Full Circle

By Mandy Diec. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

In 1991, my family and I arrived in California as part of the final wave of refugees resettling in the United States after the Vietnam War. My dad has retold this story many times. I loved these stories as a child because the focus was always on the lighter, amusing parts of the story, like when my parents tossed away a diaper they were given on the plane because they had no idea what it was, rather than the heavier reality of leaving the traumas of war and persecution* and beginning the fear and anxiety of acculturating and assimilating in this new, adopted country.

We.... Read More

             

Meet the faces behind SAGE’s HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

On June 12, SAGE officially announced the formation of the new HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition (HAPAC). Generously funded by Gilead’s HIV Aging Positively Initiative, the coalition aims to build a dynamic, diverse, and long-term survivor driven group. HAPAC’s mission is focused on publicly acknowledging, drawing much-needed attention to, and meeting the needs of long-term survivors and LGBT older people living with HIV. This coalition is driven by long-term survivors working alongside representatives from some of our country’s leading HIV and aging advocacy organizations and community and grassroots-based organizations. Below, meet the members of the coalition and learn more about their work:

TEZ.... Read More

             

SCOTUS Decision Sparks Community to Continue the Fight

By Randi Robertson. This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

Overjoyed doesn’t really cover it! On June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States of America affirmed that I, a retired USAF Officer/Pilot who voluntarily served 22 years to protect and defend the constitution, who happens to be transgender, is actually protected from work place discrimination under Title VII of the civil rights act.

The past several years have been like walking through a dark tunnel as the current White House and Administration has systematically tried to erase transgender people like myself. The most recent actions to erase protections for LGBTQI people in the arena of healthcare treatment, by changing Affordable Care Act.... Read More

             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom.... Read More

             

SEARAC 2020 Census: Voices from the Vietnamese Community

This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

Luke Kertcher
ESL Teacher, Aldine Independent School District
Houston, TX

Back in March as part of #StatsinSchools week, SEARAC Census Ambassador (and former intern) Luke Kertcher, an ESL teacher based in Texas, designed a scavenger hunt and trivia activity about the census. “We were able to learn and discuss more about why the census is important, especially for our immigrant and refugee communities,” he said. “I also distributed flyers in my students’ home languages—Spanish and.... Read More

             

Aging Out Loud: From Generation to Generation

by Renée Markus Hodin. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

We want to pay tribute to a leader with whom many Health Policy Hub readers may not be familiar: Nelson Cruikshank. Nelson was a longtime leader in the labor movement who was instrumental in creating two of the most important programs for vulnerable older adults and people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare.

Born in 1902, Nelson grew up to become a Methodist minister and, later, a union organizer. After a series of jobs in the federal government – including one setting up camps for migrant farm workers, a program later made famous in John Steinbeck’s novel, The Grapes of.... Read More

             

Why People of Color Feel the Loneliest at Work

by Leslie Hunter-Gadsen. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(In February 2020, Next Avenue published an article about the Cigna survey, Loneliness and the Workplace 2020 U.S. Report. Among its findings, based on a survey of 10,441 adults: African-American and Hispanic workers feel lonelier than whites. The black and Hispanic workers surveyed were more likely than whites to say they felt abandoned by coworkers when under pressure at work and more alienated from coworkers. Below, Leslie Hunter-Gadsden provides a follow-up, with insights about the racial loneliness-at-work divide and what could reduce it. Cigna did not supply someone to be interviewed for this article when requested. — The Editors)

In the Cigna loneliness at work.... Read More

             
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