Mia Frances Yamamoto: Lawyer, Advocate, Hero

November is Transgender Awareness Month. I am so proud to share this video from Mia Frances Yamamoto, who transitioned at the age of 60 to be her true self.

I call her my radical warrior friend, not only because of who she is, but because of the work that she does both as an attorney and an advocate for so many marginalized communities. Can you imagine the courage it took to walk into court one day as male and the next day as female? Can you imagine telling all your clients that you are transitioning from male to female and if they are not comfortable you will recommend them to attorneys that you trust?

Not one.... Read More

             

Opportunity for People with Lived Experiences To Improve Treatment and Services for Substance Use Disorders

             

Join a Focus Group!

Community Catalyst and Faces & Voices of Recovery are looking for people to participate in focus groups to help improve treatment and services.

What is the purpose of the groups?
The groups will discuss what results people want most from treatment and services. The information shared will influence future research and action to improve recovery outcomes.... Read More

             

Cultural competence is the key to trust and respect between clients and direct care workers

Dear Colleague,

Resources for Integrated Care (RIC) has developed a series of briefs, described and linked below, to help long-term services and support (LTSS) providers, administrators, and other stakeholders, support a diverse direct care workforce that can meet the cultural needs and preferences of dually eligible beneficiaries. These resources contain information and promising practices related to organizational cultural competence in LTSS provider settings, training culturally competent direct care workers, and recruiting and retaining a diverse direct care workforce.

Click here to access the direct care workforce briefs.

Nearly.... Read More

             

Imani Woody: Building a Home for LGBTQ Older Adults

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Imani Woody’s father left her his home in Washington, D.C. — the one she grew up in ­— when he died in 2010. Faced with the decision of what to do with the house, Woody, a lifelong activist for women, people of color and the LGBGQ community, chose to renovate the house and turn it into the first of hopefully many locations of Mary’s House (named for her late mother). It’s an affordable independent living community for older adults targeting the cultural and relational needs of LGBTQ.... Read More

             

Caregivers Need Support for their Diverse Needs

by Scott Bane, Program Officer, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on The John A. Hartford Foundation’s “What We’re Learning” blog.

Dear Colleagues—

Family caregivers provide an estimated $470 billion in unpaid care each year. All family caregivers need more support, but the diverse needs of family caregivers have not been fully appreciated. Thanks to research supported by The John A. Hartford Foundation, we’re learning a lot more about the diversity of family caregivers in this country and how we can better support them.

Family caregivers are represented in all races, ethnicities, ages, sexualities, gender.... Read More

             

Perla Rosales-Garay, M.D., Inspires Her Community Through Exercise and Alzheimer’s Education

This article originally appeared on the Alzheimer’s Association website.

Dr. Perla Rosales-Garay began working at The University of California in 1997, promoting health and nutrition for people living with diabetes. Today she dedicates her time to her patients and to children and older adults in the Hispanic/Latino community, providing free educational classes that focus on healthy living.

In the community of South Bay, San Diego, Dr. Rosales was teaching the Hispanic/Latino population about nutrition, working to educate her neighbors about how to prevent coronary heart disease and hypertension. “When I started teaching a painting course, I incorporated nutritional education through the products we snacked on during the class. I found that this simple act promoted eating.... Read More

             

I Forgot — And Maybe That’s Okay

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

“I have been forgetting things for years, but now I forget in a new way. I used to believe I could eventually retrieve whatever was lost and then commit it to memory. Now I know I can’t possibly. Whatever’s gone is hopelessly gone. And what’s new doesn’t stick.”

This passage is just one of many favorites from Nora Ephron’s final book, I Remember Nothing — a 161-page testament to the fact that as we age, our memories get.... Read More

             

The Service Partnering With Churches to Help Family Caregivers

by Melba Newsome. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When Altrice Ward’s 82-year-old mother was hospitalized after falling for the third or fourth time, Ward knew she had to face an uncomfortable reality: Her mother could no longer live on her own.

So, despite holding down a full-time nursing job, Ward decided to move her mother in with her and take on the role of caregiver. Even her professional training caring for others did not prepare her for what lay ahead.

“It was eye-opening and more difficult and exhausting than I imagined it would.... Read More

             
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