The importance of LGBT love, identity, and history in October and all year long

October is LGBTQ History Month, and here are two stories from the Asian Pacific Islander LGBTQ community that capture some of their history. Both of these individuals are over 60 years of age.

Bill Tashima lives in Seattle, Washington where he moved so he could live more freely as a gay man.

“I thought that if anybody ever found out [that I was gay], I would have to kill myself.”

To see Bill’s full story, click here.

 

Desiree Thompson is a lesbian who moved from Hawaii to San Francisco for love.

“Maybe I would have been okay as a married woman with children living the heteronormative life, but perhaps there would have been.... Read More

             

Celebrating National Disability Employment Awareness Month

In addition to being Hispanic Heritage Month, LGBT History Month, and Filipino American History Month, October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). This month, we celebrate the contributions of workers with disabilities and educate everyone about the value of a workforce inclusive of their skills and talents. This year’s theme, “The Right Talent, Right Now,” emphasizes the critical role people with disabilities have in America’s economy.

In 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that people with disabilities make up 19.1% of the employed population. It is clear that people with disabilities.... Read More

             

SAGE Stonewall Veterans Speak: Val Harris

This article is part of a series of profiles of the inspiring SAGE constituents who were part of the Stonewall uprising in 1969, an event that inspired the modern LGBT-rights movement. It was originally published on the SAGE blog.

Charles “Valentino” Harris, known to friends and family simply as Val, was 17 years old the first night of the Stonewall uprising. “On that night in ’69, I was at a disco called the Sanctuary near Times Square with my friend Nelson,” says the native New Yorker. “Someone called the bar, and suddenly word spread that the drag queens were rioting at the Stonewall.” He and.... Read More

             

Take action: Submit a comment to protect health care rights for all

This post originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.


Health is a human right, and that is why we believe that a patient’s health should come first. The Trump Administration has introduced a new proposed rule that would radically reinterpret civil rights protections under the Health Care Rights Law (Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act) for people who are limited English proficient (LEP). This includes changing how US Department of Health and Human Services and federal and state health insurance marketplaces must comply with the law, limiting enforcement of civil rights, and rolling.... Read More

             

Detroit’s Water Austerity: Lack of Household Water, Contamination, Potential Public Health Crisis

by Julia Kassem. This article originally appeared on Global Research News.

In 2017, the City of Detroit alone faced 171 cases of hepatitis A. This was more than all the rest of Wayne County with 142 cases, and topped any other county in Michigan. In total, over 500 cases were reported statewide in 2017, including 25 deaths.

Contamination worsens

After Detroit’s major flood spells, namely the devastating flood of August 11, 2014, which caused at least $1 billion in damage, residents waited years for compensation from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), if they received it at all. When FEMA assistance was received, it often barely amounted to a third of total damages. Floods in subsequent.... Read More

             

How a Slavery Legacy Made This 65-Year-Old a Georgetown Undergrad

by Richard Harris. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

It’s been nearly 14 years since Hurricane Katrina washed away all the physical mementos of Mélisande Short-Colomb’s life along the Mississippi Gulf coast.  Her nearly 200-year-old Pass  Christian, Miss., house and everything in it was gone in an instant — the family Bible, every photograph, document and piece of furniture, including the rocking chair with the baby bite marks that had been in her family for generations.

“Nobody was hurt. But we were all hurt. We survived,” says Short-Colomb, 65, the emotional scars still quite.... Read More

             

Voices From the Stonewall Era

By Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Multiple conflicting accounts exist of what happened June 28, 1969 at 53 Christopher St. in Greenwich Village. And really, the Stonewall Inn rebellion in New York City that day is just one piece of what really sparked the modern LGBTQ movement across the nation. Here are stories of three men who — at Stonewall that night or elsewhere — have deep connections to an era of painful protest, discrimination and liberation:

“Jeremiah, They’re Raiding the Stonewall”

Unlike “everyone in the world,” Greenwich Village-dweller Jeremiah Newton didn’t attend Judy Garland’s funeral on June 28, 1969. He didn’t really know her; he only saw her in passing at.... Read More

             

The Nation’s Largest LGBTQ-Inclusive Affordable Housing for Older Adults

This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When applications opened for New York City’s first affordable housing property for LGBTQ older adults recently, 1,000 people eagerly sent theirs in on that first day.

This underscores a genuine need. Not only is New York City increasingly unaffordable, but LGBTQ older adults run up against pervasive barriers when trying to find a place to live.

A 2014 report by the Equal Rights Center found that near half of LGBTQ couples applying for senior housing were subjected to discrimination, and a quarter of transgender older adults report housing.... Read More

             

A New Project Aims to Make Residential Care More LGBT-Friendly

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

Two months after my mother entered a nursing home at age 73, she made a firm request to the home’s administration: add a Spanish-language channel to the lineup being offered throughout the facility. They obliged, lightening an otherwise grueling life transition for my mother, and her room soon filled with the sounds of programs she had watched much of her adult life. While it was a relatively modest concession on behalf of the nursing home, this decision was profoundly important to my mother. In the context of long-term care, it embodied the “person-centered” philosophy that has become increasingly common in this sector, affirming that individuals across the spectrum.... Read More

             

Pride Month: Caregiving in LGBT Communities

It is estimated that 10,000 adults turn 65 and older everyday. Amidst an aging population and shrinking healthcare workforce, caregivers play a crucial role in the long-term care of older adults, accounting for more than 85% of all elder care in the US. According to a 2015 study by AARP, it was estimated that there are 34.2 million Americans are providing care to another person who is over the age 50.

The number of caregivers in the United States is expected to grow alongside the older adult population. Caregivers provide physical, psychological, and emotional care for another person who may be a family member, friend, or a partner. The act of providing care can be very fulfilling, but as a.... Read More

             
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