No Gym? No Worries — How to Stay Fit at Home

Plus: the right amount of exercise to stay healthy during the pandemic

By Sheryl Jean. This article originally appeared on the Next Avenue blog.

Part of the THE CORONAVIRUS OUTBREAK: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW SPECIAL REPORT

Since his gym closed, you might find Tom Hippman, 55, working out to Journey’s “Eye of the Tiger” in his Dallas living room, using whatever props he can find.

He’s been doing sit-ups against the wall, deadlifting 64-load bottles of Woolite, running through his parking garage and other exercises for 45 minutes a day.

“Being in a seven-hundred-square-foot apartment is a little more challenging,” Hippman says. “I’ve taken it on as a challenge.”

Many people are spending more time at home.... Read More

             

Celebrating the resilience of the Hispanic community facing adversity

This article originally appeared in Spanish and English on the NHCOA blog to commemorate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Over the years, many Hispanic communities have faced various disparities in the United States. However, thanks to hard work, perseverance and courage of our people, today more than ever, Latino voices resonate in the struggle for a diverse, just and free country for all. 

The World Health Organization (WHO) defines the social determinants of health as “the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work and age,” that means, all of these elements contribute to a person’s health status. These determinants of health greatly define the differences in the quality of life experienced by different groups and if these disparities.... Read More

             

What’s Pride Got to Do with it? Black and Indigenous Erasure in HIV and Public Health

Andrew Jolivette, PhD, calls on the queer community to truly center Black and Indigenous queer, trans and Two-Spirit people in solidarity and kinship.

By Andrew Jolivette, PhD. This article originally appeared on the San Francisco AIDS Foundation’s BETA Blog.

When I was in my early twenties I never thought much about the linkages between my racial/ethnic identities and my sexuality as a gay man of color. I had many experiences within the gay community of San Francisco where I grew up. The neighborhood (Bayview/Hunters Point) where I came of age was predominantly African.... Read More

             

Pandemic Increases Emotional Toll on Informal Caregivers in Post-Hurricane Puerto Rico

By Mayra Acevedo. This article originally appeared in Spanish on Medicina Salud Publica

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico — While many co-workers in the media have been laid off because of the economic crisis the Puerto Rico was already facing before the Covid-19 pandemic, Carla, 35, and one of our best video editors at WIPR, arranged to work part time. One thing she cannot afford is getting sick with the coronavirus.

“Since the pandemic I only go to work and resolve moms’ basic needs. Because I’m worried mom might get sick I don’t do a lot of.... Read More

             

COVID-19, aging, dementia and social bonds; an Arab American perspective

By Hassan Abbas. This article originally appeared on Arab American News

 

DEARBORN, Mich. – COVID-19 has been a difficult ordeal for Sylvana Berry, 24, and her family. Berry is extremely close to, and has been directly involved in the care of her grandmother, Samira Baghdadi, who has Alzheimer’s Disease.

Baghdadi migrated to the U.S. in 1976 with her husband and six children, escaping from the Lebanese Civil War. She ran a resale shop in Detroit with her family.

Things changed for the large but tight-knit family once they learned their beloved matriarch was having trouble remembering things. Back in 2007, it was Berry and her sister Selena who noticed changes in their grandmother, like when she would get lost on her.... Read More

             

SAGEVets and Black Veterans For Social Justice Honor BLM

This article was originally published on the SAGE Blog

SAGEVets Program Manager Ashton Stewart and Administrative Coordinator Arnold Lewis gave remarks at the July 7 Veterans Rally, Because Black Lives Matter!, organized by SAGEVets partner Black Veterans For Social Justice, Inc. (BVSJ). The rally took place in front of the Brooklyn War Memorial commemorating the 11,500 Brooklyn service members who died during WWII, and across from Juneteenth Grove, that was recently established by NYC Parks. The program began with a recording of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s I Have a Dream to set the stage for a series of fiery, passionate speeches from Congresswoman Yvette Clarke, Councilmember Robert Cornegy, decorated Vietnam War Veteran and President of Veterans Action Group Herbert Sweat; Deputy Director of.... Read More

             

Navigating Mental Health as a Khmer Social Worker

By Nary Rath. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog

My mom arrived to the United States in 1983 fleeing from war and genocide to seek refuge. She was 21 years old when she started a new life in Ohio and then set roots in Connecticut, where she raised my older sister and me. Rebuilding her life in this country has led to opportunities never imaginable for my family in Cambodia, but the exposure to pre- and post-migration trauma continues to be felt by entire communities of Southeast Asian Americans (SEAAs).

Surviving genocide, long-term exposure to violence, displacement, and anti-immigrant racism in the United States are all factors that contribute to the high prevalence of mental health issues.... Read More

             

Shortchanged Shawnee Tribe Sues U.S. Treasury

This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog

The Shawnee Tribe, which is headquartered in Miami, filed a federal lawsuit against U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin last month, alleging the tribe was stiffed about $6 million in Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act relief funds. The federal treasury had based its distribution on a database that incorrectly listed the Shawnee Tribe’s tribal enrollment as zero when it actually has 3,021 tribal citizens, the lawsuit states.

In the Shawnee Tribe’s federal lawsuit, which was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Oklahoma, the tribe claims the U.S. Treasury Department disregarded the tribe’s population data and instead used HUD Indian Housing Block Grant data that doesn’t count.... Read More

             

Influenza vs COVID-19: What’s the difference?

This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog

As we approach flu season, it is important to know the difference and similarities between the flu and COVID-19. Although influenza and COVID-19 have similar symptoms, they affect the body and health and wellbeing of people differently. So how can we tell the difference between the two diseases? Influenza, or the flu, and COVID-19 are both contagious respiratory diseases; however they are caused by different viruses. COVID-19 is caused by one virus, the novel coronavirus called SARS-CoV-2. The flu is caused by any of several different types and strains of influenza virus.

Read More

             

Black and Brown Health Care Workers More Likely to Get COVID-19

This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

Health care workers of color were more likely to care for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19, more likely to report using inadequate or reused protective gear, and nearly twice as likely as white colleagues to test positive for the coronavirus, a new study from Harvard Medical School researchers found.

The study also showed that health care workers are at least three times more likely than the general public to report a positive COVID test, with risks rising for workers treating COVID patients.

Dr. Andrew Chan, a senior.... Read More

             
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