LGBT Elders Know There’s Only One Side to Charlottesville

This article originally appeared in The Advocate magazine.

This week, the president made the profoundly misguided and dangerous statement that there are “two sides to the story” of the hate-filled events in Charlottesville, Va.

While it can sometimes be challenging to know what to add to the cacophony of condemnations of hatred and the president’s outrageously inadequate responses, at this moment the wisdom of those who are aged has something essential to say: There are no two sides to the story of white supremacy, neo-Nazism, and the other repugnant forms of hatred advanced by the hundreds of torchbearers who came to defend the statue of Confederate “hero” Robert E. Lee. The only side of the story that we.... Read More

             

Aging as LGBT: Two Stories

by Heron Greenesmith. This post originally appeared on the Justice in Aging blog.

Tina and Jackie were born in the same town in 1947. Despite similar beginnings, their lives take very different turns. In 1967, Tina meets Frank. And Jackie meets Frances. As a same-sex couple, Jackie and Frances couldn’t marry, were denied spousal benefits, and experienced a lifetime of discrimination and lost wages. Fast forward to today, and Jackie, like so many other older adults, struggles with financial insecurity, social isolation, and overall lack of health and well-being, simply because they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT).

Unfortunately, Jackie’s story.... Read More

             

Aggressive Deportation Policies Tear Family Caregivers Away From the Elders Who Depend on Them

Aggressive deportation policies, like those that have been enacted since Trump’s inauguration, tear families apart — including elders and the family caregivers they depend upon. Since 1980, the share of households headed by an immigrant has doubled (from 7% to 14% in 2012). In 2009, 16% of households headed by an immigrant were multi-generational, compared with 10% of households with a U.S.-born head. Many immigrant and refugee elders depend on their grown children for support for daily tasks, emotional support, or even fulltime caretaking. In Cambodian refugee communities, nearly two-thirds of older adults have been found to suffer from PTSD, and nearly all of those who survived.... Read More

             

NAPCA tells Congress about the needs of older Americans in the workforce!

In response to the United States Senate Special Committee on Aging’s Request for Information, the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) delivered comments on the opportunities and challenges facing older adults in the workforce and provided recommendations for policymakers to help older workers.

Almost 20 percent of people over the age of 65 are currently in the workforce, and that number is expected to grow by 74% over the next two decades, making mature workers the largest source of talent in the United States. This changing demographic creates opportunities for employers because older adults who are retired or unemployed have relevant skills to offer and are interested in re-entering the workforce. They tend to be dependable,.... Read More

             

Black, Gray and Gay: The Perils of Aging LGBTQ People of Color

by Chandra Thomas Whitfield. This article originally appeared on NBCNews.com.

Cecelia Hayden Smith, 72, knows exactly how she wants to live out the remainder of her golden years: lounging lazily on the porch of a cozy house tucked along a quiet, treelined street in Washington, D.C.

She’d greet her partner each morning with a homemade country breakfast, and their afternoons and evenings would be filled with lively games of Spades and Bid Whist with a dozen or so housemates — all fellow LGBTQ elders.

“I’ve already picked out my rocking chair,” the retired substance abuse counselor quipped. “Just call me ‘Mama C,’ and make sure my room is in the front, so I can always see.... Read More

             

“We need to ensure that older adults are centered in the LGBT movement.”

We’re continuing our Pride Month series of interviews with staff from SAGE || Advocacy and Services for LGBT Elders. Today, we’re talking with Karalin Sprague, Manager of Lifelong Learning. Kara tells us about the exciting programming for LGBTQ older adults and allies happening at SAGE Centers around the city, and the most moving moments from Pride Month 2017.

What is your role with SAGE?
I’m the Manager of Lifelong Learning, which means that I oversee all of the programming related to art, culture, education, socialization and technology across SAGE’s five New York City sites. I have a bird’s eye view of our programs across the city, so.... Read More

             

When Health Policy Advocacy Doesn’t See Color, It Doesn’t See Me

by Ana Maria De La Rosa. This post originally appeared on the Community Catalyst Health Policy Hub.

Our advocacy around race and health requires us to address racism as a cause of poor health, recognizing that without addressing this root cause, attempts at solving health inequities will continuously fall short. However, in order to bring full awareness to the consequences of racism on health outcomes, we must take a step even further back, and address the ways structural racism is embedded in health policy and health advocacy.

When the foundations for the health advocacy strategies that shape our policies are flawed, we build structures that benefit some people above others. We then spend.... Read More

             

Pride in our Identities Starts at Home: SAGE’s National LGBT Elder Housing Initiative

by Kelly Kent, Director of the National Housing Initiative for SAGE. For more information on SAGE’s National LGBT Elder Housing Initiative, visit http://www.sageusa.org/lgbthousing/ or contact Kelly at kkent@sagusa.org.

A growing proportion of our population is reaching retirement age in the coming years. Baby boomers, those born between the years of 1946 and 1964, began turning 65 in 2011. The age group 65 and older makes up the largest age group in the US and is growing at a faster rate than any other age group. Harvard’s Joint Center for Housing Studies (JCHS) released a report in 2016, which found that “over the next twenty years, the population.... Read More

             

Ships, Bridges, and Barriers: My Family in California

My grandfather passed through the Golden Gate — where the Golden Gate Bridge would later be constructed — in October 1903. He was on a ship from Japan that had stopped in Honolulu. The ship’s manifest notes that he was none of the following: an anarchist, a polygamist or a cripple.

My grandfather arrived in the time between the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the Immigration Act of 1924 (which included the Asian Exclusion Act and the National Origins Act). By 1924 the U.S. government had completely blocked the immigration of people it deemed undesirable including Asians, Arabs, people with disabilities, formerly incarcerated people, people with a history of physical or mental health issues, and the poor — along.... Read More

             
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