The Legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. As an Activist for Health Reform

On January 15, 1929, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King’s family always knew that he was special, but no one knew how special he would turn out to be, with his influence still being felt today. As one of the most prominent leaders of the Civil Rights Movement, Dr. King united Americans to fight racism and oppression via civil disobedience and nonviolent protesting. What is less well known about Dr. King is that his vision for a better America included abolishing health injustice.

“Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health care is the most shocking and inhuman.” — Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

We seldom talk about Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s.... Read More

             

Long-Term Care Equality Index proceeds to next phase

by Lois A. Bowers. This article originally appeared on McKnight’s Senior Living.

It was mid-April when I first told you about the launch of a new nationwide tool by elder advocacy group SAGE and the Human Rights Campaign Foundation to assess how well independent living, assisted living, memory care and continuing care retirement communities, as well as skilled nursing and hospice facilities, are treating residents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer.

About eight months later, the voluntary Long-Term Care Equality Index, or LEI, now has 47 national, statewide, regional and local aging, senior services or LGBTQ membership or advocacy organizations that have endorsed the index and.... Read More

             

CAPAC Discusses Alarming Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations under Trump

WASHINGTON, DC – Last week, the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus (CAPAC) held a Congressional Forum on the Rise of Southeast Asian Deportations. Members of Congress in attendance included CAPAC Chair Judy Chu (D-CA-27), CAPAC Immigration Task Force Chair Pramila Jayapal, (D-WA-7) House Judiciary Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee Chair Zoe Lofgren (D-CA-19), and Reps. Ami Bera (D-CA-7), Gil Cisneros (D-CA-39), Lou Correa (D-CA-46), Alan Lowenthal (D-CA-47), Grace Meng (D-NY-6), Harley Rouda (D-CA-48), and Maxine Waters (D-CA-43).

Since 1998, more than 17,000 Southeast Asian refugees have been issued a final order of removal, but due to.... Read More

             

Mia Frances Yamamoto: Lawyer, Advocate, Hero

November is Transgender Awareness Month. I am so proud to share this video from Mia Frances Yamamoto, who transitioned at the age of 60 to be her true self.

I call her my radical warrior friend, not only because of who she is, but because of the work that she does both as an attorney and an advocate for so many marginalized communities. Can you imagine the courage it took to walk into court one day as male and the next day as female? Can you imagine telling all your clients that you are transitioning from male to female and if they are not comfortable you will recommend them to attorneys that you trust?

Not one.... Read More

             

Imani Woody: Building a Home for LGBTQ Older Adults

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Imani Woody’s father left her his home in Washington, D.C. — the one she grew up in ­— when he died in 2010. Faced with the decision of what to do with the house, Woody, a lifelong activist for women, people of color and the LGBGQ community, chose to renovate the house and turn it into the first of hopefully many locations of Mary’s House (named for her late mother). It’s an affordable independent living community for older adults targeting the cultural and relational needs of LGBTQ.... Read More

             

The importance of LGBT love, identity, and history in October and all year long

October is LGBTQ History Month, and here are two stories from the Asian Pacific Islander LGBTQ community that capture some of their history. Both of these individuals are over 60 years of age.

Bill Tashima lives in Seattle, Washington where he moved so he could live more freely as a gay man.

“I thought that if anybody ever found out [that I was gay], I would have to kill myself.”

To see Bill’s full story, click here.

 

Desiree Thompson is a lesbian who moved from Hawaii to San Francisco for love.

“Maybe I would have been okay as a married woman with children living the heteronormative life, but perhaps there would have been.... Read More

             

Celebrating National Disability Employment Awareness Month

In addition to being Hispanic Heritage Month, LGBT History Month, and Filipino American History Month, October is National Disability Employment Awareness Month (NDEAM). This month, we celebrate the contributions of workers with disabilities and educate everyone about the value of a workforce inclusive of their skills and talents. This year’s theme, “The Right Talent, Right Now,” emphasizes the critical role people with disabilities have in America’s economy.

In 2018, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that people with disabilities make up 19.1% of the employed population. It is clear that people with disabilities.... Read More

             

SAGE Stonewall Veterans Speak: Val Harris

This article is part of a series of profiles of the inspiring SAGE constituents who were part of the Stonewall uprising in 1969, an event that inspired the modern LGBT-rights movement. It was originally published on the SAGE blog.

Charles “Valentino” Harris, known to friends and family simply as Val, was 17 years old the first night of the Stonewall uprising. “On that night in ’69, I was at a disco called the Sanctuary near Times Square with my friend Nelson,” says the native New Yorker. “Someone called the bar, and suddenly word spread that the drag queens were rioting at the Stonewall.” He and.... Read More

             

Take action: Submit a comment to protect health care rights for all

This post originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.


Health is a human right, and that is why we believe that a patient’s health should come first. The Trump Administration has introduced a new proposed rule that would radically reinterpret civil rights protections under the Health Care Rights Law (Section 1557 of the Affordable Care Act) for people who are limited English proficient (LEP). This includes changing how US Department of Health and Human Services and federal and state health insurance marketplaces must comply with the law, limiting enforcement of civil rights, and rolling.... Read More

             
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