Getting diverse elders ready for the 2020 Census


Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

It’s 2020, which means the United States Census is coming! By April 1, every home in the United States will receive an invitation to participate in the census, our once-in-a-decade opportunity to ensure that our communities are counted. Census results help determine how billions of dollars in federal funding flow into states and communities each year, and the results determine how many seats in Congress each state gets. To ensure that diverse elders, their families, and their caregivers are given.... Read More

             

Diverse Elders Coalition receives $1,199,763 in renewed funding from The John A. Hartford Foundation to support diverse family caregivers

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 23, 2019

Contact: Jenna McDavid, National Director
646-653-5015 / jmcdavid@diverseelders.org

New York, NY – The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) has been approved for a two-year, $1,199,763 grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation to implement the programs and solutions the coalition has developed to support diverse family caregivers. This grant builds off the DEC’s previous planning grant, awarded by The John A. Hartford Foundation in 2018, to identify and address the unique needs of family caregivers in racially and ethnically diverse communities, American Indian and Alaska Native communities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT) communities. Through the planning grant, the DEC has been able to.... Read More

             

New Bill Restores Due Process Protections for Immigrants with Criminal Records

Asian Americans Advancing Justice and Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) applaud the introduction of the New Way Forward Act by U.S. House Reps. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, Pramila Jayapal, Karen Bass, and Ayanna Pressley.

The New Way Forward Act advances the national conversation on immigrants with a criminal record by restoring due process protections for all immigrants, including immigrants in deportation proceedings. Key components of the bill include the below provisions:

Eliminating mandatory detention Ending deportations based for certain convictions Restoring judicial discretion for immigration judges Creating a five-year statute of limitations for deportability Establishing an opportunity to come home for certain deported individuals or non-citizens in deportation proceedings

In particular, the restoration of judicial discretion for.... Read More

             

CAPAC Discusses Alarming Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations under Trump

WASHINGTON, DC – Last week, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) held a Congressional Forum on the Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations. Members of Congress in attendance included CAPAC Chair Judy Chu (D-CA-27), CAPAC Immigration Task Force Chair Pramila Jayapal, (D-WA-7) House Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chair Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19), and Reps. Ami Bera (D-CA-7), Gil Cisneros (D-CA-39), Lou Correa (D-CA-46), Alan Lowenthal (D-CA-47), Grace Meng (D-NY-6), Harley Rouda (D-CA-48), and Maxine Waters (D-CA-43).

Since 1998, more than 17,000 Southeast Asian refugees have been issued a final order of removal, but due to.... Read More

             

You Shouldn’t Need a Golden Ticket to Stay Mobile as You Age

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Perhaps no movie has better staying power than Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Many of us raised our children — and now our grandchildren — on the 1971 hit. In a movie filled with iconic scenes, one that really resonates with me involves Charlie’s four grandparents.

It’s hard to forget Grandpa Joe being confined to a bed, as life in the house goes on around him. He’s seemingly living out his later years as a passive.... Read More

             

Homeownership in Indian Country

by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Expanding affordable homeownership is a central component to sustainable economic and community development. Yet on many reservations, homeownership remains an unexplored option. For several generations, housing stock on American Indian reservations has been limited and deficient, adding to the already dire housing crisis throughout Indian Country.

According to the Census Bureau, in 2016, just 52.9 percent of all Native people were homeowners, down from 55.5 percent in 2000. Yet in tribal areas, 75 percent report a strong desire to own their home.

.... Read More
             

National Native American Heritage Month

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

National Native American Heritage Month is a time to recognize the histories, invaluable contributions and livelihood of American Indian and Alaska Native people in the United States. It is an opportunity to educate the general public about tribes, their cultures, traditions and languages. Use this time to highlight the unique challenges Native people have faced both historically and presently, as well as the ways in which tribal citizens have overcome these challenges.

One of the earliest proponents of a day honoring American Indians was Dr. Arthur Caswell Parker,.... Read More

             

Cultural competence is the key to trust and respect between clients and direct care workers

Dear Colleague,

Resources for Integrated Care (RIC) has developed a series of briefs, described and linked below, to help long-term services and support (LTSS) providers, administrators, and other stakeholders, support a diverse direct care workforce that can meet the cultural needs and preferences of dually eligible beneficiaries. These resources contain information and promising practices related to organizational cultural competence in LTSS provider settings, training culturally competent direct care workers, and recruiting and retaining a diverse direct care workforce.

Click here to access the direct care workforce briefs.

Nearly.... Read More

             
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