The Nation’s Largest LGBTQ-Inclusive Affordable Housing for Older Adults

This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When applications opened for New York City’s first affordable housing property for LGBTQ older adults recently, 1,000 people eagerly sent theirs in on that first day.

This underscores a genuine need. Not only is New York City increasingly unaffordable, but LGBTQ older adults run up against pervasive barriers when trying to find a place to live.

A 2014 report by the Equal Rights Center found that near half of LGBTQ couples applying for senior housing were subjected to discrimination, and a quarter of transgender older adults report housing.... Read More

             

A New Project Aims to Make Residential Care More LGBT-Friendly

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

Two months after my mother entered a nursing home at age 73, she made a firm request to the home’s administration: add a Spanish-language channel to the lineup being offered throughout the facility. They obliged, lightening an otherwise grueling life transition for my mother, and her room soon filled with the sounds of programs she had watched much of her adult life. While it was a relatively modest concession on behalf of the nursing home, this decision was profoundly important to my mother. In the context of long-term care, it embodied the “person-centered” philosophy that has become increasingly common in this sector, affirming that individuals across the spectrum.... Read More

             

Pride Month: Caregiving in LGBT Communities

It is estimated that 10,000 adults turn 65 and older everyday. Amidst an aging population and shrinking healthcare workforce, caregivers play a crucial role in the long-term care of older adults, accounting for more than 85% of all elder care in the US. According to a 2015 study by AARP, it was estimated that there are 34.2 million Americans are providing care to another person who is over the age 50.

The number of caregivers in the United States is expected to grow alongside the older adult population. Caregivers provide physical, psychological, and emotional care for another person who may be a family member, friend, or a partner. The act of providing care can be very fulfilling, but as a.... Read More

             

What Second Chance? The Uncertain Future of Post-Prison Health Care

by Cassie M. Chew. This article originally appeared in The Crime Report.

In the months since President Trump signed the First Step Act, the product of a landmark bipartisan effort that many have called one of the most important justice reforms in years, about 500 individuals have been released from federal prison.

“America is a nation that believes in redemption,” the president boasted at the White House signing ceremony, as he celebrated a law that expands the “good time credits” allowing more federal inmates to apply for early release.

But for many of those returning citizens, “redemption” may prove a mixed blessing.

White House Hurdles to Care

Thanks to White House policies that.... Read More

             

A Little Too Late: Some Chinese American Vets to Never Receive WWII Gold Medal

by Chunxiang Jin. To read the original article in Chinese, please visit the World Journal website.

Peter Woo would never get the chance to receive the Congressional Gold Medal for his indelible service during World War II.

He died unexpectedly only six days before President Trump signed the Chinese-American World War II Veteran Congressional Gold Medal Act into law on Dec. 20, 2018. Woo, along with many other Chinese American veterans of World War II, have passed away in the past few years. Now there are less than 100 veterans who might be able to receive this recognition for their service.

Flying Tiger Squadron

Woo was born in 1919 to a literary family in Taishan, Guangdong province. He came to the United States as a.... Read More

             

Despite connectivity, social isolation is not declining—especially among diverse older adults

This article originally appeared in Aging Today, the bimonthly newspaper of the American Society on Aging.

When asked by staff of the Diverse Elders Coalition about the aging services available in her area, Elva, an American Indian elder from New Mexico, relayed how important her local Elder Center was to her and her peers’ well-being: “We as elders need a place to come to, [where we] have meals, do activities and visit with friends and relatives.”

Elva noted that the Elder Center was a place where she could get information about benefits and other available resources. “Many times, as a Native elder, we feel that we don’t exist,” she said.

In our increasingly digitally connected world, there.... Read More

             

To Be Seen

My memories from childhood are extremely hazy. Most of what I can recall are fleeting feelings: the bliss in skipping around my Kindergarten classroom as I sang about the days of the week, the joy in jumping up and down on my parents’ bed as I watched “David the Gnome,” the curiosity in having accidentally swallowed a piece of gum, the preceding anxiety and subsequent relief in remembering my steps for a dance recital. Practically all my childhood firsts are long forgotten; I cannot recollect the first book I ever read by myself, or the first tooth I lost, or the.... Read More

             

Social Security Scammers Are Calling

by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is getting more reports about people pretending to be from the Social Security Administration (SSA) calling to get Social Security numbers and even money.

This is a scam that is growing exponentially each year. In 2017, 3,200 people reported SSA imposter scams, and lost nearly $210,000, according to the FTC. Government imposter scams made up nearly half of the 535,417 imposter scams reported to the FTC in 2018.

In one version of the scam,.... Read More

             

Factors that Worsen Cancer in Diverse Communities

Cancer remains one of the most dangerous diseases that affects millions of people. It is projected by 2020 that the leading cause of death in the United States will transition from heart disease to cancer. In some of our diverse communities, this transition has already happened. For both Asian American and Latinx communities, cancer is the leading cause of death. Similarly, African Americans are also significantly affected by cancer with 200 deaths per 100,000 African Americans. The effects of cancer in our diverse communities become even more alarming when examining individual cancers, such as breast cancer or prostate cancer. Breast.... Read More

             
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