Kintsugi: A Survivor’s Reflection on World AIDS Day 2017

This article originally appeared in A&U Magazine.

When the Japanese mend broken objects, they emphasize the damage by filling in the cracks with gold.

They believe that when something has suffered damage and has history, it becomes more beautiful than before.

This is kintsugi, the art of “fixing with gold.”

We were broken.
Thirty-six years ago, a virus invaded our community, invaded our bodies. It destroyed hundreds of thousands of us. Those of us whom the virus couldn’t kill, it left broken—physically, emotionally, financially, spiritually broken.

We have suffered damage.
Those of us who carry the virus inside.... Read More

             

Native American Heritage Month – Digital Storytelling

National Native American Heritage Month pays tribute to the rich traditions of Native Americans, and one of those traditions is storytelling. For the past month, the National Indian Council On Aging (NICOA) has been sharing the most recent stories from the Native Elder Storytelling Project to help celebrate that tradition.

Click above to watch our latest videos. They can also be found on NICOA’s YouTube channel along with our first round of videos.

Native Storytelling Importance

Shannon Smith from the Native Daughters Project beautifully paints the picture of the importance of Native storytelling:

Storytelling is a diverse and powerful medium of imagery and.... Read More

             

Results of the National Hispanic Council on Aging’s 2017 National Caregiving Survey

Family has always been at the heart of Hispanic values. A big part of that value includes caring for our elders. In fact, providing care for our elders is often considered an honor and is performed willingly. However, caregiving does not come without its own challenges.

As life expectancies grow, we are faced with concerns about health (e.g., chronic disease, dementia, etc.), health care costs, financial stability, and housing. Many of these issues have Hispanic families turning to each other even more for physical, emotional and financial support.

This year, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), along with its partners, has focused on the needs of Hispanic family caregivers. Over the course of the past year, among other things,.... Read More

             

NAPCA Receives the 2017 Community Organization Recognition Award for Positively Impacting the Health and Quality of Life of AAPI Communities

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: November 10, 2017
CONTACT: Wes Lum, (206) 624-1221

The Asian and Pacific Islander Caucus for Public Health of the American Public Health Association has awarded the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) the 2017 Community Organization Recognition Award for being dynamic and visionary in creating and leading the nation’s public health practice locally, nationally, and globally by promoting health and quality of life in Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) communities.

NAPCA has been collaborating with Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center on several projects including:

Colorectal cancer screening study among Korean immigrants, A cultural adaptation of the Check Change Control program (an evidence-based blood pressure monitoring program from the.... Read More
             

Taking aging and caregiving as they come: an interview with Betty Thomson

A torso shot of a dark-skinned, Vietnamese person with shaved black hair and black glasses smile. liz wears a ruffled, dusty pink dress with a heather gray, long-sleeved sweater.Elizabeth (liz) Anh Thomson (they/them/theirs) identifies as a bi/queer, Vietnamese adoptee, disabled, gender non-conforming, cisgender female. They were adopted from Vietnam in 1974 by two sisters, Alva (ma) and Betty Thomson (mom). They were raised in Indianapolis, IN in a predominantly white, middle class neighborhood. They studied German and Sociology in undergraduate; Master’s in Women and Gender Studies; and currently a fourth year PhD candidate in Disability Studies, at the University of Illinois at Chicago. They have a passion for documentary photography, community organizing,.... Read More

             

Mapping LGBTQ History in St. Louis

All too often, history is written by those in the mainstream, and the stories of marginalized communities – the stories of our elders – are lost. A team in St. Louis is working to recapture and map the history of LGBTQ communities in the region, and last month, they unveiled their interactive online map that documents queer history across the city from 1945 to 1992. Researchers identified 800 locations that were important to the LGBTQ communities in St. Louis during that time, including bars, bookstores, HIV clinics, cruising spots, protest sites, and locations of police.... Read More

             

This Holiday Season, Help LGBT Older Adults Connect with Community

Today, the Movement Advancement Project (MAP), SAGE, and the Diverse Elders Coalition released a new infographic in time for the holidays with resource links and information for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older adults seeking support, as well as information about the challenges facing LGBT older adults.

Click here to print, download and share the new infographic!

For many older adults, the holidays can be a difficult time. However, this season can be particularly difficult for LGBT older adults. The lack of social and legal acceptance, both historically and currently,.... Read More

             

Aging Undocumented Day Laborers Face Uncertain Future

By Jacqueline García. Click here to read this article in Spanish.

Every morning, Eduardo arrives at a day laborer center in Los Angeles to pick up his crew for the day. Depending on the working schedule, the 52-year-old man takes between two and four men to work in different projects, mainly in construction.

“Sometimes other [day labor workers] laugh at me because I often take the older men,” said Eduardo. “But I take them because they have less opportunity to be hired,” said Eduardo. For many years he also worked as a jornalero, a day laborer doing different types of work, such as gardening, construction, loading, plumbing and other physical work.

One of his most loyal workers is Gerardo,.... Read More

             

Da Kine Pidgin Is Sweet Upon The Tongue

by Carolyn Ayon Lee. This article was originally published by Honolulu Civil Beat.

Were it not for Hawaii’s Pidgin English, I doubt my Grandma and I, her first grandchild, could’ve understood each other, she knowing very little English, and I, an ignoramus about her mother language, Korean.

Love can help build bridges, but for a meeting of the hearts and minds, one needs a basic common vocabulary.

Pidgin comes into play when I communicate with my father, David, whose native language is Korean. Actually, Dad is fluent in Japanese and can handle Mandarin Chinese, too. Nope, none of these Asian languages is familiar to me. I know far more Spanish and German, even Latin,.... Read More

             

How to Fix Racial Inequities in the Workplace

by Richard Eisenberg. This post originally appeared on Next Avenue.

As Next Avenue has noted, there are huge wealth and income disparities between blacks and whites in America (average wealth of white families was more than $500,000 higher than African Americans in 2013 and whites in 2015 earned $25.22 an hour, on average, compared with $18.49 for blacks). But what accounts for the huge labor market disparities between blacks and whites, such as an unemployment rate that’s been roughly twice as high for blacks than whites since the 1970s? And what can be done to lessen these disparities?

In its Race,.... Read More

             
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