As An HIV Survivor, COVID-19 Stigma Is Sadly Familiar

by John-Manuel Andriote. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Elizabeth Martucci figured it made perfect sense to share the exciting news that she and her 11-year-old son had recovered from COVID-19. The New Jersey resident even had “COVID-19 Survivor” T-shirts made.

Martucci didn’t anticipate the response she’d get to being a survivor — and the sometimes jarring lengths to which some will go because of their fear. As The New York Times reported in a story about Martucci, “Even now, a month into their recovery, some neighbors see them and run.”

“Federal.... Read More

             

Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom 25%.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based on age,.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             

COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one year.... Read More

             

Lifeline Has Additional Support For Tribal Lands

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Lifeline consumers can receive up to $25 per month discount (and up to $100 reduction for first-time connection charges) in addition to the standard Lifeline benefit amount if they live on federally recognized tribal lands.

Lifeline customers residing on tribal lands are eligible for Link Up. Link Up is a one-time benefit per address; you can request Link Up each time you change your primary residential address. Link Up can reimburse the full cost of initiating service with certain phone/internet companies at your primary.... Read More

             

Luis has HIV and is protecting himself against the novel coronavirus, COVID-19

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. Para leer este artículo en español, haga clic aquí.

COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a newly discovered coronavirus. That is believed to spread primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose when an infected person coughs or sneezes.

It is also possible for a person to become infected by COVID-19 by touching surfaces or objects that have the virus on them and then touch their own mouth, nose or eyes.

Most people infected with the COVID-19 virus will experience mild to moderate respiratory.... Read More

             

Undocumented Latino Seniors Struggle Without Pensions, Health Insurance

by Agustin Durán. To read the original Spanish-language article in La Opinión, click here. (Para leer este artículo en español, haga clic aquí.)

Estela García is not intimidated. She walks a lot, eats as healthfully as possible and stays positive. In general, this is the recipe that has allowed her, at the age of 84, to stay healthy. As an undocumented immigrant, living in the midst of one of the world’s most frightening pandemics, self-care and a positive outlook are what keeps her going.

“I just don’t panic,” she emphasized, but I don’t watch television either.” : “The news exaggerates so much that people believe everything and do not reflect on the veracity of what they hear.... Read More

             

Stay Connected While Social Distancing

by Roslyn Daniels. This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

People all over the world, including Americans, are practicing social distancing during this coronavirus pandemic. We’re sheltering at home, leaving only when necessary to replenish essential supplies or to get in a little exercise. 

Yes, it feels strange, this interruption to our lives and regular routines, but everyone who can stay home should; it saves lives and helps halt the spread of the virus. 

We’re not, however, blind to a byproduct of all this enforced separation: loneliness. A survey of.... Read More

             

Self-Care During the Covid-19 Outbreak

By Michelle Fritsch, PharmD, BCGP, BCACP, and Kathleen Cameron, BS Pharm, MPH. This article originally appeared on the National Council on Aging (NCOA) blog.

As we’re all navigating a lot of uncertainty, upsetting news, isolation, and grief, all of the self-care activities that were important for staying healthy before the pandemic may be even more critical now. Even though there is a lot of emphasis on COVID-19 right now, your overall health is just as important as any other time. The better controlled your chronic conditions, the better you’ll be able to fight the virus if.... Read More

             
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