What Is At Stake For Vietnamese Communities If The Affordable Care Act Is Struck Down?

    by Quynh Chi Nguyen. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

    Every year on April 30, many Vietnamese living across the globe commemorate what they term the end of the Vietnamese war (also known as the American war in Vietnam). Whatever side we were on, the war and its aftermath forever remain painful and frightening and continue to affect the health and wellbeing of the Vietnamese population.

    After the war, my family and I joined over a million other Vietnamese immigrants who made the journey to reside in the.... Read More

                 

    Blue Zones, Part 2: How the World’s Oldest People in Asia and Europe Make Their Money Last

    by Rich Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    (In 2008, National Geographic writer Dan Buettner published his bestselling book, The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, about the five “longevity pockets” around the world. For this weekly series, Next Avenue Money and Work & Purpose editor Richard Eisenberg, a Gerontological Society of America Journalists in Aging Fellow, takes a different look at the Blue Zones — places where there’s a high concentration of people living past 90 without chronic illnesses. Rather than focusing on the residents’ diets, he reports on how the oldest people in the Blue Zones make their money last and what Americans and America.... Read More

                 

    The Importance of Food Sovereignty

    by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    A poor diet now causes more deaths than tobacco smoking and high blood pressure. A healthier diet pattern is associated with 25 percent lower likelihood of developing physical impairment with aging. According to a 27-year global diet analysis published this month in the journal the Lancet, one in five deaths globally — that’s about 11 million people — in 2017 occurred because of too much sodium and a lack of whole grains, fruits, nuts and seeds, rather than too much trans fats, sugar-sweetened drinks and high levels of red and processed meats.

    The Navajo Nation is the biggest and most populous reservation.... Read More

                 

    Success From The Mind Of Albert Harper

    by Xavier Jones. This article originally appeared in the Telegram Newspaper.

    If you ask 10 people their definitions of success, you might get 10 different responses. Google defines success as “the accomplishment of an aim or purpose.” World record holder, Albert “The Exercise Bandit” Harper describes success as motivation, a factor that drives his life in a positive direction.

    At age 66, Harper has been breaking world records for over 30 years. His world records include 45 push-ups on top of a brick with one finger, 50 push-ups on top of a potato with one thumb, and a record for push-ups on raw eggs, while balancing an egg on a spoon in his mouth, a record.... Read More

                 

    Blue Zones, Part 1: How the World’s Oldest People Make Their Money Last

    by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    (In 2008, National Geographic writer Dan Buettner published his bestselling book, The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, about the five “longevity pockets” around the world: The Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece; Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan and Loma Linda, Calif. For this weekly series, Next Avenue Money and Work & Purpose editor Richard Eisenberg, a Gerontological Society of America Journalists in Aging Fellow, takes a different kind of look at the Blue Zones. Rather than focusing on their diets, he reports on how the people in the Blue Zones make their money last their.... Read More

                 

    For Aging Immigrants, Food from Their Homelands Is Key to Happiness

    by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared on The Bold Italic.

    “Do you have drumsticks?” my 85-year-old mother asks the cashier at the checkout counter at Madras Groceries in Sunnyvale, California. The woman points to a pile of long, narrow, cylindrical vegetables near the counter. A half-hour later, a quick inventory of my mother’s cart reveals drumsticks, taro roots, squash, long beans, okra, winter melons, pointed gourd, snake gourd, spices, snack packets of murukkus and a bag of brown basmati rice.

    Food bought, cooked, served and eaten is collectively the barometer of my mother’s moods, which are intricately entangled with her health. When she’s bustling around the kitchen, cooking sambar, kootuor olan with squash and winter melon,.... Read More

                 

    Culturally Competent Care Resources for Providers Serving Dual Eligibles

    Dear Colleague,

    April was National Minority Health Month, and May is Older Americans Month. In observance, we invite you to explore our resources for delivering culturally and linguistically competent long-term services and supports (LTSS).

    Long-term services and supports (LTSS) are a vital part of care for many dually eligible beneficiaries. Nearly half (42 percent) of full-benefit dual eligibles used LTSS in 2013, including nursing facility services, adult day programs, home care, and personal care services. Individuals from racial and ethnic minority groups often experience disparities in access, quality, and outcomes.... Read More

                 

    Social Security Scammers Are Calling

    by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) is getting more reports about people pretending to be from the Social Security Administration (SSA) calling to get Social Security numbers and even money.

    This is a scam that is growing exponentially each year. In 2017, 3,200 people reported SSA imposter scams, and lost nearly $210,000, according to the FTC. Government imposter scams made up nearly half of the 535,417 imposter scams reported to the FTC in 2018.

    In one version of the scam,.... Read More

                 

    Quality of Life Enhanced for Seniors with Companion Animals

    by D. Kevin McNeir. This article originally appeared in the Washington Informer

    Much has been reported about a paradigm shift within American society which looms on the horizon and cannot be ignored: In less than 20 years, according to U.S. Census data, older adults will outnumber children for the first time in our history. On reaching that milestone in 2035, experts predict, the 78 million older Americans 65 or more will slightly outnumber the 76.7 million children under 18.

    Most of these seniors will be women, who have longer life expectancies than men and who will more than likely live at home with the assistance of family caregivers. The majority of the seniors will be baby.... Read More

                 

    States Need Pragmatic Policy Solutions to Better Support Family Caregivers

    by Rani Snyder, Program Director, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This blog originally appeared on The John A. Hartford Foundation website.

    Dear Colleagues—

    At JAHF we want to know how we can better support family caregivers—the nearly 18 million family members in the United States who provide care to older people who need assistance. They are often invisible members of our health care system who receive little preparation, training, or support. They make it possible for older adults to live in their homes, rather than an institutional setting, for as long as possible—which is what 87%.... Read More

                 

    Elder Refugees In Kentucky At Risk for Hunger

    by Rhonda Miller. This article originally appeared on WKU Public Radio. This is part one of a three part series; you can read part one here and read part two here.

    Feeding Kentucky, a nonprofit with a mission to alleviate hunger across the Bluegrass State, reports that food insecurity is a reality for one in 10 residents age 60 and older.

    Elder refugees

    The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

    in Kentucky face an ever higher risk of hunger due to language barriers and lack of transportation.

    On a recent rainy afternoon in Louisville,.... Read More

                 
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