Cliffs Notes for Growing Old Well

by Peter White. This article originally appeared in the Tennessee Tribune.

A Vanderbilt researcher has taken just about everything you need to know about living well as you age and condensed it into a 36-page pamphlet called “Aging & Injury.” It is a good read, practical, and thorough.

Cathy Maxwell was a bedside nurse for more than 20 years in critical care and trauma. She saw a lot of elderly patients come to the emergency room from falls or car accidents.

“I see these patients come in from an injury and the outcomes of the older patients compared to the younger patients was so different,” Maxwell said. She wanted to find out why.

Luckily for Maxwell,.... Read More

             

OPINION: A Call to Older Black Men: It’s Time to Fight for Youth

By Raymond A. Jetson. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Just a few weeks ago, 24 African-American teenage boys from a local high school in my Baton Rouge, La. community were recommended for suspension. Their crime: participating in a “fight club.” They were not involved in street fights, nor was there any intent to harm anyone. They were simply donning boxing gloves and boxing in locker rooms and restrooms after school.

These young men are now being held accountable for decisions that were made without the benefit of wise counsel. Where were the African-American.... Read More

             

The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As an Activist for Health Reform

On January 15, 1929, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King’s family always knew that he was special, but no one knew how special he would turn out to be, with his influence still being felt today. As one of the most prominent leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King united Americans to fight racism and oppression via civil disobedience and nonviolent protesting. What is less well known about Dr. King is that his vision for a better America included abolishing health injustice.

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhuman.” — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We seldom talk about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s.... Read More

             

Pneumonia Vaccination: Protect yourself by asking the right questions

It’s a new year, and here at the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), we’re resolving to make 2020 the healthiest year yet for NHCOA’s constituents and staff. Hopefully by now you have been vaccinated for influenza and the immunization will keep you healthy over the winter months. Equally important is another vaccine currently available for your protection — the pneumococcal vaccine – which prevents a serious illness, pneumococcal disease or pneumonia.

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that pneumonia is just a bad cold or the flu or that it can be prevented with the flu vaccine. In.... Read More

             

The Double Whammy for Older, Low-Wage Workers With Chronic Conditions

by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Sixty percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, such as heart disease or diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic diseases are even more common among older, low-income adults and minorities. But when Kendra Jason, a sociology professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studied workplace supports for older, low-income black workers with chronic conditions, she found some serious problems.

Jason, who specializes in issues of work and inequality, interviewed 10 female and five male black workers at an urban university in the Southeast who were 50 and older, had two or more chronic conditions and earned.... Read More

             

NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Cecilia Wu

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Cecilia Wu, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Cecilia Wu, formerly lived in Japan and Taiwan, shares her.... Read More

             

What’s Behind My Mother’s Obsession With Food?

by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared in India Currents.

“What did you eat today?” my mother, Sarada, begins her phone conversation with my twenty-three-year-old daughter in New York. When my daughter explains that she made rasam and sautéed cauliflower over the weekend, Sarada’s face lights up. Later she tells me she’s happy that all her grandchildren love rasam, a staple broth from the south of India.

Eighty-six-year-old Sarada immigrated to America in her 70s, and finds equanimity performing activities and engaging in conversations that hinge around food. When she meets people she doesn’t know, she connects through food conversations, often recalling.... Read More

             

Diverse Elders Coalition receives $1,199,763 in renewed funding from The John A. Hartford Foundation to support diverse family caregivers

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 23, 2019

Contact: Jenna McDavid, National Director
646-653-5015 / jmcdavid@diverseelders.org

New York, NY – The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) has been approved for a two-year, $1,199,763 grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation to implement the programs and solutions the coalition has developed to support diverse family caregivers. This grant builds off the DEC’s previous planning grant, awarded by The John A. Hartford Foundation in 2018, to identify and address the unique needs of family caregivers in racially and ethnically diverse communities, American Indian and Alaska Native communities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT) communities. Through the planning grant, the DEC has been able to.... Read More

             

New Bill Restores Due Process Protections for Immigrants with Criminal Records

Asian Americans Advancing Justice and Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) applaud the introduction of the New Way Forward Act by U.S. House Reps. Jesus “Chuy” Garcia, Pramila Jayapal, Karen Bass, and Ayanna Pressley.

The New Way Forward Act advances the national conversation on immigrants with a criminal record by restoring due process protections for all immigrants, including immigrants in deportation proceedings. Key components of the bill include the below provisions:

Eliminating mandatory detention Ending deportations based for certain convictions Restoring judicial discretion for immigration judges Creating a five-year statute of limitations for deportability Establishing an opportunity to come home for certain deported individuals or non-citizens in deportation proceedings

In particular, the restoration of judicial discretion for.... Read More

             
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