in Quezon City, Philippines, to attend school, I always heard the phrase, “Blood is thicker than water.”

Having close family ties is one of the outstanding cultural values that Filipinos have. The family takes care of each other and is taught to be loyal to family and elders by simply obeying their authorities. Having fondness for family reunions during secular and religious holidays, such as Christmas, New Year’s Eve, All Saints’ Day, All Souls Day, Holy Week, Fiestas, homecomings, birthdays, weddings, graduations, baptisms, and funerals, is.... Read More

             

CAPAC Discusses Alarming Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations under Trump

WASHINGTON, DC – Last week, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) held a Congressional Forum on the Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations. Members of Congress in attendance included CAPAC Chair Judy Chu (D-CA-27), CAPAC Immigration Task Force Chair Pramila Jayapal, (D-WA-7) House Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chair Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19), and Reps. Ami Bera (D-CA-7), Gil Cisneros (D-CA-39), Lou Correa (D-CA-46), Alan Lowenthal (D-CA-47), Grace Meng (D-NY-6), Harley Rouda (D-CA-48), and Maxine Waters (D-CA-43).

Since 1998, more than 17,000 Southeast Asian refugees have been issued a final order of removal, but due to.... Read More

             

National Family Caregivers Month: Strength and Resilience

November is a very special month. It marks the month of Thanksgiving, where millions of families and friends across the United States gather to give thanks, show appreciation for one another, and feast. November also marks National Family Caregivers Month, a time to recognize the people taking care of the ones they love. Although National Family Caregivers Month is not as widely celebrated as Thanksgiving, it is just as important for millions of families across the United States. Along with expressing gratitude for family caregivers, National Family Caregivers Month is a time to highlight the issues of family caregivers, provide resources, and to advocate for supportive policies and programs.

There are many issues that family caregivers.... Read More

             

Mia Frances Yamamoto: Lawyer, Advocate, Hero

November is Transgender Awareness Month. I am so proud to share this video from Mia Frances Yamamoto, who transitioned at the age of 60 to be her true self.

I call her my radical warrior friend, not only because of who she is, but because of the work that she does both as an attorney and an advocate for so many marginalized communities. Can you imagine the courage it took to walk into court one day as male and the next day as female? Can you imagine telling all your clients that you are transitioning from male to female and if they are not comfortable you will recommend them to attorneys that you trust?

Not one.... Read More

             
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