Factors that Worsen Cancer in Diverse Communities

Cancer remains one of the most dangerous diseases that affects millions of people. It is projected by 2020 that the leading cause of death in the United States will transition from heart disease to cancer. In some of our diverse communities, this transition has already happened. For both Asian American and Latinx communities, cancer is the leading cause of death. Similarly, African Americans are also significantly affected by cancer with 200 deaths per 100,000 African Americans. The effects of cancer in our diverse communities become even more alarming when examining individual cancers, such as breast cancer or prostate cancer. Breast.... Read More

             

The Economics of Healthy Aging for Women

by Kerry Hannon. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

I recently attended a Milken Institute Future of Health Summit panel in Washington, D.C. called Race, Gender, and Work: The Economics of Healthy Aging. The experts’ insights whizzed across a range of topics from caregiving to investing and jobs, but there was one common thread: the critical financial issues facing women. I was especially struck by the particular challenges they noted for women of color and low-income women.

“Whether you look at women through the lens of their labor force participation, pay equity, health participation or financial security, women are challenged to live the lives that are healthy, wealthy and secure, and to.... Read More

             

An impact that transcends generations: Older adults also suffer the consequences of immigration policies

This article originally appeared on Mundo Hispánico. To read the original article in Spanish, click here.

$bp("Brid_43519841", {"id":"14404", "width":"867","height":"487","video":"336590", "autoplay":0,"shared":true});

Lucia Hernandez Soto gets the tortillas ready for the traditional “pozole” soup for Saturday with the meticulous attention to detail and gentle touch that she learned back in her small hometown. As she heats the shredded chicken to add to the soup, she takes the hominy to pour in the pot. An avocado that will garnish the day’s lunch peeks over the corner of the kitchen counter.

For this Mexican woman who arrived from Guerrero some 20 years ago, “pozole” is one of the dishes that fill her most with pride. Her greatest concern.... Read More

             

Aging African Americans are hit with a double-whammy: health and financial troubles

by Rodney Brooks. This article originally appeared in USA TODAY.

An array of health and financial problems converge on African Americans as they age, posing a potentially devastating impact on them.

Blacks are more likely than whites to suffer medical conditions that lead to more severe health problems and higher health care and insurance costs as they grow older.

Their health problems are exacerbated by financial troubles that include lower savings,  homeownership rates and Social Security income than whites.

“It’s a huge issue,” says Maya Rockeymoore Cummings, CEO of Global Policy Solutions, a Washington, D.C., social-change strategy firm. “Over.... Read More

             

New Group Aims To Address Isolation Among LGBTQ Older Adults

by Lisa Gillespie. This story was originally broadcast on 89.3 WFPL.

New preliminary survey research from the University of Kentucky shows that many older LGBTQ adults feel isolated and aren’t tapped into senior services. And that research is shaping programming of a new group geared toward these adults out of Lexington and Louisville.

UK researcher Aaron Guest recently surveyed around 700 LGBTQ adults over age 50 in the state. He asked them about issues related to health care, long-term care and other issues that could impact the lifespan of these adults.

“There may not be many family units to provide care, or friendship networks may have shrunk, so there’s not individuals to step into the caregiver status,”.... Read More

             

Ocean Le: Giving back to the older adults who have impacted my life

Please kindly allow me to introduce myself as Ocean Le, an aspiring health professional with the goal to improve the lives of older adults and their families. My interest in the field is embedded in the rich foundation of knowledge that has not been fully understood by the public. As a first-generation student of two immigrant parents, I have seen the detrimental effects of limited access to health care both domestically and internationally. This has inspired me to improve access to both health care and health care information – empowering people involved in the process of care.

My interest began in Honolulu, Hawaii, as an intermediate student at a Roman Catholic School. As a section 8 housing kid, I was.... Read More

             

SAGE Alaska Has Made Its Mark on the LGBT Movement

by Aspen Christian. This article originally appeared in SAGEMatters, Fall 2018.

Over the past year, Alaska has emerged as a leader in the national fight against concerted, continuous attacks on the LGBT community, particularly those who are transgender.

In April, Anchorage became the first city in the nation to defeat an anti-transgender proposition that would have made it illegal for transgender people to use the locker room and bathroom that match their gender identity. SAGE Alaska was a part of the driving force behind the defeat of the proposition, and worked collectively with like-minded groups in the Fair.... Read More

             

Protecting Southeast Asian American Families

In a recent essay published in AAPI blog Reappropriate, Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) executive director Quyen Dinh recounted what is what like for her to grow up poor and not know it.

In elementary school, my day started with getting breakfast from the cafeteria window, where I got to choose a cereal box along with a small carton of milk from our cafeteria lady, Angie.  She had short curly silver hair and always happily provided us our breakfast, along with a great smile.

For lunch, I lined up with the rest of my classmates to get lunch from Angie, too. Each of us carried a small envelope with our names on it.

I didn’t realize,.... Read More

             

The Ways Inequality Affects Black Americans at the End of Life

by Rochaun Meadows-Fernandez. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Jodi Savage was her grandmother’s caretaker in her last days. Like many black Americans, her grandmother’s cultural beliefs and religious background led to very little discussion around the end of life. Culturally speaking, black Americans on the whole tend to avoid discussing end-of-life topics for fear of speaking things into existence. Focus is placed on making the best of the time you’re given. A lack of cultural competency from physicians led to a misunderstanding of Savage’s grandmother’s needs and minimal support through the death-planning process. Savage.... Read More

             

LGBT Seniors Grapple With End-of-Life Issues

by Matthew S. Bajko. This article originally appeared in the Bay Area Reporter.

While enjoying her 72nd year on the planet, Donna Personna knows her remaining days are numbered. Yet the prospect of her demise doesn’t scare her.

“The end question. ‘The end.’ It’s not a touchy subject for me. I’m irreverent,” said Personna, a transgender woman who grew up in San Jose and now lives in San Francisco. “I learned long ago this was going to come.”

Personna, a beloved drag performer, playwright, and hairdresser, credits her Mexican heritage with teaching her that death is a part of life. She pointed to the annual Dia de los Muertos holiday — the Day of the Dead in.... Read More

             
Page 1 of 1112345...10...Last »