Tackling Latino health, caregiving and housing is key as older population grows

    By Laura Castañeda. This article originally appeared on NBC News.

    Eduardo Covarrubias retired from his job as a museum security guard in Washington, D.C., 14 years ago and moved to Casa Iris, an affordable housing community for older adults.

    The complex has 39 one-bedroom, 1,000-square-foot apartments for people ages 62 and older that cost a maximum of $813 per month, depending on income. To compare, the average one-bedroom apartment in the nation’s capital runs $2,213 monthly.

    “It’s peaceful. There are good people living here and the administration is very efficient,” Covarrubias, 79, said in Spanish, adding that he would have had to move back to his native Bolivia long ago if not for Casa Iris.

    Older.... Read More

                 

    The Importance of Latino Representation in Health Research

    By NHCOA Media. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

    Precision medicine is a new approach to disease treatment and prevention that considers differences in people’s lifestyles, environment, and biological makeup, including their genetics.

    Many groups, especially communities of color, have been historically underrepresented in health research. This disparity was highlighted with the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected different demographic groups in the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic made this disparity even more visible as the pandemic has affected every community differently. A 2021 study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association analyzed 230 medical trials in the United States between 2011 and 2020 and found that, of those that reported race,.... Read More

                 

    We Must Support Our Hispanic/Latinx Caregivers

    By Yanira Cruz and Ocean Le. This article appeared on the American Society on Aging (ASA), Generations Today | July-August 2021

    Editor’s Note: This article represents the fifth in a series by the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) to be published in Generations Today. Articles are connected to ASA-hosted webinars; see end of article to register. The series of articles by the DEC highlights research from The Caregiving Initiative, a multiyear research project funded by The John A. Hartford Foundation.

    The 2020 pandemic has brought up many problems for Hispanic/Latinx communities, and highlighted multiple preexisting health inequities identified in our 2019 national caregiving survey, particularly for Hispanic/Latinx caregivers. These inequities still exist and have proven problematic as we strive to vaccinate the.... Read More

                 

    Protecting Elders in a Pandemic World

    By Jatika H. Patterson. This article originally appeared on The Atlanta Voice.

    At the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, two of the first regulations from the World Health Organization (WHO) were self-quarantining and social distancing.

    As many of us did our best to stay six feet away from each other in grocery stores, jobs, walking the streets, that new regulation affected our abilities to care and watch over our aging population at home and in elder care facilities leaving them vulnerable to the evils of elder abuse.

    Many videos surfaced on social media of creative ways families kept in contact with nursing home residents. They chatted on cell phones while seeing them through windows, yelling out of windows.... Read More

                 

    Mental Health Services Needed to Treat Emotional Distress During the Pandemic

    By Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in SF Bay Times.

    Jan is a 71-year-old lesbian and a diabetic. She lives alone and prides herself on her independence. She is quick to tell you she is a happily retired jack of all trades and now an aspiring photographer. Pre-pandemic she enjoyed doing portraits but COVID-19 and shelter in place (CSIP) put the portraits on hold. She is concerned that diabetes and her compromised immune system put her at greater risk for COVID-19.

    From March to May, Jan rarely left her apartment. By mid-May she found herself feeling stressed and out of sorts. She told me for the San Francisco Bay Times, “It was like I was anxious all the.... Read More

                 

    Tag team approach to healthcare reaches older adults in Bangladeshi community during COVID-19 pandemic

    by This article originally appeared in Tostada Magazine.

     

    Typically, Farzana Noor, a nurse practitioner at the Children’s Clinic of Michigan in Hamtramck is accustomed to bandaging up cuts and scrapes, treating colds, and soothing fussing children getting their first shots.

    That all changed last year when the pandemic raged through the Bangladeshi community in Hamtramck. When nearby healthcare providers abruptly ceased operations amid the crisis, Noor began seeing an influx of older Bangladeshi women patients who often serve as the primary caregivers spanning generations in their households enter her office.

    Noor, who is Bangladeshi American, found herself in familiar territory as many of the older patients were accompanied by their.... Read More

                 

    National Immunization Awareness Month: The COVID-19 Vaccine & Daily Life in Diverse Communities

    DEC staff members, Nina Darby and Ocean Le sat down to have a talk about the unique realities of diverse communities amid the pandemic and the implications of the COVID-19 vaccine. 

    Ocean: Hey Nina! Firstly, I just want to say welcome to the DEC team! We are so lucky to have you and its great knowing that we have a dedicated trainer to help others comprehend the unique issues, realities, and experiences of the diverse communities we serve. With that being said, I am excited to speaking to you about todays’ topic. As you know, August is National Immunization Month and so I wanted to talk about the COVID-19 vaccine and some of the general implications it has on daily life in diverse communities.  

    Nina: Hey.... Read More

                 

    What is Caregiver Burnout?

    By NHCOA. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

    The caregiver syndrome refers to those people who suffer physical, psychological, and general health exhaustion due to the constant and continuous care of a patient.

    Caregiver burnout—also known as caregiver stress or caregiver syndrome—was first described by the American psychologist Herbert Freudenberger in 1974. The mental health professional worked in a clinic for drug addicts in New York and observed that most of the volunteers at the clinic had a progressive loss of energy, leading to exhaustion, symptoms of anxiety and depression, as well as lack of motivation at work and aggressiveness with patients after a year of working.

    This is a disorder with serious implications both physically.... Read More

                 

    Larry Curley Joins ASA’s Legacy Interviews

    This originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    On July 21 National Indian Council on Aging Executive Director Larry Curley will take part in the American Society on Aging’s Legacy Interviews. This will be one of a 12-week webcast series that will feature interviews with diverse legendary pathfinders who have spent decades in the field of aging, health and social services.

    Each interview will be conducted by Ken Dychtwald, to capture the wisdom and character of gerontology’s pioneers to inform, inspire and guide current and future professionals in the fields of aging and related services for years to come.

    These conversations will delve into topics such as:

    How our healthcare, financial, social services and infrastructure systems can better support older adults.... Read More
                 

    Proud, Resilient, and SAGEStrong

    This article originally appeared on SAGE blog.

    SAGE-Pride-SAGEStrong-logo

     

    The past year has forced us all to be adaptable, tenacious, and compassionate. But this was not our elders’ first pandemic and it was not the first time they had to come together to support one another through hard times. This year especially, we are PROUD to be a part of such a strong and resilient community.

    This Pride season, SAGE will be celebrating the collective strength of our LGBT pioneers and our community. Strength comes in many different forms – the strength of character, personal and professional talents,.... Read More

                 

    Looking for our next Strategic Planning Consultant!

    The DEC is seeking to hire a consultant/consulting agency to help with our 2021 strategic planning process. This includes identifying the coalition’s priority advocacy areas, priority program areas, and plans to increase direct engagement with older adults from the diverse communities that make up our six-member organizations. Help us build out the DEC’s next phase of work!

    We will be accepting proposals until July 6th, 2021! See the RFP here: DEC Strategic Plan 2021 RFP

     

     

    .... Read More
                 

    COVID-19 and transplant patients

    By NHCOA Media. This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

    Although it is not known exactly if COVID-19 will be more severe in transplant patients, it is known that the disease is frequently more severe in people with weak immune systems—which includes transplant patients. Immunosuppressants are drugs that weaken the immune system to reduce the chance that the body will reject the transplanted organ. However, it is more difficult for a weakened immune system to fight an infection.

    The best way to stay healthy if you receive immunosuppressive treatment is to avoid being exposed to the virus. Continue to practice daily preventive actions to help reduce your risk of getting sick, such as:

    Avoid close contact with people.... Read More
                 
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