Eczema Symptoms Found to Be Worse for African Americans

by Ryan Whirty. This article originally appeared in The Louisiana Weekly.

All skin – and a particular skin disorder – is not the same, as a recent study into the effects and symptoms of eczema, a frustratingly itchy, often painful and potentially embarrassing affliction of the dermis, shows.

In a study published in September in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology – the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology – researchers examined the molecular differences between the skin of African Americans with atopic dermatitis (the formal name for eczema).... Read More

             

The First Loss is the Deepest

This article originally appeared in A&U Magazine.

Every long-term HIV survivor on the planet has stories to tell about friends, lovers, co-workers, and/or family members whom they lost to the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s and 90s. Anyone familiar with my writing knows the importance I place on our storytelling, our sharing our stories ourselves, to avoid the “straight-washing” of our history that happens when we let others tell our stories. With that in mind, this is a story about the first of my friends to die.

Dean died first. In early 1982. For about a year, we had.... Read More

             

National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum and Southeast Asia Resource Action Center Host Immigration Report Briefings on Capitol Hill

On September 26th and 27th, the National Asian Pacific American Women’s Forum (NAPAWF) and the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) hosted briefings on Capitol Hill to help educate and inform elected officials and their staff about the impact of immigration policy on Southeast Asian American (SEAA) communities. During the sessions, the groups discussed findings from their new joint immigration report, “Dreams Detained, in her Words: The effects of detention and deportation on Southeast Asian American women and families,” and women who were interviewed in the immigration report attended the briefings.... Read More

             

Elder Justice is LGBT Justice!

by Sherrill Wayland, MSW, Manager of National Projects for SAGE.

Elder Justice is LGBT Justice! Whether LGBT older people protested in the streets, founded organizations, or just managed to survive times of social unrest, they laid the groundwork for the progress all LGBT people now enjoy.

Over the past year, SAGE  and FORGE collaborated with the National Center on Elder Abuse to create a series of fact sheets that engage, empower, and advocate for elder justice for LGBT older people, their caregivers, and community organizations.

To develop these fact sheets, SAGE conducted focus.... Read More

             

Childhood Memories of Racial Discrimination

by Leslie Hunter-Gadsden. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

In my childhood neighborhood, “moving on up” meant a 1970 move from our New York City apartment on 155th Street between Broadway and Amsterdam Avenues to a three-room apartment in a building on Riverside Drive West, near 159th Street in Washington Heights. The building was part of a six-unit, seven-story, multiple dwelling, facing the Hudson River and New Jersey, with the George Washington Bridge just to the north and clearly visible from the front entrance.

Back then, the building featured apartments for rent, but by the early 1980s, it converted to mostly co-op apartments. I turned 10 the year my mother and I moved in, and we lived.... Read More

             

National Employ Older Workers Week (NEOWW) Now and Forever!

The last full week in September is celebrated annually as “National Employ Older Workers Week,” (#NEOWW) recognizing the vital role older workers play in the workforce. Aiming to increase awareness of this labor force and develop strategies to expand opportunities for older workers, we at the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) use this time to celebrate older workers and their contribution to the workforce in the past, the present and the future.

According to U.S. Department of Labor statistics, the United States is undergoing a dramatic demographic shift. The average median age of the U.S.... Read More

             

Diverse Elders Coalition Receives $549,679 Grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation to Support Family Caregivers

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 17, 2018

Contact: Jenna McDavid, National Managing Coordinator
646-653-5015 / jmcdavid@diverseelders.org

New York, NY – The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) is the recipient of a $549,679 planning grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation to identify and address the unique needs of family caregivers in racially and ethnically diverse communities, American Indian and Alaska Native communities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT) communities. “Addressing Unmet Family Caregiving Needs in Diverse Older Communities” will provide funding to the DEC to research disparities in access to linguistically and culturally competent health care and social services among those served by the coalition and develop programs that will meet those caregivers’ unique needs.

.... Read More
             

Chinese elders ‘walk the middle path’ to better mental health

by Liz Tung and Jad Sleiman. This article was originally published by WHYY.

It’s a Friday morning, and the Selfhelp Benjamin Rosenthal Senior Center in Flushing, Queens is bustling with activity.

In one room, around two-dozen Asian seniors are practicing tai chi. Nearby, another group rehearses an opera, their voices rising above the reedy twang of traditional Chinese instruments.

But Jane Qiu, the program director here, says Selfhelp’s seniors weren’t always so engaged.

“By observation, I can see some members, when they came here, were so sad and just crying,” Qiu says. “And now they are just involved in all activities, smiling. You can see their faces here, just fewer couch potatoes.”

Selfhelp is one of 25.... Read More

             
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