Maximize Your Virtual Health Care Visit

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Social distancing recommendations have forced us to change the way health care is being delivered. Virtual health care visits allow providers to see patients when coming into the clinic isn’t an option. They help us minimize disease spread, eliminate unnecessary hospital visits and free up resources so people in critical need can be better served.

Virtual health care isn’t new. Telemedicine appointments have been used for years by physicians for post-operative and follow-up appointments, but many of us haven’t taken part in video-based visits. So it stands to reason that some of us might be nervous the first time we have a telehealth visit, especially.... Read More

             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom 25%.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based on age,.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one year.... Read More

             

Open Up Puerto Rico – Exprésate Puertorriqueños

This article originally appeared on the SAGE website. To learn more about Open Up Puerto Rico, click here.

SAGE is proud to partner with the New York City Department for the Aging, Thrive NYC and our SAGE Puerto Rico affiliate at Waves Ahead in a public health campaign for Puerto Rican LGBT elders in New York City and Puerto Rico. The campaign seeks to provide help via SAGE’s National LGBT Elder Hotline in the U.S. and a telephone helpline in Puerto Rico run by SAGE Puerto Rico at Waves Ahead.

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Stay Connected While Social Distancing

by Roslyn Daniels. This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

People all over the world, including Americans, are practicing social distancing during this coronavirus pandemic. We’re sheltering at home, leaving only when necessary to replenish essential supplies or to get in a little exercise. 

Yes, it feels strange, this interruption to our lives and regular routines, but everyone who can stay home should; it saves lives and helps halt the spread of the virus. 

We’re not, however, blind to a byproduct of all this enforced separation: loneliness. A survey of.... Read More

             

Self-Care During the Covid-19 Outbreak

By Michelle Fritsch, PharmD, BCGP, BCACP, and Kathleen Cameron, BS Pharm, MPH. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging (NCOA) blog.

As we’re all navigating a lot of uncertainty, upsetting news, isolation, and grief, all of the self-care activities that were important for staying healthy before the pandemic may be even more critical now. Even though there is a lot of emphasis on COVID-19 right now, your overall health is just as important as any other time. The better controlled your chronic conditions, the better you’ll be able to fight the virus if.... Read More

             

The Case for Racial Equity in Aging Has Never Been Stronger

by Robert Espinoza and Jean Accius. This article originally appeared on the blog of the American Society on Aging.

In early April, as the COVID-19 crisis spread across the world, two notable developments took hold. First, the United States became the pandemic’s epicenter, reporting more confirmed cases and deaths than in any other nation. Second, it became clear that black and Latino people in the United States were being hospitalized and dying from the virus at disproportionate rates.

Given that older adults and people with serious medical conditions are at greatest risk of.... Read More

             
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