Diversifying Research on COVID-19 and Aging-Related Issues: A Call for Asian American and Pacific Islander Older Adults and Caregivers to Participate in COMPASS and CARE

By Frances Huynh and Dyanna Chung. This article originally appeared in NAPCA’s media center.

2020 was an incredibly challenging year for most people because of the coronavirus pandemic outbreak. One significant thing that we have learned is that older adults are at a higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness and death. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that 8 out of 10 Covid-19 deaths reported in United States have been among adults age 65 years old and older. Despite the high death rates, there is still a lack of information and data on Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) older adults, which is important in assessing the health impact of COVID-19 on these populations. Additionally, since.... Read More

             

Study Seeks to Understand Arab American Health During COVID-19

By Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared in Arab American News.

DEARBORN — A new research project seeks to better understand how social and behavioral aspects of everyday life affect the health and wellness of those aged 65 and older in Metro Detroit.

A special component of this research, led by University of Michigan professor Kristine Ajrouch, PhD, will study the social components of health among Arab Americans in the age group, who have often been overlooked in past studies due to certain limitations.

As such, households in the Arab American enclave of Dearborn can expect to receive letters from the Detroit Area Wellness Network (DAWN) project starting in January, asking if there are qualified adults in their homes who would.... Read More

             

It’s Time to Meet the Needs of African American and Black Caregivers

This article originally appeared on the American Society on Aging, Generations Today.

Editor’s Note: This article represents the first in a series by the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) to be published in Generations Today. Articles are connected to ASA-hosted webinars; see end of article to register. The series of articles by the DEC highlights research from The Caregiving Initiative, a multiyear research project funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

As we navigate the COVID-19 pandemic, it is becoming increasingly clear that the virus disproportionately affects communities of color, American Indian, Alaska Native and LGBT communities. Of those affected, perhaps one of the most overlooked groups are diverse family caregivers who may be simultaneously caring for families, aging loved ones and.... Read More

             

SAGE’s COVID-19 Response

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

SAGE is committed to keeping our community and staff safe in the face of COVID-19. As we continue to navigate this global pandemic, we are reminded daily of the isolation and unique needs that our community faces. SAGE’s response to COVID-19 has required flexibility, innovation, and new approaches to challenges. Learn more about how SAGE is continuing to provide LGBT elders with programs, services, and support during this time.

 

 

Direct services with NY’s Department for the Aging

Since ceasing in-person congregate programming in mid-March, at the direction of NYC government, SAGE has.... Read More

             

Leading During the Most Uncertain of Times

by Katrina Dizon Mariategue. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

In August of this year, the SEARAC team hosted a virtual farewell for our fearless leader and Executive Director of over eight years, Quyen Dinh, as she prepared for her well-earned and much needed sabbatical. After six months of intense coaching and training, I suddenly found myself steering SEARAC’s work as an ally in the midst of a global pandemic, mass anxiety over the upcoming elections, and nationwide protests in support of the movement for black lives.

Internally, the SEARAC team also went through a lot of change as we welcomed and onboarded five new staff in a span of a few months, growing.... Read More

             

Caring for Those Who Care: Meeting the Needs of Southeast Asian American Caregivers

This article originally appeared on American Society on Aging.

Thursday, January 28, 2021 Start time 11:00 AM Pacific End time 12:30 PM Pacific Diverse Elders Coalition The John A Hartford Foundation SEARAC RRF Foundation for Aging Sponsored by the Diverse Elders Coalition Register now for FREE

Includes complimentary CEs

To request speech-to-text captioning during this event, please contact us.

This webinar will help providers further their understanding of the experiences of Southeast Asian American caregivers and improve their multicultural capacities to meet these caregivers’ needs. This webinar.... Read More

             

Sothy Neou

This video originally appeared on NAPCA’s blog.

 

Sothy Neou shares his story from surviving the infamous Khmer Rouge of Cambodia to seeking employment in the United States. Sothy’s story is one of courage, perseverance, and determination

As we continue to celebrate 40 for 40 – sharing the stories of our participants, current and past, you can read more stories. You can also donate now to support more seniors like.... Read More

             

Advice for Caregivers and People Living with Dementia

This article originally appeared on SF Bay Times.

 

By Dr. Marcy Adelman–

Shelly has been living with Alzheimer’s for several years now. Her wife Joan is her caregiver. Joan emailed me in search of a referral to someone who could advise her about Shelly’s sleep medications, which are no long working effectively. Shelly used to sleep through the night, but now Joan often finds Shelly standing by the front door in the middle of night.

Joan has secured the door in such a way that Shelly cannot open it by herself. She is not worried about Shelly opening the door and wandering off, a common occurrence in Shelly’s stage of Alzheimer’s. But she is worried that Shelly’s.... Read More

             

Vaccination Rates Among American Indians

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

Immunization against childhood diseases is regarded as one of the greatest public health achievements in the United States and worldwide. The benefit of vaccinations has been particularly notable for American Indian and Alaska Native people, who have suffered disproportionately from infectious diseases compared with the general U.S. population. Vaccination coverage among American Indian children is higher than national coverage levels for most vaccines. This finding contrasts with overall coverage estimates among all American Indians, which usually are slightly below national coverage levels.

From 2006 to 2010, CDC researchers reported that although disparities existed between white and American Indian and Alaska Native populations in 2001 to 2004, the findings from the latest surveys showed.... Read More

             
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