Full Circle

By Mandy Diec. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

In 1991, my family and I arrived in California as part of the final wave of refugees resettling in the United States after the Vietnam War. My dad has retold this story many times. I loved these stories as a child because the focus was always on the lighter, amusing parts of the story, like when my parents tossed away a diaper they were given on the plane because they had no idea what it was, rather than the heavier reality of leaving the traumas of war and persecution* and beginning the fear and anxiety of acculturating and assimilating in this new, adopted country.

We.... Read More

             

SCOTUS Decision Sparks Community to Continue the Fight

By Randi Robertson. This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

Overjoyed doesn’t really cover it! On June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States of America affirmed that I, a retired USAF Officer/Pilot who voluntarily served 22 years to protect and defend the constitution, who happens to be transgender, is actually protected from work place discrimination under Title VII of the civil rights act.

The past several years have been like walking through a dark tunnel as the current White House and Administration has systematically tried to erase transgender people like myself. The most recent actions to erase protections for LGBTQI people in the arena of healthcare treatment, by changing Affordable Care Act.... Read More

             

As An HIV Survivor, COVID-19 Stigma Is Sadly Familiar

by John-Manuel Andriote. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Elizabeth Martucci figured it made perfect sense to share the exciting news that she and her 11-year-old son had recovered from COVID-19. The New Jersey resident even had “COVID-19 Survivor” T-shirts made.

Martucci didn’t anticipate the response she’d get to being a survivor — and the sometimes jarring lengths to which some will go because of their fear. As The New York Times reported in a story about Martucci, “Even now, a month into their recovery, some neighbors see them and run.”

.... Read More
             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

Riots Before Parades: LGBT Pride Month

There are many ways to write the story of the LGBT civil rights movement. We can start in the 1920s, when the Society of Human Rights was founded, or in 1955 when the Mattachine Society, a secretive group was founded, or with the 1965 gay march in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia. The LGBT community has been fighting for their civil rights for decades; however, it wasn’t until the 1968 Stonewall Riots that issues facing the LGBT community attracted mass media attention in the US.

The Stonewall Riots ignited unity between many different LGBT groups to take.... Read More

             

Why People of Color Feel the Loneliest at Work

by Leslie Hunter-Gadsen. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(In February 2020, Next Avenue published an article about the Cigna survey, Loneliness and the Workplace 2020 U.S. Report. Among its findings, based on a survey of 10,441 adults: African-American and Hispanic workers feel lonelier than whites. The black and Hispanic workers surveyed were more likely than whites to say they felt abandoned by coworkers when under pressure at work and more alienated from coworkers. Below, Leslie Hunter-Gadsden provides a follow-up, with insights about the racial loneliness-at-work divide and what could reduce it. Cigna did not supply someone to be interviewed for this article when requested. — The Editors)

In the Cigna loneliness at work.... Read More

             

Undocumented Latino Seniors Struggle Without Pensions, Health Insurance

by Agustin Durán. To read the original Spanish-language article in La Opinión, click here. (Para leer este artículo en español, haga clic aquí.)

Estela García is not intimidated. She walks a lot, eats as healthfully as possible and stays positive. In general, this is the recipe that has allowed her, at the age of 84, to stay healthy. As an undocumented immigrant, living in the midst of one of the world’s most frightening pandemics, self-care and a positive outlook are what keeps her going.

“I just don’t panic,” she emphasized, but I don’t watch television either.” : “The news exaggerates so much that people believe everything and do not reflect on the veracity of what they hear.... Read More

             

The Case for Racial Equity in Aging Has Never Been Stronger

by Robert Espinoza and Jean Accius. This article originally appeared on the blog of the American Society on Aging.

In early April, as the COVID-19 crisis spread across the world, two notable developments took hold. First, the United States became the pandemic’s epicenter, reporting more confirmed cases and deaths than in any other nation. Second, it became clear that black and Latino people in the United States were being hospitalized and dying from the virus at disproportionate rates.

Given that older adults and people with serious medical conditions are at greatest risk.... Read More

             
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