To Be Seen

My memories from childhood are extremely hazy. Most of what I can recall are fleeting feelings: the bliss in skipping around my Kindergarten classroom as I sang about the days of the week, the joy in jumping up and down on my parents’ bed as I watched “David the Gnome,” the curiosity in having accidentally swallowed a piece of gum, the preceding anxiety and subsequent relief in remembering my steps for a dance recital. Practically all my childhood firsts are long forgotten; I cannot recollect the first book I ever read by myself, or the first tooth I lost, or the.... Read More

             

For Aging Immigrants, Food from Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness

by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared on The Bold Italic.

“Do you have drumsticks?” my 85-year-old mother asks the cashier at the checkout counter at Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, California. The woman points to a pile of long, narrow, cylindrical vegetables near the counter. A half-hour later, a quick inventory of my mother’s cart reveals drumsticks, taro roots, squash, long beans, okra, winter melons, pointed gourd, snake gourd, spices, snack packets of murukkus and a bag of brown basmati rice.

Food bought, cooked, served and eaten is collectively the barometer of my mother’s moods, which are intricately entangled with her health. When she’s bustling around the kitchen, cooking sambar, kootuor olan with squash and winter melon,.... Read More

             

Culturally Competent Care Resources for Providers Serving Dual Eligibles

Dear Colleague,

April was National Minority Health Month, and May is Older Americans Month. In observance, we invite you to explore our resources for delivering culturally and linguistically competent long-term services and supports (LTSS).

Long-term services and supports (LTSS) are a vital part of care for many dually eligible beneficiaries. Nearly half (42 percent) of full-benefit dual eligibles used LTSS in 2013, including nursing facility services, adult day programs, home care, and personal care services. Individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups often experience disparities in access, quality, and outcomes.... Read More

             

Elder Refugees In Kentucky At Risk for Hunger

by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part one of a three part series; you can read part one here and read part two here.

Feeding Kentucky, a nonprofit with a mission to alleviate hunger across the Bluegrass State, reports that food insecurity is a reality for one in 10 residents age 60 and older.

Elder refugees

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

in Kentucky face an ever higher risk of hunger due to language barriers and lack of transportation.

On a recent rainy afternoon in Louisville,.... Read More

             

HRC and SAGE Announce Partnership on First-Ever Assessment of Care Facilities Serving Older LGBTQ People

This press release originally appeared on the SAGE website.

Yesterday, the Human Rights Campaign (HRC) Foundation, the educational arm of the nation’s largest lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer (LGBTQ) civil rights organization, and SAGE, the world’s largest and oldest organization dedicated to improving the lives of LGBTQ older adults, announced a historic partnership to fundamentally improve the experiences of LGBTQ older adults as they seek long-term care and services.

A centerpiece of the effort will be the Long-Term Care Equality Index (LEI), the first-ever nationwide assessment of how long-term care facilities are treating.... Read More

             

NICOA Joins 2019 Aging in America Conference

by Kayla Sawyer

The National Indian Council on Aging, Inc. (NICOA) will travel to New Orleans for the 2019 Aging in America conference on April 15-18 to learn best practices and gain insights from leaders in the field about the current state of aging in America. Join nearly 3,000 professionals to discuss a multitude of issues affecting older adults as well as the latest policies and trends.

According to the American Society on Aging, the conference will have “a strong focus on critical and emergent topics facing the field of aging, as well as cutting-edge and responsive programmatic, research, policy and advocacy efforts.” Topics will include social isolation, emergency and disaster readiness, housing.... Read More

             

Louisville Program for Elder Refugees Is A Buffer Against Isolation

by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part two of a three part story; read part one here and read part three here.

When elder refugees arrive in America they leave behind violence or religious persecution, as well as family, culture and their native language. A program in Louisville, Kentucky helps refugees who are 60 and older transition to American life and avoid isolation.

This is a protection against isolation – a social hall alive with music that inspires clapping and dancing among refugees in their 60s, 70s, 80s and early 90s. It’s part of the Louisville Refugee Elder Program that serves arrivals.... Read More

             

Factors that Worsen Cancer in Diverse Communities

Cancer remains one of the most dangerous diseases that affects millions of people. It is projected by 2020 that the leading cause of death in the United States will transition from heart disease to cancer. In some of our diverse communities, this transition has already happened. For both Asian American and Latinx communities, cancer is the leading cause of death. Similarly, African Americans are also significantly affected by cancer with 200 deaths per 100,000 African Americans. The effects of cancer in our diverse communities become even more alarming when examining individual cancers, such as breast cancer or prostate cancer. Breast.... Read More

             

Elder Refugees in the Bluegrass State Face Challenge of Language Barriers

by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part one of a three part series; read part two here and read part three here.

One of the biggest barriers refugees face when they arrive in America is learning English.  A program in Louisville, Kentucky helps refugees who are 60 and older cross the language barrier.

“How long has she been in the United States?”

(Conversation in Kinyarwanda language) “One year and five months.”

“So she came here when she was 88 years old?”

“She was 89.”

Interpreter Patrick Bagaza speaks with 90-year-old Therese Nyamubyeyi during a trip with the Louisville Refugee Elder Program to.... Read More
             
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