NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Sannalung Souratha

The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Sannalung Souratha, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

Sannalung shares his story of coming from Laos in a.... Read More

             

Aging Southern Musical Artists Celebrate 25 Years Of Music Maker

by Leoneda Inge, WUNC North Carolina Public Radio (Aug. 6, 2019). Leoneda Inge reports on the Music Maker Relief Foundation, which has helped improve the lives of more than 400 artists for the past 25 years. Listen to the audio report.

The life of an aging blues or folk musician is not always pretty. Many of these old soulsters have not been able to retire with dignity. For the past 25 years, the Music Maker Relief Foundation has worked to improve the lives of these musicians. It has literally saved the lives and the music of more than 400 artists.

Many of these artists are African American and well over regular retirement age. One of them.... Read More

             

Submit a Workshop Proposal for NICOA’s 2020 American Indian Aging Conference!

You are invited to submit a proposal to present at the National Indian Council on Aging’s 2020 American Indian Aging Conference. The conference will be held August 17-20, 2020 in Reno, Nevada at the Nugget Resort & Casino (1100 Nugget Avenue, Sparks, NV 89431).

Reno has been called “the biggest little city in the world” and is often described as a small Las Vegas. Located in northwestern Nevada near the California state line, Reno is the second largest city in the state.

Boasting more than five million.... Read More

             

I Attended a Focus Group with Vietnamese Caregivers. Here are Some of the Things I Learned.

Last month, I had the opportunity to attend a focus group with Vietnamese family caregivers in Houston, Texas. During the focus group, I learned more about their caregiving experiences, their challenges, and the changes they would like to see in the U.S. healthcare system. Here are some of the things I learned.

“Very thankful for my parents, but sometimes it can be hard to please them, especially when dealing with right and wrong because of our cultural values.” – focus group participant

Cultural Values Influences Caregiving Expectations

In the Vietnamese community, traditional values have a big impact on caregivers. Traditional values such as filial piety — respect for one’s parents, elders, and ancestors — influence many Vietnamese caregivers to exclusively.... Read More

             

Dances With Manangs

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared in Positively Filipino magazine.

My mother looked forward to Sunday because it was a day that she and her friends went to the dance hall in Daly City, located in the park off Acton Street at the Top of the Hill.

If you look back at archived books and film clips on the arrival of Filipinos in America, you will find that the means of socializing were the dances; playing pool in the pool halls; and celebrating birthdays, weddings, and job promotions with a vast amount of Filipino food: lechon; adobo; lumpia; kare-kare; pinakbet; dinuguan; and, of course, pancit.

Today, one can still see the same patterns of.... Read More

             

Take action: Submit a comment to protect health care rights for all

This post originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.


Health is a human right, and that is why we believe that a patient’s health should come first. The Trump Administration has introduced a new proposed rule that would radically reinterpret civil rights protections under the Health Care Rights Law (Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act) for people who are limited English proficient (LEP). This includes changing how US Department of Health and Human Services and federal and state health insurance marketplaces must comply with the law, limiting enforcement of civil rights, and rolling.... Read More

             

Live a Healthier Life in Your 60s and Beyond

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

When you reach your 60s, all the issues that arose in your 50s become more extreme.

Your yearly well-woman visit is a good time to check in with your doctor about how you’re doing, how you’d like to be doing and what changes you can make to reach your health goals. In addition to talking with your doctor or nurse about your health, you may also need certain vaccines and medical tests. Don’t worry. You won’t need every test every year.

Younger than 65? Right now a yearly well-woman visit won’t cost.... Read More

             

Dual Stigma: HIV Positive and Over 50

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

HIV/AIDS used to be considered a disease of the young. In the early 1980s, when doctors first reported cases of HIV, nearly 70% of diagnoses were among people under 40.

Fast forward four decades later and more than 50% of Americans with HIV are now over 50. And by 2020 that number is expected to reach 65% to 70%. This is largely due to major medical improvements in the effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in suppressing the virus and transforming HIV from an often fatal.... Read More

             

Detroit’s Water Austerity: Lack of Household Water, Contamination, Potential Public Health Crisis

by Julia Kassem. This article originally appeared on Global Research News.

In 2017, the City of Detroit alone faced 171 cases of hepatitis A. This was more than all the rest of Wayne County with 142 cases, and topped any other county in Michigan. In total, over 500 cases were reported statewide in 2017, including 25 deaths.

Contamination worsens

After Detroit’s major flood spells, namely the devastating flood of August 11, 2014, which caused at least $1 billion in damage, residents waited years for compensation from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), if they received it at all. When FEMA assistance was received, it often barely amounted to a third of total damages. Floods in subsequent.... Read More

             
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