Elderly Homeowners are the New Expendables as New Development Invades Nashville

by Peter White

EDITOR’S NOTE: The communities and organizations comprising the Diverse Elders Coalition are well aware of how the affordable housing crisis is hitting older Americans. Only last year, for instance, a UCLA study showed that three-quarters of California’s lower-income seniors who rend are being burdened by rising rental rates. The crisis, though, isn’t only being felt on the coasts. The following article is part of an investigative series for the Tennessee Tribune that unearthed trouble in Nashville. Veteran reporter Peter White produced this series on gentrification in “Music City” with support from the Journalists in Aging Fellows Program of the Gerontological Society of America, the Journalists Network on Generations and The.... Read More

             

Are you caring for an older adult? Take our new survey and let your voice be heard!

If you’re caring for an aging parent, spouse, partner, grandparent, relative, friend, or neighbor, we want to hear from you!

The Diverse Elders Coalition is currently surveying caregivers from our communities to learn more about the diverse experiences of family caregivers for older adults. We want to hear about your experiences so that we can create tools to better support caregivers like you.

The survey is currently available in English, Spanish, and Vietnamese. We will soon have additional languages available, including Chinese, Khmer, Korean, Hmong, and Lao.

Visit www.diverseelders.org/survey to get started. The.... Read More

             

Let’s Talk Aging, Caregiving and Cultural Competence at This Year’s Aging in America Conference

It’s April, which means that the American Society on Aging’s 2019 Aging in America Conference (AiA19) is right around the corner! The Diverse Elders Coalition and our five member organizations will be on the ground in New Orleans from April 15th through the 18th, talking about issues of aging, caregiving, and cultural competence in our communities. Will we see you there?

For conference attendees, you can find a full list of the panels, workshops, film screenings, and events that the Diverse Elders Coalition and its members will be a part of at AiA19 by clicking on.... Read More

             

Cultural competence: a challenge facing health care providers

Hispanics are one of the country’s largest ethnic groups and one of the fastest growing demographics, making up 17 percent of the U.S. population. As a group with higher rates of chronic disease, they face barriers navigating the health care system. These barriers include language and cultural differences, lack of education, health literacy, and a dearth of information.

Dr. Yanira Cruz, President/CEO of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), stresses that cultural factors may reduce equality in health care assistance for the Hispanic community and the opportunity to receive appropriate information from health care providers, in.... Read More

             

Doctor, Doctor: Changing Caregivers is Like Getting a Divorce

This article originally appeared in A&U Magazine.

What do you mean, you’re retiring at the end of the year?! You can’t do that! We’ve been together for twenty years! You can’t just walk out on me like that!

When you’re a long-term HIV/AIDS survivor and have been relying on the same healthcare provider for quite some time, changing doctors can be problematic, both physically and emotionally. It’s like losing a boxing coach.

I have been with the same large HMO here in San Francisco since 1992. Doctor “C” has been my primary caregiver for most of that time. I.... Read More

             

What Matters? Don’t Let Health Care Get in the Way

by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

When it comes to health care, what matters varies from person to person and differs depending on your state of health or illness. For one person, it might mean feeling well enough to care for an active young grandchild three days a week. For another person nearing the end of life, it might mean alleviating pain or being lucid enough to have one more conversation.

However, when we near death or become seriously ill.... Read More

             

Deportees with Few-to-No Options in Mexico

by Jacqueline García. This article was originally published on La Opinión. To read the original article in Spanish, click here. ||  por Jacqueline García. Este artículo fue publicado originalmente en La Opinión. Para leer el artículo original en español, haga clic aquí.

Manuel Ramirez tried to endure the pain and discomfort while he was cleaning an open wound on his left knee on a Sunday afternoon in December. He said about two months prior he had surgery but hasn’t healed.

Quite the opposite, his knee was swollen and seemed to need medical care. However, Ramirez, 52, couldn’t ask for immediate care because he lives in a tent in a park in Tijuana,.... Read More

             

Vietnamese Death Anniversaries Unite Young and Old

By Christine Nguyen, MD. This story originally appeared on KALW FM’s “Crosscurrents.

In 2006, my Mom had a dream. Grandma sat above her, perched on a black stone wall so high her feet didn’t touch the floor. “Mother,” Mom called, “You’re up so high. You might fall to your death.”

A phone call interrupted Mom’s dream. It was her brother. Their mother was dead. “Sister,” he added, “I’ve made Mother a tombstone. Black. Granite from India.”

Ancestor worship is the most common religious practice in Vietnam. It’s called Đạo Ông Bà, or “belief in Grandfather and Grandmother.” When a Vietnamese parent dies, the children make an altar in their homes for the parent’s spirit to live. The practice is.... Read More

             

The Importance of National Native HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a virus that attacks the body’s immune system, making it difficult to fight off diseases, infections and certain cancers. HIV specifically attacks the body’s CD4+ cells, a type of T-cell that has a critical role in our adaptive immune system. When an unknown virus, bacteria, or pathogen enters the human body, CD4+ cells are required to stimulate the immune system in making the machinery to fight off the unknown intruder. Without CD4+ cells, it becomes difficult for the human body to regulate immune responses, increasing the risk of death from diseases and infections as common as the cold. When HIV destroys CD4+ cells, impairing the functionality of the immune system, this leads to the acquired.... Read More

             
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