Aging Southern Musical Artists Celebrate 25 Years Of Music Maker

by Leoneda Inge, WUNC North Carolina Public Radio (Aug. 6, 2019). Leoneda Inge reports on the Music Maker Relief Foundation, which has helped improve the lives of more than 400 artists for the past 25 years. Listen to the audio report.

The life of an aging blues or folk musician is not always pretty. Many of these old soulsters have not been able to retire with dignity. For the past 25 years, the Music Maker Relief Foundation has worked to improve the lives of these musicians. It has literally saved the lives and the music of more than 400 artists.

Many of these artists are African American and well over regular retirement age. One of them.... Read More

             

Five Wishes: Advance Care Planning for Diverse Communities

This article was written for the Diverse Elders Coalition by Five Wishes.

Rosa was age 85, a widow, and doing great. She enjoyed good health, many friends and was involved in social activities at her church and in her community. Her children and grandchildren would say, only half-jokingly, that Rosa was healthier and more active than any of them and would likely outlive them all. Even her own doctor was impressed that a woman of her age was as alert and physically able as any patient half her age.

It really never occurred to Rosa or Rosa’s family that it might be smart to plan ahead in case she had an accident or suffered a severe.... Read More

             

Artist Wen-ti Tsen reflects on immigration and aging

by Ling-Mei Wong. This article originally appeared in Sampan Newspaper. To read this article in Chinese, click here.

Between art shows and exhibitions, you would never know Wen-ti Tsen is 83 years old.

“Being an artist means not following a set pattern of retiring at 65; nobody ever stops working,” Tsen said. “The older you get, you think better. You have fewer distractions.”

Tsen’s portfolio includes a Chinatown mural of Chinese garment workers, with a model displayed at 38 Ash Street, the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center lobby. His “Home Town” project featured 12 figures of everyday Chinese people from the Chinese Historical Society of New England’s archives, which.... Read More

             

Join the Diverse Elders Coalition for a webinar on health research and diverse populations

On Thursday, August 22nd at 3pm EDT, the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) will host a webinar on health research among diverse populations. We’ll discuss the barriers to access that have prevented communities of color, LGBT communities, American Indian/Alaska Native communities, and others from participating in health research. We’ll also explore the different health conditions and disparities that can be better understood and alleviated through greater participation in biomedical research and the advancement of precision medicine. The webinar will focus on the National Institutes of Health’s All of Us Research Program and the protections.... Read More

             

I Attended a Focus Group with Vietnamese Caregivers. Here are Some of the Things I Learned.

Last month, I had the opportunity to attend a focus group with Vietnamese family caregivers in Houston, Texas. During the focus group, I learned more about their caregiving experiences, their challenges, and the changes they would like to see in the U.S. healthcare system. Here are some of the things I learned.

“Very thankful for my parents, but sometimes it can be hard to please them, especially when dealing with right and wrong because of our cultural values.” – focus group participant

Cultural Values Influences Caregiving Expectations

In the Vietnamese community, traditional values have a big impact on caregivers. Traditional values such as filial piety — respect for one’s parents, elders, and ancestors — influence many Vietnamese caregivers to exclusively.... Read More

             

Cast in Bronze: An Artist’s Legacy

by Mark Ray. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

The ongoing debate over whether to remove Confederate statues in the South (and beyond) demonstrates how public art highlights what a society finds significant. By that measure, Ed Hamilton was pretty insignificant when he was growing up black in the 1950s and 1960s.

All the public art he saw around him in his hometown of Louisville, Ky. depicted white people: Abraham Lincoln at the library, Louis XVI at the courthouse, Henry Clay at city hall. Even the mannequins in downtown department.... Read More

             

Dances With Manangs

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared in Positively Filipino magazine.

My mother looked forward to Sunday because it was a day that she and her friends went to the dance hall in Daly City, located in the park off Acton Street at the Top of the Hill.

If you look back at archived books and film clips on the arrival of Filipinos in America, you will find that the means of socializing were the dances; playing pool in the pool halls; and celebrating birthdays, weddings, and job promotions with a vast amount of Filipino food: lechon; adobo; lumpia; kare-kare; pinakbet; dinuguan; and, of course, pancit.

Today, one can still see the same patterns of.... Read More

             

NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Carmen Mendones

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Carmen Mendones, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Carmen, originally from Manila, Philippines, shares her story.... Read More

             

Take action: Submit a comment to protect health care rights for all

This post originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.


Health is a human right, and that is why we believe that a patient’s health should come first. The Trump Administration has introduced a new proposed rule that would radically reinterpret civil rights protections under the Health Care Rights Law (Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act) for people who are limited English proficient (LEP). This includes changing how US Department of Health and Human Services and federal and state health insurance marketplaces must comply with the law, limiting enforcement of civil rights, and rolling.... Read More

             

As Death Approaches, Older Indian Americans Unprepared for the End

by Viji Sundaram. This article originally appeared on India West.

See the full slide show by Viji Sundaram at https://tinyurl.com/y5kc8fpk

The 88-year-old man looked gray and emaciated, the outline of his collarbones clearly visible under the loose fitting gown he wore as he lay in a narrow hospital bed in an East Bay nursing home. His eyes were closed, his mouth agape. A tube delivered both medicine and food directly into his stomach. He didn’t appear to know what was going on around him.

Nearly two years ago, aspiration pneumonia put Chandra Bhatia (his wife asked that his real name not be used) in the hospital. Since then, other health crises have.... Read More

             
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