“About 40 million family caregivers provide about $470 billion annually in unpaid care to their loved ones”

Building on the findings presented in the 2017 Status of Hispanic Older Adults: Insights from the Field – Caregivers Edition, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), has developed a number of recommendations for local, state, and national leaders.

NHCOA forwards the following recommendations to better support Hispanic/Latino older adults by ensuring adequate training and care for their caregivers, and would like to urge and encourage members of Congress to support these important pieces of legislation that impacts their older Hispanic constituency:

Bipartisan passage of R.947 and S.337, the Family and Medical Insurance Leave Act (the FAMILY Act). Bipartisan passage of S 1028, the Recognize, Assist, Include, Support, and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Act.

“Latino.... Read More

             

Alzheimer’s Association and the National Hispanic Council on Aging collaborate to educate Latino communities, increase access to Alzheimer’s information and resources

This press release was issued by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) on September 16, 2017.

The Alzheimer’s Association and the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) announced today a nationwide partnership aimed at increasing Alzheimer’s disease awareness and education in Latino communities across the country.

The partnership will develop a network of health promoters to deliver Alzheimer’s education in Latino communities, while connecting people living with the disease and their caregivers to free resources and support services offered through the Alzheimer’s Association. The health promoters will help bridge cultural and linguistic barriers.... Read More

             

Latinos & Alzheimer’s: Empowering Communities Through Culture

The names of friends and family members become harder to remember. You might forget how to tie your shoes or have difficulty dressing in the morning. You might find yourself lost in places that you have known your entire life or be confused by what day of the week it is. These are some of the early signs of Alzheimer’s, a progressive brain disease impacting millions of Americans — and hitting women and communities of color especially hard. 

In fact, Latinos are 1.5 times more likely to develop Alzheimer’s or a related dementia than non-Latino whites, and a report from LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s and the USC Roybal Institute on Aging projects the number of Latinos living with.... Read More

             

Breaking stigmas, creating awareness, and increasing age-sensitive education are three key elements to improve the lives Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers

This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) continues its work by looking for strategies that amplify the voices of thousands of families facing Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, so their specific needs can be included in the decision-making process across public health.

Latinos face a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias because they are not only living longer (2.5 years longer than whites and 8 years longer than blacks), but they also face severe health disparities, including high levels of hunger, higher rates of type 2 diabetes incidence and complication rates, and lack of access to health insurance.

Around 18% of Hispanic.... Read More

             

Brain Health & Inequality: Reflections on the Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity

The 2017 Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity brought together a diverse mix of policymakers, thought leaders, social entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and practitioners to address the nation’s widening opportunity gap. Tucked between to-be-expected panels on manufacturing and hunger, was a 15 minute talk by Dr. Sarah Enos Watamura, Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Denver and Director of the Child Health & Development Lab, on the biology of adversity. She opened by posing the question: How could a consideration of biology inform policy and practice solutions for moving families from inequality to opportunity?

Dr. Watamura highlighted research by.... Read More

             

Ending the Disparate Impact of Alzheimer’s Disease on African Americans

monroe-233x300by Stephanie Johnson Monroe, Director of the African American Network Against Alzheimer’s. This article originally appeared on the LEAD Coalition website. The LEAD Coalition is a diverse and growing national coalition of more than 90 member organizations committed to overcoming Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. To learn more, click here.

African Americans experiencing health disparities is not new. In fact, according to former Surgeon General of the United States and Honorary Chair of the African American Network Against Alzheimer’s, Dr. David Satcher, race based health disparities in the United States are both “pervasive and persistent,”.... Read More

             

Every Minute Counts

Every 66 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease; every minute, a family is changed forever. In the coming decades, the number of Latino families impacted by this progressive brain disease will grow dramatically due to an increase in the Latino older adult population and higher rates of of diabetes and heart disease, both risk factors for Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

According to a recent report by the USC Roybal Institute on Aging and the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Network, the number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia could reach 1.1 million by 2030 and cost Latino families as much as $30 billion annually. However, Latinos are less likely to receive an.... Read More

             

U.S. Latinos And Alzheimer’s Disease: A Looming Crisis

This blog originally appeared on the Huffington Post.

by William Vega and Daisy Duarte. William is a Provost Professor and Director, USC Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Daisy is an advocate for the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Network and an Alzheimer’s caregiver.

NYU clinical professor Yvonne Latty never expected the hardships faced as a caregiver for her mother living with Alzheimer’s. From the 24/7 care to the rising medical bills, the experience has been overwhelming. Her attempts to access a diagnosis and treatment for her mother in the Bronx left her angry, frustrated and confused. A doctor smugly suggested Yvonne “Google” her mother’s condition and devise a plan for her with the help of URLs.

.... Read More
             

Two Stories from the Frontlines of Millennial Caregiving

As Alzheimer’s and brain awareness month comes to a close, I want to highlight two powerful stories that underscore trends that deserve greater attention: the growing impact of Alzheimer’s on communities of color and the growth of the millennial caregiver.

UsAgainstAlzheimer’s recently partnered with Genius of Caring, a web-based initiative that documents the growing impact of Alzheimer’s and dementia on families, to present the story of Kamaria Moore, 30, and her mother Mary, who was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s at the age of 58. Kamaria is a new homeowner, recently engaged, and solely responsible for her mother’s intensive care.

Kamaria’s experience highlights the growing impact of dementia on African Americans, a community three times more.... Read More

             

One Advocate’s Journey: Fighting Alzheimer’s Through Awareness and Research

As the director of the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Coalition, I’m thrilled when we can work hand-in-hand with our members to raise awareness of dementia and Alzheimer’s among their constituents, staff, and partners. That’s why I’m pleased to share our most recent collaboration with the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the nation’s oldest civil rights volunteer-based organization.

daisy

LULAC News – the organization’s membership magazine – sat down with LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s advocate Daisy Duarte to learn more about Alzheimer’s impact on Latinos and about her role as a caregiver advocate and a clinical trial participant.

You’re also one.... Read More

             
Page 1 of 212