Full Circle

By Mandy Diec. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

In 1991, my family and I arrived in California as part of the final wave of refugees resettling in the United States after the Vietnam War. My dad has retold this story many times. I loved these stories as a child because the focus was always on the lighter, amusing parts of the story, like when my parents tossed away a diaper they were given on the plane because they had no idea what it was, rather than the heavier reality of leaving the traumas of war and persecution* and beginning the fear and anxiety of acculturating and assimilating in this new, adopted country.

We.... Read More

             

Hurt on the Job: Older Latino Workers in Oklahoma

By Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell for Telemundo Oklahoma (May 22, 2020). See this video news report in Spanish with English subtitles.

Certain jobs have a higher chance of injury than others. If an injury occurs on the job it can change the affected person’s life forever and that’s why it’s important to have a safety plan for difficult times. Accidents happen even in the safest of jobs. That’s why rules and regulations are set in place.

“Health officials are always reminding us how to conduct ourselves in the safest way along with reminding us to wear our protective equipment,”.... Read More

             

Planning for the Future of Hispanic Elders

By Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell for Telemundo Oklahoma (May 22, 2020). See this video news report in Spanish with English subtitles.

Taking care of loved ones can be very draining. Looking out for the ones you love should be a natural process, but in Hispanic culture it is basically mandatory. Plans need to be set with loved ones for when they can no longer look out for themselves. One of the most difficult decisions a person can make is to leave everything they have built behind to take care of relatives who can no longer take care of themselves.

.... Read More
             

Writing the Poignant New York Times COVID-19 Obituaries

By Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

You can learn in The New York Times how many humans have died from the coronavirus from its Tracking the Coronavirus graphic (472,125 as of June 23, 2020). But to understand the humanity, you need to read The Times’ Those We’ve Lost obituary series.

Dan Wakin, who edits Those We’ve Lost, said he wants its readers to get a sense “of the scope of the pandemic; that it spares no one. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, how educated you are, how brilliant a doctor you are. You can die.”

Beyond that, Wakin said, he also hopes readers will “come away.... Read More

             

SEARAC Launches Solidarity Resource Hub in Support of the Movement for Black Lives and SEAA leaders

This article originally appeared on the SEARAC website.


On June 19, 1865, more than 250,000 African Americans enslaved in Texas were notified of their freedom, two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. One hundred fifty five years later, on the anniversary of what we now celebrate as Juneteenth, SEARAC stands in solidarity with the Black community in honoring this important history and to fight in defense of Black lives.

Inspired by the important work Southeast Asian American, Asian American, and Pacific Islander leaders are.... Read More

             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom.... Read More

             

SEARAC 2020 Census: Voices from the Vietnamese Community

This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

Luke Kertcher
ESL Teacher, Aldine Independent School District
Houston, TX

Back in March as part of #StatsinSchools week, SEARAC Census Ambassador (and former intern) Luke Kertcher, an ESL teacher based in Texas, designed a scavenger hunt and trivia activity about the census. “We were able to learn and discuss more about why the census is important, especially for our immigrant and refugee communities,” he said. “I also distributed flyers in my students’ home languages—Spanish and.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

Riots Before Parades: LGBT Pride Month

There are many ways to write the story of the LGBT civil rights movement. We can start in the 1920s, when the Society of Human Rights was founded, or in 1955 when the Mattachine Society, a secretive group was founded, or with the 1965 gay march in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The LGBT community has been fighting for their civil rights for decades; however, it wasn’t until the 1968 Stonewall Riots that issues facing the LGBT community attracted mass media attention in the US.

The Stonewall Riots ignited unity between many different LGBT groups to take.... Read More

             
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