How to Attract a Job Recruiter Using LinkedIn

Competition is fierce, so here’s how you can help get a recruiter’s attention

By Nancy Collamer. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog

Catching the attention of a job recruiter has long been a challenge, but it’s especially difficult right now. In the week ending July 24, 2020, 1.4 million Americans filed for unemployment, marking the 19th straight week that jobless claims have topped one million.

Still, since over 90% of job recruiters and hiring managers use LinkedIn to fill their openings, if you’re looking for work, you’ll want to know how to use that platform to catch a recruiter’s eye. For advice, I spoke with Shally Steckerl, founder of The Sourcing Institute and The Sourcing Institute.... Read More

             

Understanding the Impact of COVID on the LGBTQI Movement

This article originally appeared on the LGBT MAP blog

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted all of us, making 2020 a year filled with challenges like no other. For individuals and families, workers and businesses, and social change organizations like LGBTQI and allied social justice organizations, COVID-19 has upended how we learn, work, and connect.

To understand.... Read More

             

When Your Employer Insists You Go Into Work During the Pandemic

The recourse rules for employees are complicated and somewhat untested

By Rosie Wolf Williams. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Millions of Americans have been instructed by their employers to work from home due to the coronavirus pandemic. But what if your boss insists you continue coming into your workplace, especially if you’re dealing with an autoimmune deficiency, going through medical treatments or recovering from an illness? Do you have any recourse?

The question is a piercing one for some workers right now, since showing up could increase their risk of contracting COVID-19. And the answer is complicated.

Denied the Ability.... Read More
             

An Intergenerational, Multiracial, Virtual Friendship Formed in COVID-19

The story of one 65-year-old and his new Gen Z friend

By  Sarah McKinney Gibson. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

While Los Angeles was on lockdown and Black Lives Matter protesters were marching in the streets, Mark Robinson and Ava Brennan were looking forward to their weekly Zoom conversations, discussing everything from sports to LGBT advocacy. When Robinson (63 and Black) brought up the topic of racial justice, Brennan (17 and white) was initially nervous to express her views.

“I didn’t want to come off as a teenager who knows everything and thinks older people are out of touch,” says Brennan. “And I also didn’t want to be lectured about my political beliefs.”

She.... Read More

             

Be a SAGE Voter

This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

In preparation for the 2020 election, SAGE has partnered with When We All Vote. This partnership is a way for SAGE voters to help strengthen our democracy by increasing voter participation among all Americans, especially underrepresented populations. With LGBT elders currently facing disproportionate consequences from COVID-19, such as health risks and social isolation, it is more important than ever that we make our voices heard at the polls. Whether you’re an LGBT elder, an ally, or a member of the community, your vote can enact lasting change. Voting is a way for all of us to honor the LGBT pioneers who have been fighting for decades for their right to live.... Read More

             

HIV/AIDS and Safety During COVID-19

The CDC has advised all people with HIV to take precautions

By Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the STILL HERE, STILL POSITIVE SPECIAL REPORT

(Editor’s note: This story is part of Still Here, Still Positive: A series on the first generation of Americans aging with HIV/AIDS, with support from The John A. Hartford Foundation.)

As part of our special series “Still Here, Still Positive,” we’ve been covering the realities of people aging with HIV/AIDS. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says “the risk of serious illness from COVID-19 for people with HIV is not known,” though people with HIV/AIDS.... Read More

             

The Ways the Pandemic Has Influenced Our Eating Habits

More cooking, more uncertainty, less exercise and less sleep have taken their toll

By Randi Mazzella. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Last week, my husband and I decided since outdoor dining resumed in our state, we would go out to dinner. For the first time in several months, I decided to get dressed up. I noticed that all my “real” pants felt snug at the waist.

The pandemic and staying at home had changed my eating habits immensely. Over the past few months, dinner had become the focal point of our family’s day. I was cooking more elaborate meals. Indulging in.... Read More

             

No Gym? No Worries — How to Stay Fit at Home

Plus: the right amount of exercise to stay healthy during the pandemic

By Sheryl Jean. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Since his gym closed, you might find Tom Hippman, 55, working out to Journey’s “Eye of the Tiger” in his Dallas living room, using whatever props he can find.

He’s been doing sit-ups against the wall, deadlifting 64-load bottles of Woolite, running through his parking garage and other exercises for 45 minutes a day.

“Being in a seven-hundred-square-foot apartment is a little more challenging,” Hippman says. “I’ve taken it on as a challenge.”

Many people are spending more time at home.... Read More

             

Celebrating the resilience of the Hispanic community facing adversity

This article originally appeared in Spanish and English on the NHCOA blog to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Over the years, many Hispanic communities have faced various disparities in the United States. However, thanks to hard work, perseverance and courage of our people, today more than ever, Latino voices resonate in the struggle for a diverse, just and free country for all. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age,” that means, all of these elements contribute to a person’s health status. These determinants of health greatly define the differences in the quality of life experienced by different groups and if these disparities.... Read More

             

What’s Pride Got to Do with it? Black and Indigenous Erasure in HIV and Public Health

Andrew Jolivette, PhD, calls on the queer community to truly center Black and Indigenous queer, trans and Two-Spirit people in solidarity and kinship.

By Andrew Jolivette, PhD. This article originally appeared on the San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s BETA Blog.

When I was in my early twenties I never thought much about the linkages between my racial/ethnic identities and my sexuality as a gay man of color. I had many experiences within the gay community of San Francisco where I grew up. The neighborhood (Bayview/Hunters Point) where I came of age was predominantly African.... Read More

             
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