Supporting Black Futures During Black History Month by Ending Diabetes Disparities

African American older adults are disproportionately affected by diabetes, which affects more than 10% of African American adults. Without proper management, diabetes may increase the risk for other diseases including cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, and Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

One way to understand this concept is to think about how sticky sugar becomes when you caramelize it in a frying pan. This is the same process that occurs in our arteries, since the average internal temperature of the human body is 98.6°F. As our arteries are filled with this “sticky sugar,” our heart needs to work harder.... Read More

             

7 HIV/AIDS Myths We Need to Stop Believing

by Kellee Terrell. This article appears on the Diverse Elders Coalition blog courtesy of Black Health Matters.

I try to live my life by the saying “knowledge is power.”

Knowledge helps us make informed decisions from everything, including who we vote for, what we eat and how we react to our surroundings. This mantra also holds true to our understanding (or lack thereof) of HIV/AIDS. Despite how easily accessible basic information about the epidemic is, there’s still plenty of dangerous misinformation percolating out in the world and our communities.

And I’ve seen it with.... Read More

             

Aging in Massachusetts is Getting Harder

by Tibisay Zea. This article originally appeared in El Planeta, New England’s Spanish-language newspaper. Haga clic aquí para leer este artículo en español.

One of the biggest challenges of aging is securing economic stability while productivity progressively decreases. This seems harder to achieve in Massachusetts, as it has the worst financial security numbers for older adults, shows a recent study by the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Massachusetts, Boston (UMass Boston).

More than half of people 65 or older in the state live alone, and a third of those living as a couple do not have enough money to cover their basic needs on their own (housing, transportation, health care.... Read More

             

Cliffs Notes for Growing Old Well

by Peter White. This article originally appeared in the Tennessee Tribune.

A Vanderbilt researcher has taken just about everything you need to know about living well as you age and condensed it into a 36-page pamphlet called “Aging & Injury.” It is a good read, practical, and thorough.

Cathy Maxwell was a bedside nurse for more than 20 years in critical care and trauma. She saw a lot of elderly patients come to the emergency room from falls or car accidents.

“I see these patients come in from an injury and the outcomes of the older patients compared to the younger patients was so different,” Maxwell said. She wanted to find out why.

Luckily for Maxwell,.... Read More

             

OPINION: A Call to Older Black Men: It’s Time to Fight for Youth

By Raymond A. Jetson. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Just a few weeks ago, 24 African-American teenage boys from a local high school in my Baton Rouge, La. community were recommended for suspension. Their crime: participating in a “fight club.” They were not involved in street fights, nor was there any intent to harm anyone. They were simply donning boxing gloves and boxing in locker rooms and restrooms after school.

These young men are now being held accountable for decisions that were made without the benefit of wise counsel. Where were the.... Read More

             

The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As an Activist for Health Reform

On January 15, 1929, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King’s family always knew that he was special, but no one knew how special he would turn out to be, with his influence still being felt today. As one of the most prominent leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King united Americans to fight racism and oppression via civil disobedience and nonviolent protesting. What is less well known about Dr. King is that his vision for a better America included abolishing health injustice.

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhuman.” — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We seldom talk about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s.... Read More

             

Pneumonia Vaccination: Protect yourself by asking the right questions

It’s a new year, and here at the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), we’re resolving to make 2020 the healthiest year yet for NHCOA’s constituents and staff. Hopefully by now you have been vaccinated for influenza and the immunization will keep you healthy over the winter months. Equally important is another vaccine currently available for your protection — the pneumococcal vaccine – which prevents a serious illness, pneumococcal disease or pneumonia.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that pneumonia is just a bad cold or the flu or that it can be prevented with the flu vaccine..... Read More

             

The Double Whammy for Older, Low-Wage Workers With Chronic Conditions

by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Sixty percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, such as heart disease or diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic diseases are even more common among older, low-income adults and minorities. But when Kendra Jason, a sociology professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studied workplace supports for older, low-income black workers with chronic conditions, she found some serious problems.

Jason, who specializes in issues of work and inequality, interviewed 10 female and five male black workers at an urban university in the Southeast who were 50 and older, had two or more chronic conditions and earned.... Read More

             
Page 5 of 39« First...34567...102030...Last »