What Matters? Don’t Let Health Care Get in the Way

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When it comes to health care, what matters varies from person to person and differs depending on your state of health or illness. For one person, it might mean feeling well enough to care for an active young grandchild three days a week. For another person nearing the end of life, it might mean alleviating pain or being lucid enough to have one more conversation.

However, when we near death or become seriously ill.... Read More

             

Deportees with Few-to-No Options in Mexico

by Jacqueline García. This article was originally published on La Opinión. To read the original article in Spanish, click here. ||  por Jacqueline García. Este artículo fue publicado originalmente en La Opinión. Para leer el artículo original en español, haga clic aquí.

Manuel Ramirez tried to endure the pain and discomfort while he was cleaning an open wound on his left knee on a Sunday afternoon in December. He said about two months prior he had surgery but hasn’t healed.

Quite the opposite, his knee was swollen and seemed to need medical care. However, Ramirez, 52, couldn’t ask for immediate care because he lives in a tent in a park in Tijuana,.... Read More

             

An impact that transcends generations: Older adults also suffer the consequences of immigration policies

This article originally appeared on Mundo Hispánico. To read the original article in Spanish, click here.

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Lucia Hernandez Soto gets the tortillas ready for the traditional “pozole” soup for Saturday with the meticulous attention to detail and gentle touch that she learned back in her small hometown. As she heats the shredded chicken to add to the soup, she takes the hominy to pour in the pot. An avocado that will garnish the day’s lunch peeks over the corner of the kitchen counter.

For this Mexican woman who arrived from Guerrero some 20 years ago, “pozole” is one of the dishes that fill her most with pride. Her greatest concern.... Read More

             

A Mouthful of Pain for Older People: Sen. Cardin Introduces Medicare Dental Benefit

by Viji Sundaram. This article originally appeared in India West.

When Sanjog Kaur could no longer bear the pain around her upper molar that had been bothering her for months, she took a needle-nose pliers from her husband’s toolbox one recent day, sterilized it in boiling water, rocked the offending tooth back and forth a few times and yanked it out of her mouth. Then she put a sterilized cotton ball in the gap to suck up the blood

“I was scared, but I had no other option,” said the 70-year-old Indian American resident of the Bay Area, who asked that her real name not be used. “A visit to the dentist has always set us.... Read More

             

Older Californians and the State of the State

by Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

California Governor Gavin Newsom in his State of the State address on February 12 spoke to the issue of the aging of the state’s population. “We need to get ready.… For the first time in our history, older Californians will outnumber young children.” In fact, California’s population of older adults is projected to increase by four million people by 2030. The state’s newly elected governor announced his commitment to establish a Master Plan for Aging to meet the needs of California’s.... Read More

             

National Hispanic Council on Aging to Host Tele Town Hall on Caregiving

Providing assistance for older generations is a source of great cultural pride within Hispanic communities, and what motivates Hispanics to become caregivers to their older adults is familiarismo, their cultural values that are passed on from generation to generation. However, more than 40% of these caregivers reported feeling stressed and even overwhelmed by the caregiving responsibility.

More than 9 million Latinos, 21% of the estimated 40 million family caregivers in the U.S., are caring for a family member without receiving any type of compensation.

Their average income is $39,000 per year, well below the national average of $54,700. This represents a challenge when.... Read More

             

Why we care about visits to Capitol Hill (and you should too)

by Howard Bedlin. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging blog.

When our partners travel to the nation’s capital, the National Council on Aging (NCOA) Public Policy and Advocacy team strongly encourage them to schedule Hill visits.

We often get questions about why these office visits are so important and how they work. In advance of our 2019 Age+Action Conference, which will feature a Hill Day, we’re planning a series of educational webinars to discuss Hill visits and to help make your visit successful.

Register now for our webinar! Thursday,.... Read More

             

New Congress begins slowly, but seniors’ priorities remain on the docket

by Marci Phillips. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

The 35-day partial government shutdown that occurred during December and January was the longest government shutdown on record, and it hampered many aspects of the government’s work on behalf of older adults. While the government is back at work, Congress must pass a funding bill by February 15th. The National Council on Aging‘s Public Policy and Advocacy team are monitoring the negotiations and the shutdown’s effects on benefits and services that older adults rely on.

Only 5 of the 12 FY19 appropriations.... Read More

             
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