Seniors Experience Mental Stress Due to Closure of Chinese American Senior Centers

By Melody Cao, Sinovision.Net

Chinese video with English subtitles [http://video.sinovision.net/?id=62258&sts=1620857639061]

New York, NY — “The pandemic has lasted for so long. For the elderly and their families, there is a great mental stress.” Lina Chen, the head of the Happy House Adult Daycare Center in Brooklyn, expressed her worrisome of their senior members.

Lina, who has been engaged in community service work for a long time, started the Happy House Adult Daycare Center in 2012, providing living care and entertainment for Chinese American elderly living near U Avenue in Sheepshead Bay, Brooklyn.

“We had about 100 members at peak were here, there were about 100 members. Everyone is of Chinese descent from different countries. They speak different languages like.... Read More

             

LGBT Elders and the COVID-19 Vaccine

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

As more people across the U.S. access the vaccine, SAGE is working hard to ensure that LGBT elders receive reliable information and care. We want members of the older LGBT community to feel confident and safe in their decisions about the COVID-19 vaccine. Read more to access some resources from SAGE.

Statement from SAGE Member Alston Green

“The topic of COVID-19 is looming topic of most people worldwide, especially as this pandemic has impacted older adults and minority groups in particular. Many have met news of.... Read More

             

Diverse Elders Coalition Seeks $450 Million from American Jobs Plan to Deliver Equitable Access to Older Americans

 

In order to address the profound disparities when it comes to equitable access to health and wellness essentials, the Diverse Elders Coalition has recently submitted a proposal seeking $450 million of the $400 billion allocated in President Biden’s American Jobs Plan toward elder services and care. The funding would last for over eight (8) years to support equitable access to Older Americans Act programs and services for older people who are from racially and ethnically diverse, American Indian and Alaskan Native, and/or LGBT+ communities.

As of 2018, 23% of older Americans were members of racially and ethnically diverse communities; by 2040 that number will increase to 34%.  5% of older Americans are LGBT+, with more and more LGBT+ older.... Read More

             

April Remembrance: We are our ancestors’ wildest dreams

By Quyen Dinh. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

Dear SEARAC Community,

Six months ago, my husband and I became first-time parents.

In the middle of the pandemic, we welcomed into the world Khải Toyonori Ross.

In Vietnamese, Khải means victory, and in Japanese, Kai means ocean.

We wanted to connect him to both his Vietnamese and Japanese roots so that he would always know where he came from. So that he would always remember he is a descendant of refugees.

Across the country this month, Southeast Asian American communities remember our legacy as.... Read More

             

Why shouldn’t I postpone the appointment for my second dose of the vaccine?

This article originally appeared in Spanish on the NHCOA blog.

In the United States, more than 40% of adults have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, however, most approved COVID-19 vaccines require two doses to provide a level of adequate protection.

Delaying a second dose of the vaccine could put people at risk for any of the new variants and “are dangerously vulnerable to infection with variants that weaken the effects of antibodies,” according to recent statements by Dr. Anthony Faucci, chief epidemiologist. of the White House.

Another dangerous point is that, when receiving the first dose, and not returning for the second, the person runs the risk of being left with a false sense of security. You may even mistakenly.... Read More

             

Getting older with HIV

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. It is also available in Spanish.

Every day, the number of older people living with HIV in the country and in the world increases. One reason is because treatments have improved and are helping people with the disease live longer. In the United States, almost half of the people with HIV are 50 years of age or older, many of whom were diagnosed with the virus when they were younger.

Yet thousands of older people get HIV each year, and most are less likely to be tested than younger people, so they may not know they have HIV. The signs of HIV / AIDS can be confused with the aches and pains of.... Read More

             

Connecting with Community

By Sally Ching. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

I knew from a very young age that I wanted to dedicate my life to fighting inequities. In what capacity, however, was something I struggled to identify until later in my life. I considered various career options and nearly pursued a few of them. It wasn’t until I reflected on the reason why this work was so important to me that I realized, no matter what I did, community always had to be at the center.

My parents came to the United States as Southeast Asian refugees. Like many immigrant parents, they encouraged me to work hard as a means for social mobility and instilled in me the.... Read More

             

It’s Time to Stop Neglecting the Needs of American Indian and Alaska Native Caregivers

This article originally appeared on Generations, American Society on Aging.

Editor’s Note: This article represents the second in a series by the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) to be published in Generations Today. Articles are connected to ASA-hosted webinars; see end of article to register. The series of articles by the DEC highlights research from The Caregiving Initiative, a multiyear research project funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

As is now well-known, the COVID-19 pandemic has had a disproportionate impact on communities of color. For American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities, the virus has proven to be extremely deadly for people living in both rural and urban settings. Additionally, COVID-19 rates may be higher in this group due to persistent.... Read More

             

Why understanding the impact of the pandemic in Detroit’s Bangladeshi community is more complicated than you think.

By . This article originally appeared on Tostada Magazine.

Growing up in my Bangladeshi family in Hamtramck, I could literally hear someone turn on the shower next door. In the summer months, I could almost eavesdrop on entire conversations taking place through the windows. When I was younger, I remember having to keep the curtains closed at all times because our neighbors could see everything in our home if we left them open.

With homes less than five feet away from each other, often separated by only a narrow breezeway, people are cramped into one or two-story bungalows and two-flats. In some cases, two or three families live in intergenerational.... Read More

             

To Heal, We Need Community

The article originally appeared on SEARAC.

Dear SEARAC community members,

Over these last few weeks, SEARAC has joined Asian Americans across the country in grief and in alarm over the ongoing anti-Asian violence recently culminating in a nationwide series of separate attacks on our elders. Our hearts go out to the victims of these horrific acts and their families.

This surge in anti-Asian hate against our communities has hit close to home, directly impacting our SEARAC family. Our Board Vice Chair, Kathy Duong, recently shared her mother’s traumatic experience as one such victim. In describing the support needed for her mother to heal from this incident, Kathy urges, “What my mother needs to heal is a sense of.... Read More

             
Page 2 of 10112345...102030...Last »