War, Trauma, and the Mental Health of Vietnam War-Era Older Adults

After the fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, many Vietnamese people fled their war-torn country for the United States in search for a better life. Thousands of Vietnamese adults, children, and families crammed onto boats and traveled to the United States leaving their belongings, loved ones, and former lives behind. These people lost everything except for their memories of the fall of Saigon, the horrors of communist re-education camps, and the atrocities of the Vietnam War. For many Vietnamese individuals, these memories may transpire psychological trauma similar to the many Vietnam War-era U.S. veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

PTSD is a psychiatric disorder that can occur after a person experiences or observes.... Read More

             

Where to Find Help for Difficult Caregiving Tasks

by Chuck Otto. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Caring for a family member, friend or neighbor whose health is compromised by illness, injury or age can be among life’s greatest challenges. And the results of a new AARP study confirm that many non-professional caregivers are doing more medical and nursing tasks than ever.

Home Alone Revisited highlights the breadth and complexity of the tasks demanded of today’s family caregivers. A follow-up to AARP’s 2012 Home Alone study, the new study shows more caregivers are assuming responsibility for particularly demanding procedures once considered the exclusive domain of medical professionals, such as managing incontinence, pain and special diets.

Among the.... Read More

             

Vietnamese immigrants care for parents with dementia, amidst stigma

 

by Christine Nguyen, MD. This story originally aired on KALW Public Radio.

It was August 24, 2017, one day before Hurricane Harvey, a category 4 hurricane, hit Houston and dumped more water than any storm ever recorded in United States history. In just a few days, Houston saw as much rain as it usually saw in a year. My brother picked up our dad, who was 82, at his house, where he lived alone, and they evacuated to higher ground. They rode out the storm in the countryside. My brother’s in-laws had gotten 10 pounds of ground beef and made enough chili to last through the storm. This is.... Read More

             

Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month Highlight on Asian American Pacific Islanders

Alzheimer’s disease is a public health issue that impacts many. In the United States, 5.8 million people live with Alzheimer’s, while over 16 million family members and friends serve as their unpaid caregivers.

In light of June being Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) is taking the time to reflect on how Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia uniquely impacts the aging Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community. Working closely with older adults through our programs, we feel the importance of these issues more with each day. After all, one of the greatest known risk factors for Alzheimer’s is age.

AAPI older adults are.... Read More

             

How to Support a Transgender Child or Grandchild

This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Gender is much more complex than most of us were taught.

Transgender people have existed for as long as people have existed. But due to stigma, poor treatment, lack of knowing others like themselves and fear of rejection, many transgender people have chosen not to come out earlier in life — or at all.

Transgender people face patterns of mistreatment and discrimination at alarmingly high rates when looking at the most basic elements of life: finding a job, having a place to live, accessing medical care and enjoying the support of family and community, according to the National Center for Transgender Equality, which conducted.... Read More

             

Addressing the Social Determinants of Brain Health

by Jason Resendez and Stephanie Monroe. This article originally appeared on SaludAmerica!

In our work with the UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Alzheimer’s Disease Disparities Engagement Network, we are reflecting on the numerous challenges and injustices people of color face when it comes to healthcare in the U.S.

For example, African Americans and Latinos face a higher risk for some of our country’s most common health problems, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, stroke, Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

To understand and address these disparities, greater attention must be paid to the role of.... Read More

             

The Nation’s Largest LGBTQ-Inclusive Affordable Housing for Older Adults

This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When applications opened for New York City’s first affordable housing property for LGBTQ older adults recently, 1,000 people eagerly sent theirs in on that first day.

This underscores a genuine need. Not only is New York City increasingly unaffordable, but LGBTQ older adults run up against pervasive barriers when trying to find a place to live.

A 2014 report by the Equal Rights Center found that near half of LGBTQ couples applying for senior housing were subjected to discrimination, and a quarter of transgender older adults report housing.... Read More

             

A New Project Aims to Make Residential Care More LGBT-Friendly

This article originally appeared on the PHI blog.

Two months after my mother entered a nursing home at age 73, she made a firm request to the home’s administration: add a Spanish-language channel to the lineup being offered throughout the facility. They obliged, lightening an otherwise grueling life transition for my mother, and her room soon filled with the sounds of programs she had watched much of her adult life. While it was a relatively modest concession on behalf of the nursing home, this decision was profoundly important to my mother. In the context of long-term care, it embodied the “person-centered” philosophy that has become increasingly common in this sector, affirming that individuals across the spectrum.... Read More

             

How to Be an LGBTQ Ally

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Chances are, there’s at least one person in your life who identifies within the LGBTQ community — likely more than one. The person might be a family member. Or a neighbor. Or a friend’s child or grandchild.

Though messaging about, and support of, LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) people has progressed in recent years, the community still faces hate crimes, employment and housing discrimination, barriers to health care and harmful bias. That’s why allies are so important.

An “ally” is someone.... Read More

             
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