Getting older with HIV

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. It is also available in Spanish.

Every day, the number of older people living with HIV in the country and in the world increases. One reason is because treatments have improved and are helping people with the disease live longer. In the United States, almost half of the people with HIV are 50 years of age or older, many of whom were diagnosed with the virus when they were younger.

Yet thousands of older people get HIV each year, and most are less likely to be tested than younger people, so they may not know they have HIV. The signs of HIV / AIDS can be confused with the aches and pains of.... Read More

             

Connecting with Community

By Sally Ching. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

I knew from a very young age that I wanted to dedicate my life to fighting inequities. In what capacity, however, was something I struggled to identify until later in my life. I considered various career options and nearly pursued a few of them. It wasn’t until I reflected on the reason why this work was so important to me that I realized, no matter what I did, community always had to be at the center.

My parents came to the United States as Southeast Asian refugees. Like many immigrant parents, they encouraged me to work hard as a means for social mobility and instilled in me the.... Read More

             

It’s Time to Stop Neglecting the Needs of American Indian and Alaska Native Caregivers

This article originally appeared on Generations, American Society on Aging.

Editor’s Note: This article represents the second in a series by the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) to be published in Generations Today. Articles are connected to ASA-hosted webinars; see end of article to register. The series of articles by the DEC highlights research from The Caregiving Initiative, a multiyear research project funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

As is now well-known, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color. For American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, the virus has proven to be extremely deadly for people living in both rural and urban settings. Additionally, COVID-19 rates may be higher in this group due to persistent.... Read More

             

Why understanding the impact of the pandemic in Detroit’s Bangladeshi community is more complicated than you think.

By . This article originally appeared on Tostada Magazine.

Growing up in my Bangladeshi family in Hamtramck, I could literally hear someone turn on the shower next door. In the summer months, I could almost eavesdrop on entire conversations taking place through the windows. When I was younger, I remember having to keep the curtains closed at all times because our neighbors could see everything in our home if we left them open.

With homes less than five feet away from each other, often separated by only a narrow breezeway, people are cramped into one or two-story bungalows and two-flats. In some cases, two or three families live in intergenerational.... Read More

             

To Heal, We Need Community

The article originally appeared on SEARAC.

Dear SEARAC community members,

Over these last few weeks, SEARAC has joined Asian Americans across the country in grief and in alarm over the ongoing anti-Asian violence recently culminating in a nationwide series of separate attacks on our elders. Our hearts go out to the victims of these horrific acts and their families.

This surge in anti-Asian hate against our communities has hit close to home, directly impacting our SEARAC family. Our Board Vice Chair, Kathy Duong, recently shared her mother’s traumatic experience as one such victim. In describing the support needed for her mother to heal from this incident, Kathy urges, “What my mother needs to heal is a sense of.... Read More

             

A Caregiver’s Guide to Visiting your Loved One in a Hospital or Nursing Home During COVID-19

By Dr. Eboni Green. This article originally appeared on Caregiver Support Services.

COVID-19 restrictions have made it difficult to visit your loved one if they live in a nursing home or are in the hospital. While these restrictions exist to keep everyone safe, it can be emotionally distressing for both you and your loved one to go for extended periods of time without seeing one another. The following are helpful tips that you can use to approach the issue of visiting your loved one in a hospital or nursing home during COVID-19:

Family Caregivers are Essential

Nursing homes and hospitals have enacted policies to protect workers, patients, and family caregivers from COVID-19. But it often leaves family caregivers.... Read More

             

Op-ed: It’s Time to Make Dementia Patients and Their Caregivers COVID19 Priorities

The co-authors of this piece are listed below the article.

There’s a hidden crisis playing out in the shadows of COVID-19. It is one of many insidious injustices that have long plagued Black and Latino communities and families: dementia. New research finds that Black Americans with dementia are nearly three times as likely as White people to become infected with COVID-19.

The time is long overdue for our public health actions to make abundantly clear that people with dementia and the many caregivers who love them are not disposable.

The inability of state and federal.... Read More

             

Science moved at unprecedented speed to develop vaccines against the new coronavirus. It was too fast for some Latinos—especially those egged on my myth and misinformation.

By Jenny Manrique. This article originally appeared on Palabra.

Read in Spanish and see the video in Spanish with English subtitles: https://www.palabranahj.org/archive/contra-vacuna

On the ranch where Gabriela Navarrete was raised in the northern Mexican state of Chihuahua, she learned early on that the land could provide what she needed to cure her ills. Mesquite bark, olive oil, corn vinegar and baking soda were useful for treating everything from joint pains to throat infections. In case of indigestion, the medicine was a good old stomach rub.

Navarrete, 69, passed on to her three daughters and one son the lesson that “everything natural is what is good for the body.”

So when the COVID-19 pandemic began, she quickly stocked up.... Read More

             

How to Stay Safe When Going Back Out in Public

By Ann Lloyd, This article originally appeared on Student Savings Guide.

No matter where you live, you’ve been asked to make an array of adjustments in the past six months to deal with the pandemic. 

You’ve started wearing a mask everywhere you go and learned to practice social distancing. You’ve changed your shopping habits to account for supply-chain issues and shortages. Maybe you’re caring for aging or at-risk loved ones — or receiving that kind of care, yourself. 

Now, however, transmission rates are slowing in some areas. A new vaccine may be on the horizon,.... Read More

             

Centering Vaccination Planning on Equity: Intersecting Considerations of Age, Race, and More

By Denny Chan. This article originally appeared on the Justice In Aging blog.

Like many older adults, Dorothy, the 72-year-old Chinese American in Seattle’s Chinatown, has had a tough year. She has been coping by mostly quarantining alone, with loved ones occasionally stopping by to bring essential groceries and household items. Months had passed by since she left the floor of her senior housing building, and one day when she went downstairs to her mailbox, she was startled to realize that she had forgotten how to open the mailbox door. Little things like that, on top of having to celebrate her upcoming 73rd birthday alone – contrary to the usual large family celebration with games and food – continue.... Read More

             
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