COVID-19, aging, dementia and social bonds; an Arab American perspective

By Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared on Arab American News

 

DEARBORN, Mich. – COVID-19 has been a difficult ordeal for Sylvana Berry, 24, and her family. Berry is extremely close to, and has been directly involved in the care of her grandmother, Samira Baghdadi, who has Alzheimer’s Disease.

Baghdadi migrated to the U.S. in 1976 with her husband and six children, escaping from the Lebanese Civil War. She ran a resale shop in Detroit with her family.

Things changed for the large but tight-knit family once they learned their beloved matriarch was having trouble remembering things. Back in 2007, it was Berry and her sister Selena who noticed changes in their grandmother, like when she would get lost on her.... Read More

             

8 Warning Signs of Health Problems in Your Aging Parents

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

As your parents get older, how can you be sure they’re taking care of themselves and staying healthy?

When you visit your aging parents, start by considering these questions:

1. Are your parents able to take care of themselves? Pay attention to your parents’ appearance. Failure to keep up with daily routines—such as bathing and brushing teeth—could indicate dementia, depression or physical impairments. Also pay attention to your parents’ home. Are the lights working? Is the heat on? Is the yard overgrown? Any changes in the way your.... Read More

             

Innovative Center Improves Alzheimer’s Awareness Through Contextual Research on Arab Americans

by Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared in The Arab American News.

DEARBORN HEIGHTS — The Michigan Center for Contextual Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease (MCCFAD) is a newly formed Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR), housed at the University of Michigan and funded by the National Institute on Aging.

The center partners with Michigan State University, Wayne State University and Eastern Michigan University to address issues that surround Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD). It shares what is known about ADRD to create awareness, share resources and ultimately promote good health and well-being. It especially engages with the Middle Eastern/Arab American (ME/AA) communities in Metro Detroit and Latino communities in Grand Rapids.

As part of its.... Read More

             

Recent State of the Union Highlights Unfinished Work on Paid Family Leave

By Jason Resendez and Stephanie Monroe of UsAgainstAlzheimer’s.

During the State of the Union, President Trump touted his administration’s progress on expanding paid leave for parents who work for the federal government. According to the President, “As we support America’s moms and dads, I was recently proud to sign the law providing new parents in the Federal workforce paid family leave, serving as a model for the rest of the country.” While this accomplishment is undoubtedly worthy of praise, it also highlights the unfinished work of establishing a comprehensive paid leave policy that values diverse forms of caregiving, from the cradle to later life. 

Our nation’s 41 million family caregivers remain shamefully undervalued, even as our.... Read More

             

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s wants to know: What Matters Most?

“What Matters Most?”

If you are a person living with dementia or a family member of a person with dementia, has anyone ever asked you this question? Unfortunately for many people, the answer is “no.”

Now UsAgainstAlzheimer’s A-LIST® is asking.

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s is an advocacy and research-focused organization working to speed a cure for Alzheimer’s disease. Critical to this work is addressing brain health disparities impacting communities of color through community engagement, advocacy, and research partnerships. This is an essential focus for the organization given the growing impact of Alzheimer’s on communities of color. In fact, by 2030, nearly 40% of all Americans living with Alzheimer’s will be Latino or African American.

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s.... Read More

             

Perla Rosales-Garay, M.D., Inspires Her Community Through Exercise and Alzheimer’s Education

This article originally appeared on the Alzheimer’s Association website.

Dr. Perla Rosales-Garay began working at The University of California in 1997, promoting health and nutrition for people living with diabetes. Today she dedicates her time to her patients and to children and older adults in the Hispanic/Latino community, providing free educational classes that focus on healthy living.

In the community of South Bay, San Diego, Dr. Rosales was teaching the Hispanic/Latino population about nutrition, working to educate her neighbors about how to prevent coronary heart disease and hypertension. “When I started teaching a painting course, I incorporated nutritional education through the products we snacked on during the class. I found that this simple act promoted eating.... Read More

             

I Forgot — And Maybe That’s Okay

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

“I have been forgetting things for years, but now I forget in a new way. I used to believe I could eventually retrieve whatever was lost and then commit it to memory. Now I know I can’t possibly. Whatever’s gone is hopelessly gone. And what’s new doesn’t stick.”

This passage is just one of many favorites from Nora Ephron’s final book, I Remember Nothing — a 161-page testament to the fact that as we age, our memories.... Read More

             

Building an Age- and Dementia-Friendly California

By Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

I am proud and honored to announce that I have been invited by Governor Newsom and former California First Lady Maria Shriver to join the Governor’s Alzheimer’s Prevention and Preparedness Task Force. The Task Force consists of 29 members. It is a diverse group of formal and informal experts— caregivers, health service providers, researchers, policy experts, advocates, affected families and media professionals. The Task Force is charged with developing a plan that will work for all Californians living with Alzheimer’s and for the people who care for them.

For the last seven years, I have had the opportunity to advocate for, and.... Read More

             

Culturally Competent Supports for Diverse Family Caregivers: Spotlight on Volunteers of America Minnesota-Wisconsin

This article was written for the Diverse Elders Coalition by Resources for Integrated Care.

Nearly one in four older adults dually eligible for Medicare and Medicaid has Alzheimer’s disease or related dementia, and dually eligible older adults have higher rates of chronic conditions than Medicare-only beneficiaries. Caring for individuals with dementia and other chronic conditions often involves significant physical, emotional, and financial support from family members. To meet the needs of family caregivers, providers and health plans may benefit from strategies for supporting caregivers through services such as respite services, counseling, and training and education.

Family caregivers come from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds, and health plans report.... Read More

             

Recording Available for Health Disparities Webinar with the All of Us Research Program

In case you missed our webinar on health research and health disparities with the All of Us Research Program, a recording of this webinar is now available here. Just enter your name and email address and you will be able to watch the full presentation at any time!

This webinar was rich, informative, and inspiring. Thank you to our co-presenters:

Christina Pacheco JD, Director of Policy, National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) Keisha Lewis OT, Program Coordinator, National Caucus and Center on Black Aging (NCBA)

And thank.... Read More

             

Middle Income Older Adults Need New Policies and Programs That Will Work for Them

by Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

Joan and Lucy are members of an increasing population of older adults in their 70s and 80s who will need some type of assistance to support them to age in place. Joan is a retired teacher and her partner Lucy is a retired social worker.

Joan told me, “We always planned on traveling after retirement. There are so many places we haven’t been, and we wanted to visit all of them. But then Lucy developed Alzheimer’s, and everything changed. We took some great trips at the beginning of the disease. We enjoyed every minute of our time together. It.... Read More

             

Vietnamese immigrants care for parents with dementia, amidst stigma

 

by Christine Nguyen, MD. This story originally aired on KALW Public Radio.

It was August 24, 2017, one day before Hurricane Harvey, a category 4 hurricane, hit Houston and dumped more water than any storm ever recorded in United States history. In just a few days, Houston saw as much rain as it usually saw in a year. My brother picked up our dad, who was 82, at his house, where he lived alone, and they evacuated to higher ground. They rode out the storm in the countryside. My brother’s in-laws had gotten 10 pounds of ground beef and made enough chili to last through the storm. This is.... Read More

             
Page 1 of 3123