Dances With Manangs

By Mariel Toni Jimenez. This article originally appeared in Positively Filipino magazine.

My mother looked forward to Sunday because it was a day that she and her friends went to the dance hall in Daly City, located in the park off Acton Street at the Top of the Hill.

If you look back at archived books and film clips on the arrival of Filipinos in America, you will find that the means of socializing were the dances; playing pool in the pool halls; and celebrating birthdays, weddings, and job promotions with a vast amount of Filipino food: lechon; adobo; lumpia; kare-kare; pinakbet; dinuguan; and, of course, pancit.

Today, one can still see the same patterns of.... Read More

             

As Death Approaches, Older Indian Americans Unprepared for the End

by Viji Sundaram. This article originally appeared on India West.

See the full slide show by Viji Sundaram at https://tinyurl.com/y5kc8fpk

The 88-year-old man looked gray and emaciated, the outline of his collarbones clearly visible under the loose fitting gown he wore as he lay in a narrow hospital bed in an East Bay nursing home. His eyes were closed, his mouth agape. A tube delivered both medicine and food directly into his stomach. He didn’t appear to know what was going on around him.

Nearly two years ago, aspiration pneumonia put Chandra Bhatia (his wife asked that his real name not be used) in the hospital. Since then, other health crises have.... Read More

             

Live a Healthier Life in Your 60s and Beyond

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

When you reach your 60s, all the issues that arose in your 50s become more extreme.

Your yearly well-woman visit is a good time to check in with your doctor about how you’re doing, how you’d like to be doing and what changes you can make to reach your health goals. In addition to talking with your doctor or nurse about your health, you may also need certain vaccines and medical tests. Don’t worry. You won’t need every test every year.

Younger than 65? Right now a yearly well-woman visit won’t cost.... Read More

             

Dual Stigma: HIV Positive and Over 50

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

HIV/AIDS used to be considered a disease of the young. In the early 1980s, when doctors first reported cases of HIV, nearly 70% of diagnoses were among people under 40.

Fast forward four decades later and more than 50% of Americans with HIV are now over 50. And by 2020 that number is expected to reach 65% to 70%. This is largely due to major medical improvements in the effectiveness of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) in suppressing the virus and transforming HIV from an often fatal.... Read More

             

Detroit’s Water Austerity: Lack of Household Water, Contamination, Potential Public Health Crisis

by Julia Kassem. This article originally appeared on Global Research News.

In 2017, the City of Detroit alone faced 171 cases of hepatitis A. This was more than all the rest of Wayne County with 142 cases, and topped any other county in Michigan. In total, over 500 cases were reported statewide in 2017, including 25 deaths.

Contamination worsens

After Detroit’s major flood spells, namely the devastating flood of August 11, 2014, which caused at least $1 billion in damage, residents waited years for compensation from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), if they received it at all. When FEMA assistance was received, it often barely amounted to a third of total damages. Floods in subsequent.... Read More

             

War, Trauma, and the Mental Health of Vietnam War-Era Older Adults

After the fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War in 1975, many Vietnamese people fled their war-torn country for the United States in search for a better life. Thousands of Vietnamese adults, children, and families crammed onto boats and traveled to the United States leaving their belongings, loved ones, and former lives behind. These people lost everything except for their memories of the fall of Saigon, the horrors of communist re-education camps, and the atrocities of the Vietnam War. For many Vietnamese individuals, these memories may transpire psychological trauma similar to the many Vietnam War-era U.S. veterans who suffer from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

PTSD is a psychiatric disorder that can occur after a person experiences or observes.... Read More

             

Where to Find Help for Difficult Caregiving Tasks

by Chuck Otto. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

Caring for a family member, friend or neighbor whose health is compromised by illness, injury or age can be among life’s greatest challenges. And the results of a new AARP study confirm that many non-professional caregivers are doing more medical and nursing tasks than ever.

Home Alone Revisited highlights the breadth and complexity of the tasks demanded of today’s family caregivers. A follow-up to AARP’s 2012 Home Alone study, the new study shows more caregivers are assuming responsibility for particularly demanding procedures once considered the exclusive domain of medical professionals, such as managing incontinence, pain and special diets.

Among the.... Read More

             

Vietnamese immigrants care for parents with dementia, amidst stigma

 

by Christine Nguyen, MD. This story originally aired on KALW Public Radio.

It was August 24, 2017, one day before Hurricane Harvey, a category 4 hurricane, hit Houston and dumped more water than any storm ever recorded in United States history. In just a few days, Houston saw as much rain as it usually saw in a year. My brother picked up our dad, who was 82, at his house, where he lived alone, and they evacuated to higher ground. They rode out the storm in the countryside. My brother’s in-laws had gotten 10 pounds of ground beef and made enough chili to last through the storm. This is.... Read More

             

Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month Highlight on Asian American Pacific Islanders

Alzheimer’s disease is a public health issue that impacts many. In the United States, 5.8 million people live with Alzheimer’s, while over 16 million family members and friends serve as their unpaid caregivers.

In light of June being Alzheimer’s & Brain Awareness Month, the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) is taking the time to reflect on how Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia uniquely impacts the aging Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community. Working closely with older adults through our programs, we feel the importance of these issues more with each day. After all, one of the greatest known risk factors for Alzheimer’s is age.

AAPI older adults are.... Read More

             

Addressing the Social Determinants of Brain Health

by Jason Resendez and Stephanie Monroe. This article originally appeared on SaludAmerica!

In our work with the UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Alzheimer’s Disease Disparities Engagement Network, we are reflecting on the numerous challenges and injustices people of color face when it comes to healthcare in the U.S.

For example, African Americans and Latinos face a higher risk for some of our country’s most common health problems, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, stroke, Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

To understand and address these disparities, greater attention must be paid to the role of.... Read More

             
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