SEARAC Launches Solidarity Resource Hub in Support of the Movement for Black Lives and SEAA leaders

This article originally appeared on the SEARAC website.


On June 19, 1865, more than 250,000 African Americans enslaved in Texas were notified of their freedom, two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. One hundred fifty five years later, on the anniversary of what we now celebrate as Juneteenth, SEARAC stands in solidarity with the Black community in honoring this important history and to fight in defense of Black lives.

Inspired by the important work Southeast Asian American, Asian American, and Pacific Islander leaders are spearheading.... Read More

             

Why People of Color Feel the Loneliest at Work

by Leslie Hunter-Gadsen. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(In February 2020, Next Avenue published an article about the Cigna survey, Loneliness and the Workplace 2020 U.S. Report. Among its findings, based on a survey of 10,441 adults: African-American and Hispanic workers feel lonelier than whites. The black and Hispanic workers surveyed were more likely than whites to say they felt abandoned by coworkers when under pressure at work and more alienated from coworkers. Below, Leslie Hunter-Gadsden provides a follow-up, with insights about the racial loneliness-at-work divide and what could reduce it. Cigna did not supply someone to be interviewed for this article when requested. — The Editors)

In the Cigna loneliness at work.... Read More

             

8 Warning Signs of Health Problems in Your Aging Parents

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

As your parents get older, how can you be sure they’re taking care of themselves and staying healthy?

When you visit your aging parents, start by considering these questions:

1. Are your parents able to take care of themselves? Pay attention to your parents’ appearance. Failure to keep up with daily routines—such as bathing and brushing teeth—could indicate dementia, depression or physical impairments. Also pay attention to your parents’ home. Are the lights working? Is the heat on? Is the yard overgrown? Any changes in the way your parents.... Read More

             

Poor, Older Black Americans are an Afterthought in the COVID-19 Crisis

by Christina N. Harrington. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick recently said that he and other older Americans would be willing to risk death due to the coronavirus in order to protect the U.S. economy. What followed was a backlash by people warning that even the thought of sacrificing the elderly is unacceptable. Of even greater concern, though, is what this agenda would mean for poor, older black Americans — people like my 89-year-old grandmother — who already are an afterthought in this country and stand to be impacted the most by the pandemic.

America has always had a problem with those at the margins. Individuals with intersectional marginalized identities.... Read More

             

Supporting Black Futures During Black History Month by Ending Diabetes Disparities

African American older adults are disproportionately affected by diabetes, which affects more than 10% of African American adults. Without proper management, diabetes may increase the risk for other diseases including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

One way to understand this concept is to think about how sticky sugar becomes when you caramelize it in a frying pan. This is the same process that occurs in our arteries, since the average internal temperature of the human body is 98.6°F. As our arteries are filled with this “sticky sugar,” our heart needs to work harder to.... Read More

             

7 HIV/AIDS Myths We Need to Stop Believing

by Kellee Terrell. This article appears on the Diverse Elders Coalition blog courtesy of Black Health Matters.

I try to live my life by the saying “knowledge is power.”

Knowledge helps us make informed decisions from everything, including who we vote for, what we eat and how we react to our surroundings. This mantra also holds true to our understanding (or lack thereof) of HIV/AIDS. Despite how easily accessible basic information about the epidemic is, there’s still plenty of dangerous misinformation percolating out in the world and our communities.

And I’ve seen it with my.... Read More

             

OPINION: A Call to Older Black Men: It’s Time to Fight for Youth

By Raymond A. Jetson. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Just a few weeks ago, 24 African-American teenage boys from a local high school in my Baton Rouge, La. community were recommended for suspension. Their crime: participating in a “fight club.” They were not involved in street fights, nor was there any intent to harm anyone. They were simply donning boxing gloves and boxing in locker rooms and restrooms after school.

These young men are now being held accountable for decisions that were made without the benefit of wise counsel. Where were the African-American.... Read More

             

The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As an Activist for Health Reform

On January 15, 1929, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King’s family always knew that he was special, but no one knew how special he would turn out to be, with his influence still being felt today. As one of the most prominent leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King united Americans to fight racism and oppression via civil disobedience and nonviolent protesting. What is less well known about Dr. King is that his vision for a better America included abolishing health injustice.

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhuman.” — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We seldom talk about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s.... Read More

             

The Double Whammy for Older, Low-Wage Workers With Chronic Conditions

by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Sixty percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, such as heart disease or diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic diseases are even more common among older, low-income adults and minorities. But when Kendra Jason, a sociology professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studied workplace supports for older, low-income black workers with chronic conditions, she found some serious problems.

Jason, who specializes in issues of work and inequality, interviewed 10 female and five male black workers at an urban university in the Southeast who were 50 and older, had two or more chronic conditions and earned.... Read More

             
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