To Eliminate Race Disparities in Diabetes, We Must Address Social Determinants of Health

by Susan Buchanan. This article originally appeared in the Louisiana Weekly.

In the United States, diabetes is most prevalent among Southerners and residents of Appalachian regions. Blacks are afflicted more than whites. Over a third of African American seniors are diagnosed as diabetic.

The prevalence of diabetes increases with age, Kelly Zimmerman, spokeswoman for Louisiana’s Department of Health, said last week. Adults ages 65 and older had the highest rate in the state last year at 26.1 percent. Diabetes among all of Louisiana’s adults 18 years and above was 13.6 percent. For the state’s African American adults of.... Read More

             

NAPCA Gives Thanks!

As 2018 comes to an end with the start of the holiday season, we at the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) take time to pause, reflect and give thanks as we are grateful for so many things: our experienced Board of Directors for their sound leadership, our hardworking and talented staff for their dedication to supporting Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) elders in aging with dignity and integrity, our many community partners for their commitment to providing excellent direct services and last but not least, our funders and individual donors for their trust and support in NAPCA’s mission and values.

Through continued funding from the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S..... Read More

             

SAGEPositive: How SAGE cares for long-term survivors of HIV

By Aspen Christian. This article was originally published on the SAGE Blog.

Did you know that by the year 2020, 70 percent of the people living with HIV in the United States will be over the age of 50? How about that older adults (age 50 and up) account for 17 percent of all new HIV diagnoses in the United States?

The 30th annual World AIDS Day was this past Saturday, December 1st, and this year’s theme is “Know your status.” Knowing your status gives you powerful information to keep you and your potential partners healthy. SAGE can refer you to places across New York State where you can.... Read More

             

Major Steps toward Affordable Housing in Austin, Texas

by Pramod Sukumaran. This article originally appeared on Salud America.

Access to safe, affordable housing is a priority for good health.

Access to housing protects families and promotes feelings of security that can reduce stress. Affordable housing located near safe parks, full-service grocery stores, and living-wage employment helps to build community and encourages healthy eating and exercise.

Two new initiatives will try to help solve the lack of affordable housing in Austin, Texas (34.5% Latino).

$250 Million for Affordable Housing

In November 2018, Austin voters overwhelmingly approved a $250 million bond for affordable housing.

Here’s where the.... Read More

             

The spirit of the Gray Panthers stirs to life at GSA national meeting

By Barbara Peters Smith. This article originally appeared in the Herald Tribune.

The atmosphere at this year’s meeting of the Gerontological Society of America — scientists and social scientists who study the last third of the human lifespan — struck me as less theoretical than ever before. And more, well, feisty.

It could have been the effect of a hotel workers’ strike that made attending conference events a constant moral calculation — with marching and drumming service employees an ever-present reminder of the broadening economic gap between those who get to lie on “heavenly” pillowtop mattresses and those whose task it is to change the sheets.

But it was also clear.... Read More

             

Honoring Native Heritage and Supporting American Indian/Alaska Native Elders


Photo by R. Madison

American Indian and Alaska Native Elders are the heart and soul of Native communities across the United States, and indigenous traditions of dance, food, cuisine and language around the world continue to thrive. We join our member organization, the National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA), in celebrating the rich heritage of the more than 500 unique tribal nations across the United States and the Elders who are preserving and passing those traditions down to future generations.This Native American Heritage Month, we’re sharing highlights from the Diverse Elders Coalition blog throughout 2018, including:

The Importance of Good Sleep for Elders: “Not only do Elders.... Read More
             

Its Flu Season! Don’t Wait, Get Vaccinated!

Flu season is upon us! It is so important for people 65 years and older to get vaccinated because they are at greater risk of serious complications from the flu. While flu seasons can vary in severity, during most seasons, people 65 years and older have the greatest weight of severe flu disease. In recent years, it’s estimated that roughly 70 to 85 percent of seasonal flu-related deaths have occurred in people 65 years and older. It is particularly important for Hispanic older adults, as historically, Hispanic adults were 30 percent less likely to have received the flu shot compared to non-Hispanic whites.

.... Read More
             

We’re hiring! Are you our next Program Associate?

The Diverse Elders Coalition is currently seeking a part-time Program Associate to support the coalition’s national Caregiving in Diverse Communities initiative. The Program Associate will assist with research related to caregiving for older adults, manage documents and databases, schedule and record in-person and phone-based meetings, and assist with other project-related tasks as needed.

We’re looking for someone who is interested in issues of health equity, aging and caregiving; who is an independent, hard worker with great interpersonal skills; and who excels at using digital tools like social media, online document storage, and collaborative project software to work with our.... Read More

             

SEARAC Toolkit Sheds Light on Public Charge Proposal

The Trump Administration has proposed broadening the set of government services considered when determining whether an individual is a ‘public charge,’ a term applied to someone who is likely to rely on government assistance for support. If a person is considered a public charge, they may be denied a green card.

Seniors and parents of U.S. citizens are a significant, and growing, segment of immigrants to the U.S. and are critical to the well-being of intergenerational families. Between 1990 and 2010, the number of immigrants age 65 and older grew from 2.7 million to nearly 5 million. The number of parents of U.S. citizens who have been admitted as legal permanent residents more than tripled between 1994 and 2016. In making it.... Read More

             
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