8 Warning Signs of Health Problems in Your Aging Parents

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

As your parents get older, how can you be sure they’re taking care of themselves and staying healthy?

When you visit your aging parents, start by considering these questions:

1. Are your parents able to take care of themselves? Pay attention to your parents’ appearance. Failure to keep up with daily routines—such as bathing and brushing teeth—could indicate dementia, depression or physical impairments. Also pay attention to your parents’ home. Are the lights working? Is the heat on? Is the yard overgrown? Any changes in the way your parents.... Read More

             

LGBTQ Older Adults and Shelter in Place

by Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

These are extraordinary times. It has only been since March 17 that Mayor Breed ordered San Francisco residents to shelter in place, to stay indoors, to slow the spread of infection from COVID-19. We are to remain in our homes and only go out to conduct essential activities such as to buy groceries or for a medically related need. It is not such a simple request to isolate ourselves when information about the virus’ progress and the evolving and sometimes confusing response of the federal government creates a collective feeling of dread and anxiety.

As the economy comes to a standstill, more and.... Read More

             

Managing the COVID-19 Crisis for Vulnerable Populations

by Vivian Nava-Schellinger and Jenna McDavid. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging (NCOA) blog.

We want to hear how COVID-19 is impacting your community. Please take a moment to answer this short anonymous survey.

Last week, more than 1,600 older adults and professionals in aging attended our tele-town hall event. (Listen to the recording here.) It was a wonderful—and easily accessible—way to share valuable information from national and community partners working with us to and lessen feelings of uncertainty about issues.... Read More

             

Life at the Intersection: Older Adults Need a Response to COVID-19 Grounded in Equity

by Denny Chan. This article originally appeared on the Justice in Aging blog.

Dorothy is in good spirits, but tired and growing increasingly impatient. In January – well before life for most Americans had been dramatically disrupted by COVID-19 with stay at home orders and the shut down of non-essential businesses – the 72-year-old Chinese American living in Seattle, Washington’s Chinatown began to see signs that her community’s life was slowing down. She’d been reading the daily headlines in the Chinese newspaper about the virus in Wuhan and other parts of China. But.... Read More

             

NAPCA Launches Automated In-Language Helpline and Website for Older Adults and Caregivers in Response to COVID19

Dear friends,

As COVID-19 began moving through our communities, the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) immediately initiated conversations with multiple levels of government to ensure the needs of older adults and their caregivers from the Asian American and Pacific Islander populations were being addressed. While we are still continuing our conversations, we recognized the importance of providing access to in-language information and disseminating them through multiple resources. Addressing language barriers and lack of access to information are priorities for us.

In direct response to these priorities, we are launching our automated in-language Helpline and website. The.... Read More

             

COVID-19: We Must Care for Older Adults’ Mental Health

by Christine Moutier, Chief Medical Officer, American Foundation for Suicide Prevention. This article originally appeared on the AFSP Lifesaver Blog.

No matter your age, mental health and well-being are influenced by numerous factors and are susceptible to change. Right now, most people, across all sectors of society, are being affected by the global health crisis related to the coronavirus. One particular group we should keep in mind during this challenging time is older adults, whose routines and usual support systems may be disrupted.

The most powerful factors that impact mental health and well-being for older.... Read More

             

Innovative Center Improves Alzheimer’s Awareness Through Contextual Research on Arab Americans

by Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared in The Arab American News.

DEARBORN HEIGHTS — The Michigan Center for Contextual Factors in Alzheimer’s Disease (MCCFAD) is a newly formed Resource Center for Minority Aging Research (RCMAR), housed at the University of Michigan and funded by the National Institute on Aging.

The center partners with Michigan State University, Wayne State University and Eastern Michigan University to address issues that surround Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD). It shares what is known about ADRD to create awareness, share resources and ultimately promote good health and well-being. It especially engages with the Middle Eastern/Arab American (ME/AA) communities in Metro Detroit and Latino communities in Grand Rapids.

As part of its.... Read More

             

Don’t Let Social Distancing Isolate Elders

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Although the implementation of social distancing is necessary to flatten the coronavirus curve and prevent the current pandemic from worsening, the stress of isolation can have an affect on anyone. With elders designated as “high risk,” elders and those supporting them worry that precautions could further isolate this vulnerable community, exacerbating loneliness and stress.

Chronic stress is harmful to your health and can be particularly hazardous for elders. Although it’s difficult to determine the extent to which chronic stress affects the health of elders, there is undoubtedly a correlation.

Here are some articles discussing both the need to stay socially distant.... Read More

             

National Nutrition Month: Highlight on the Elder Index and Food Insecurity

Developed by the Gerontology Institute at the University of Massachusetts Boston, the Elder Index tool is used to measure the income older people need to meet their daily living expenses while staying independent in their own homes. The Elder Index tool is specific to household size, location, housing and health status, unlike the Federal Poverty Level, another index used to assess income level.

Additionally, the Elder Index accounts for the cost of healthcare, transportation, miscellaneous essentials, and food. After attending the webinar “Promoting Better Communities for Older.... Read More

             

Simple Tips for Eating Well

by Cheryl Toner, MS, RDN. This article originally appeared on the blog of the National Council on Aging (NCOA).

There are few things in life as comforting and nourishing as food, but it can be controversial and confusing, too. It’s so essential to life one would think common sense is the main ingredient in making food choices, and common sense—along with personal heritage and beliefs—is an important guidepost. Food cultures around the world can look very different from one another, and each can be healthy. Rather than ignoring food customs and preferences, let’s anchor them.... Read More

             
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