Vaccination Rates Among American Indians

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Immunization against childhood diseases is regarded as one of the greatest public health achievements in the United States and worldwide. The benefit of vaccinations has been particularly notable for American Indian and Alaska Native people, who have suffered disproportionately from infectious diseases compared with the general U.S. population. Vaccination coverage among American Indian children is higher than national coverage levels for most vaccines. This finding contrasts with overall coverage estimates among all American Indians, which usually are slightly below national coverage levels.

From 2006 to 2010, CDC researchers reported that although disparities existed between white and American Indian and Alaska Native populations in 2001 to 2004, the findings from the latest surveys showed.... Read More

             

NICOA Creates COVID-19 Tribal Needs Assessment

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

The National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA) invites you to participate in our COVID-19 tribal needs assessment. Your participation will positively impact the wellbeing of American Indian and Alaska Native elders.

As the leading national Native aging organization for elders, we strive to provide information that will assist tribes and their communities. The information we gather will help us better understand how tribes have been affected by COVID-19 and the mental, physical and social impact it has had on their health. It will also serve to illustrate what Indian Country looks like to those who do not know, and help us focus our efforts most effectively.

Once the information is collected and.... Read More

             

NICOA Celebrates Native Elders with Live Webinar

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Commemorate National Native American Heritage Month with the National Indian Council on Aging’s live webinar, “A Celebration of Native Elders“. Join us November 10, 1-3 p.m. EST, as we recognize the many sacrifices, contributions and achievements of American Indian elders, as well as celebrate our rich and vibrant cultures. The event will include music, multiple raffles, stress-busting tips, simple at-home exercises and more.

The webinar will feature American Indian Development Expert Sherry Salway Black, speaking on the subject of “Native Wealth: So Much More than Money”. You’ll also hear from Sixtus Dominguez, a tribal injury prevention program coordinator at the Albuquerque Area Southwest Tribal Epidemiology Center, who will talk about.... Read More

             

Over 1.5 Million American Indians Aren’t Registered to Vote

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog

There are 4.7 million American Indians who are of voting age, according to a report titled “Obstacles at Every Turn: Barriers to Political Participation Faced by Native American Voters.” However, only 66 percent of those eligible to vote are registered. Over 1.5 million Native people are eligible to vote but remain unregistered. American Indians face specific barriers to political participation throughout the voting process.

Both non-traditional mailing addresses and housing insecurity make it difficult to provide proof of residence in a state or county. The report also lists several other factors that prevent Native people from starting the first step of registration: voter identification requirements, unequal access to online registration due.... Read More

             

Shortchanged Shawnee Tribe Sues U.S. Treasury

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog

The Shawnee Tribe, which is headquartered in Miami, filed a federal lawsuit against U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last month, alleging the tribe was stiffed about $6 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act relief funds. The federal treasury had based its distribution on a database that incorrectly listed the Shawnee Tribe’s tribal enrollment as zero when it actually has 3,021 tribal citizens, the lawsuit states.

In the Shawnee Tribe’s federal lawsuit, which was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma, the tribe claims the U.S. Treasury Department disregarded the tribe’s population data and instead used HUD Indian Housing Block Grant data that doesn’t count.... Read More