Needed: More Community Support for People With Dementia

By Sandy Markwood, CEO of the National Association of Area Agencies on Aging. This post originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Our country has reached a critical moment. The aging of the baby boom generation and the fact that people are living longer is driving tremendous growth in the numbers of older adults. By 2030, one in five Americans will be age 65 or older. And statistics show that 90 percent of this population will want to age at home and in their communities.

To achieve this goal, older adults will likely need access to local services and supports — and their caregivers will need assistance, too. Providing those services is what members of the National Association.... Read More

             

Health Risks To Farmworkers Increase As Workforce Ages

by Sarah Varney, Kaiser Health News.

That bag of frozen cauliflower sitting inside your freezer likely sprang to life in a vast field north of Salinas, Calif. A crew of men and women here use a machine to drop seedlings into the black soil. Another group follows behind, stooped over, tapping each new plant.

It is backbreaking, repetitive work. Ten-hour days start in the cold, dark mornings and end in the searing afternoon heat.

More than 90 percent of California’s crop workers were born in Mexico. But in recent years, fewer have migrated to the U.S., according to the U.S. Department of Labor. Researchers point to a number of causes: tighter border controls; higher prices charged by.... Read More

             

Texans With HIV Cope With Homes And Medicines Ruined By Hurricane Harvey

This story by Kaiser Health News senior national correspondent Sarah Varney aired Nov. 24, 2017, on Here & Now.

Angelia Soloman watched out the window of her ranch house in northeastern Houston as the floodwaters rose up to the windowsills.

She huddled inside with her three adopted children (ages 12 to 15), a nephew and her 68-year-old mother. “They were looking and crying, like, ‘We’re gonna lose everything,’” said Soloman. “And I’m like, ‘No, it’ll be OK.’”

When the water began rushing under the front door, filling up the house like a bathtub, Soloman led her family outside, and plunged into a river of water up to her chest.

The hurricane couldn’t have come at a worse time.... Read More

             

Kintsugi: A Survivor’s Reflection on World AIDS Day 2017

by Hank Trout. A long-term survivor of HIV/AIDS, Hank is a thirty-seven-year resident of San Francisco, where he lives with his fiancé Rick. Follow him on Twitter @HankTroutWriter. This article originally appeared in A&U Magazine.

When the Japanese mend broken objects, they emphasize the damage by filling in the cracks with gold.

They believe that when something has suffered damage and has history, it becomes more beautiful than before.

This is kintsugi, the art of “fixing with gold.”

We were broken.
Thirty-six years ago, a virus invaded our community, invaded our bodies. It destroyed hundreds of thousands.... Read More

             

NAPCA Receives the 2017 Community Organization Recognition Award for Positively Impacting the Health and Quality of Life of AAPI Communities

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 10, 2017
CONTACT: Wes Lum, (206) 624-1221

The Asian and Pacific Islander Caucus for Public Health of the American Public Health Association has awarded the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) the 2017 Community Organization Recognition Award for being dynamic and visionary in creating and leading the nation’s public health practice locally, nationally, and globally by promoting health and quality of life in Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities.

NAPCA has been collaborating with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center on several projects including:

Colorectal cancer screening study among Korean immigrants, A cultural adaptation of the Check Change Control program (an evidence-based blood pressure monitoring program from the.... Read More
             

Taking aging and caregiving as they come: an interview with Betty Thomson

A torso shot of a dark-skinned, Vietnamese person with shaved black hair and black glasses smile. liz wears a ruffled, dusty pink dress with a heather gray, long-sleeved sweater.Elizabeth (liz) Anh Thomson (they/them/theirs) identifies as a bi/queer, Vietnamese adoptee, disabled, gender non-conforming, cisgender female. They were adopted from Vietnam in 1974 by two sisters, Alva (ma) and Betty Thomson (mom). They were raised in Indianapolis, IN in a predominantly white, middle class neighborhood. They studied German and Sociology in undergraduate; Master’s in Women and Gender Studies; and currently a fourth year PhD candidate in Disability Studies, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. They have a passion for documentary photography, community organizing,.... Read More

             

To achieve the wellbeing and aging with dignity for seniors it is necessary to guarantee the emotional and physical health of their Caregivers

By Nicolás Peña. This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog

Si quieres leer este artículo en español, haz clic aquí.

More than 9 million Latinos in the United States are caring for a family member without receiving any kind of compensation. This represents a challenge when they need to balance the many responsibilities of their lives in conjunction with caring for their loved ones. Their average income is $39,000 per year, well below the national average of $54,700.

In response, on October 20, 2017, the National Hispanic Council on.... Read More

             

The Incredible Disappearing Affordable Care Act

Well, September has officially passed. The Republican attempt to repeal the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has officially sunsetted. Hallelujah.

…right?

My fleeting sigh of relief was almost immediately replaced with concern over the death-by-a-million-paper-cuts approach to ending affordable healthcare access, the latest being #45’s decision to eliminate health-care subsidies — not to mention continued Republican rhetoric to try again in, oh, I don’t know, maybe January or February.

My mother-in-law is in her last — who knows how long she has. And her remaining days, which could and should be carefree, are instead filled with anxiety about how her middle-aged daughter will afford health care. Not whether her daughter can afford pretty golden baubles. Not.... Read More

             

Alzheimer’s Association and the National Hispanic Council on Aging collaborate to educate Latino communities, increase access to Alzheimer’s information and resources

This press release was issued by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) on September 16, 2017.

The Alzheimer’s Association and the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) announced today a nationwide partnership aimed at increasing Alzheimer’s disease awareness and education in Latino communities across the country.

The partnership will develop a network of health promoters to deliver Alzheimer’s education in Latino communities, while connecting people living with the disease and their caregivers to free resources and support services offered through the Alzheimer’s Association. The health promoters will help bridge cultural and linguistic barriers.... Read More

             

Are you managing multiple chronic health conditions? Medicare can help!

Managing your health can be challenging, especially if you have two or more chronic conditions or illnesses. The Connected Care campaign offers information to help you take advantage of new Medicare services that pay for comprehensive care management particularly needed by patients dealing with multiple chronic conditions. If you have Medicare and live with two or more chronic conditions, you may be eligible for chronic care management (CCM) services to help you maximize your health and spend more time with your loved ones.

What does CCM mean for you?

CCM means having a continuous relationship with a.... Read More
             
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