Older Californians and the State of the State

by Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

California Governor Gavin Newsom in his State of the State address on February 12 spoke to the issue of the aging of the state’s population. “We need to get ready.… For the first time in our history, older Californians will outnumber young children.” In fact, California’s population of older adults is projected to increase by four million people by 2030. The state’s newly elected governor announced his commitment to establish a Master Plan for Aging to meet the needs of California’s.... Read More

             

National Hispanic Council on Aging to Host Tele Town Hall on Caregiving

Providing assistance for older generations is a source of great cultural pride within Hispanic communities, and what motivates Hispanics to become caregivers to their older adults is familiarismo, their cultural values that are passed on from generation to generation. However, more than 40% of these caregivers reported feeling stressed and even overwhelmed by the caregiving responsibility.

More than 9 million Latinos, 21% of the estimated 40 million family caregivers in the U.S., are caring for a family member without receiving any type of compensation.

Their average income is $39,000 per year, well below the national average of $54,700. This represents a challenge when.... Read More

             

Why we care about visits to Capitol Hill (and you should too)

by Howard Bedlin. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging blog.

When our partners travel to the nation’s capital, the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Public Policy and Advocacy team strongly encourage them to schedule Hill visits.

We often get questions about why these office visits are so important and how they work. In advance of our 2019 Age+Action Conference, which will feature a Hill Day, we’re planning a series of educational webinars to discuss Hill visits and to help make your visit successful.

Register now for our webinar! Thursday,.... Read More

             

New Congress begins slowly, but seniors’ priorities remain on the docket

by Marci Phillips. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

The 35-day partial government shutdown that occurred during December and January was the longest government shutdown on record, and it hampered many aspects of the government’s work on behalf of older adults. While the government is back at work, Congress must pass a funding bill by February 15th. The National Council on Aging‘s Public Policy and Advocacy team are monitoring the negotiations and the shutdown’s effects on benefits and services that older adults rely on.

Only 5 of the 12 FY19 appropriations.... Read More

             

Inadequate Data on Missing, Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls

by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

TRIGGER WARNING: If reading this post triggers past traumas, please see the resources listed at the end of this article for assistance.

There is a serious lack of meaningful government data documenting rates of missing and murdered indigenous women and girls. A recent study by the Urban Indian Health Institute (UIHI) revealed that only 116 of the 5,712 cases of murdered or missing Native women were logged into the Department of Justice’s nationwide database.

U.S. attorneys’ offices declined to proceed with.... Read More

             

Protecting Southeast Asian American Families

In a recent essay published in AAPI blog Reappropriate, Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) executive director Quyen Dinh recounted what is what like for her to grow up poor and not know it.

In elementary school, my day started with getting breakfast from the cafeteria window, where I got to choose a cereal box along with a small carton of milk from our cafeteria lady, Angie.  She had short curly silver hair and always happily provided us our breakfast, along with a great smile.

For lunch, I lined up with the rest of my classmates to get lunch from Angie, too. Each of us carried a small envelope with our names on it.

I didn’t realize,.... Read More

             

Major Steps toward Affordable Housing in Austin, Texas

by Pramod Sukumaran. This article originally appeared on Salud America.

Access to safe, affordable housing is a priority for good health.

Access to housing protects families and promotes feelings of security that can reduce stress. Affordable housing located near safe parks, full-service grocery stores, and living-wage employment helps to build community and encourages healthy eating and exercise.

Two new initiatives will try to help solve the lack of affordable housing in Austin, Texas (34.5% Latino).

$250 Million for Affordable Housing

In November 2018, Austin voters overwhelmingly approved a $250 million bond for affordable housing.

Here’s where the.... Read More

             

SEARAC Toolkit Sheds Light on Public Charge Proposal

The Trump Administration has proposed broadening the set of government services considered when determining whether an individual is a ‘public charge,’ a term applied to someone who is likely to rely on government assistance for support. If a person is considered a public charge, they may be denied a green card.

Seniors and parents of U.S. citizens are a significant, and growing, segment of immigrants to the U.S. and are critical to the well-being of intergenerational families. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of immigrants age 65 and older grew from 2.7 million to nearly 5 million. The number of parents of U.S. citizens who have been admitted as legal permanent residents more than tripled between 1994 and 2016. In making it.... Read More

             
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