2020 Census Overlooks Caregivers

by Kayla Sawyer. This article originallu appeared on the NICOA blog.

The 2020 Census fails to ask two important questions that affect more than 43.5 million Americans. The missing questions address whether a U.S. resident is a caregiver for an adult family member or a disabled child and whether a resident is receiving care from a family member.

Although the 2020 Census does include questions about grandparents caring for their grandchildren (up to age 18) in their homes, there’s no Census Bureau on family caregivingAccording to estimates.... Read More

             

The Movement For Indigenous Peoples’ Day

This content was originally published by NPR. Click here to listen to the Latino USA podcast.

In the U.S., the second Monday in October is reserved for Columbus Day, in honor of the Italian navigator Christopher Columbus.

But not everyone is on board with celebrating Columbus. His colonization of the “new world” led to the bloodshed of Indigenous people and while he did arrive to the Americas, he never set foot in North America. So how did this federal holiday in the U.S. come to be?

Over the past few decades, there has been a growing local movement in cities and states throughout the country, to officially replace the federal holiday of Columbus Day with a.... Read More

             

Celebrating National Disability Employment Awareness Month

In addition to being Hispanic Heritage Month, LGBT History Month, and Filipino American History Month, October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). This month, we celebrate the contributions of workers with disabilities and educate everyone about the value of a workforce inclusive of their skills and talents. This year’s theme, “The Right Talent, Right Now,” emphasizes the critical role people with disabilities have in America’s economy.

In 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that people with disabilities make up 19.1% of the employed population. It is clear that people with disabilities.... Read More

             

Moving Mountains for Family Caregivers in Southeast Asian American Communities

An event hosted by the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) is always sure to be filled with thoughtful, inspirational, and powerful moments, but none as powerful as the Diverse Elders Coalition’s family caregiving presentation at this year’s Moving Mountains Equity Summit in Sacramento, CA. I was thrilled to be able to share some of the preliminary findings of our family caregiving research, which has been generously supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation. After months of collecting surveys and conducting focus groups, it was exciting and satisfying to be able to share the results of our work with an audience of people most impacted by the programs and policies that will.... Read More

             

Helping Older Immigrants Understand the Public Charge Rule

by Vivian Nava-Schellinger, Associate Director, Strategic Partnerships & External Affairs, National Council on Aging

Right now, there are more than 1.1 million immigrants aged 62 and older who are living at or below 250% of the Federal Poverty Level. While there are thousands of public benefits programs designed to help them pay for daily needs — such as food, medicine, and health care — recent changes to the “public charge” rule have added a layer of complexity for these individuals in need.

“Public charge” or the “public charge test” is used by immigration officials to determine whether a.... Read More

             

Immigrant elders seek housing options to age in community

by Ling-Mei Wong. This article originally appeared in Sampan Newspaper.

Hong Lok House means “healthy and happy” house in Cantonese, where elders can live in Chinatown for less than $500 a month on average. A full range of culturally and linguistically sensitive programs provided by management and providers make it a safe and welcoming home for elderly to age in place. Services include home care, health care and a hot meal delivered to the homes.

“There is seldom a vacancy at Hong Lok House,” said Ruth Moy, executive director of the Greater Boston Chinese Golden Age Center, which runs Hong Lok House. “The only time a vacancy opens up is when the elderly can no longer.... Read More

             

Honoring older adults living with HIV on National HIV and Aging Awareness Day

Every year on September 18th, National HIV and Aging Awareness Day reminds us of the growing number of long-term survivors of the HIV/AIDS crisis and the increasing numbers of older adults living with HIV. We are honored to share stories from older adults like Vince Crisostomo, Hank Trout, and Helena Buschong, who are living with HIV and documenting their journeys along the way.

The year 2020 has long been noted as a pivotal time for the demographics of people aging with HIV:.... Read More

             

New Data Show ACA Is Reducing Racial Disparities in Health Coverage

by Dara S. Taylor. This article originally appeared on the Community Catalyst blog.

Since the passage of the ACA over 20 million people have gained access to health insurance coverage through the Marketplace. A recent issue brief from the Commonwealth Fund reaffirms that substantially lowering uninsurance rates nationwide has also led to reductions in racial and ethnic disparities in health coverage. The health coverage gains have been most pronounced for minority groups and individuals with incomes below 139 percent of the federal poverty level.

Before the passage of the ACA, Latinx people had the highest initial uninsurance rate. Black people also had higher initial uninsurance rates than whites. Therefore, a reduction of.... Read More

             
Page 1 of 2212345...1020...Last »