COVID-19 Impact: Ocean’s Story

This blog post was originally featured on SEARAC’s blog.

Ocean Le, program coordinator at Diverse Elders Coalition and a SEARAC LAT alumnus, says he’s been his parents’ translator for as long as he can remember.

“I can tell you their Social Security numbers right now because I’ve been supporting them my whole life,” shares Ocean, the eldest of three children to a Nigerian Vietnamese immigrant mother and Vietnamese French immigrant father.

With his dad being a self-employed taxi driver who cannot speak English very well, Ocean has done his taxes since childhood. When he.... Read More

             

How to care for someone with COVID-19 at home

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues and cases increase, many people are continuing their coronavirus treatment and recovery at home. Whether the person has symptoms or has been diagnosed with COVID-19, certain measures need to be taken to protect the health and wellbeing of patients and those living in the households with COVID-19 positive patients.

Below are recommendations for actions you can take at home:

Caregiving at home:

Caregivers and people who are infected with COVID-19 should wear masks when they are in the same.... Read More
             

Full Circle

By Mandy Diec. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

In 1991, my family and I arrived in California as part of the final wave of refugees resettling in the United States after the Vietnam War. My dad has retold this story many times. I loved these stories as a child because the focus was always on the lighter, amusing parts of the story, like when my parents tossed away a diaper they were given on the plane because they had no idea what it was, rather than the heavier reality of leaving the traumas of war and persecution* and beginning the fear and anxiety of acculturating and assimilating in this new, adopted country.

We.... Read More

             

A Pandemic Is Not the Time to Sever the Ties That Bind Generations

by Donna Butts. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

(Across caregiving and community, business and intergenerational attitudes, the pandemic and how we respond to it could change us forever. Next Avenue turned to some of our Influencers in Aging, a diverse group of thought leaders, for their insights, counsel and opinions of what could lie ahead — if we choose. This article, by a 2015 Next Avenue Influencer in Aging, originally appeared on Medium.com.)

It’s too early to know if social isolation or the coronavirus (COVID-19).... Read More

             

Planning for the Future of Hispanic Elders

By Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell for Telemundo Oklahoma (May 22, 2020). See this video news report in Spanish with English subtitles.

Taking care of loved ones can be very draining. Looking out for the ones you love should be a natural process, but in Hispanic culture it is basically mandatory. Plans need to be set with loved ones for when they can no longer look out for themselves. One of the most difficult decisions a person can make is to leave everything they have built behind to take care of relatives who can no longer take care of themselves.

.... Read More
             

Virtual Classes for Older Adults: Here to Stay

by Susan Stiles, PhD. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

“I look forward to the calls each week.”

This comment was typical of the feedback that Peggy Schmidt received when she offered a virtual Aging Mastery “book club” to her rural constituents in Wisconsin. As the Caregiver/Health Promotion Specialist for the Aging & Disability Resource Center there, she transformed in-person classes to virtual ones, but after a survey revealed a deep digital divide in her community, she conducted classes via telephone. These weekly sessions provided one means for her and.... Read More

             

SCOTUS Decision Sparks Community to Continue the Fight

By Randi Robertson. This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

Overjoyed doesn’t really cover it! On June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States of America affirmed that I, a retired USAF Officer/Pilot who voluntarily served 22 years to protect and defend the constitution, who happens to be transgender, is actually protected from work place discrimination under Title VII of the civil rights act.

The past several years have been like walking through a dark tunnel as the current White House and Administration has systematically tried to erase transgender people like myself. The most recent actions to erase protections for LGBTQI people in the arena of healthcare treatment, by changing Affordable Care Act.... Read More

             

Maximize Your Virtual Health Care Visit

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Social distancing recommendations have forced us to change the way health care is being delivered. Virtual health care visits allow providers to see patients when coming into the clinic isn’t an option. They help us minimize disease spread, eliminate unnecessary hospital visits and free up resources so people in critical need can be better served.

Virtual health care isn’t new. Telemedicine appointments have been used for years by physicians for post-operative and follow-up appointments, but many of us haven’t taken part in video-based visits. So it stands to reason that some of us might be nervous the first time we have a telehealth visit, especially.... Read More

             

Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

This article originally appeared on Medium.

Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based.... Read More

             

With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

“I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

             
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