Addressing the Social Determinants of Brain Health

    by Jason Resendez and Stephanie Monroe. This article originally appeared on SaludAmerica!

    In our work with the UsAgainstAlzheimer’s Alzheimer’s Disease Disparities Engagement Network, we are reflecting on the numerous challenges and injustices people of color face when it comes to healthcare in the U.S.

    For example, African Americans and Latinos face a higher risk for some of our country’s most common health problems, including obesity, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, stroke, Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

    To understand and address these disparities, greater attention must be paid to the role of.... Read More

                 

    Sleep Is Crucial to Healthy Aging

    by Kayla Sawyer. This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    It is a common misconception that sleep needs decline with age. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advises that 61-64-year-olds get seven to nine hours, and adults 65 and older get seven to eight hours.

    Unfortunately, as people age they tend to have a harder time falling asleep and more trouble staying asleep. Older people spend more time in the lighter stages of sleep than in deep sleep. They also experience an overall decline in REM sleep and an increase in sleep fragmentation.

    .... Read More
                 

    The Nation’s Largest LGBTQ-Inclusive Affordable Housing for Older Adults

    This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    When applications opened for New York City’s first affordable housing property for LGBTQ older adults recently, 1,000 people eagerly sent theirs in on that first day.

    This underscores a genuine need. Not only is New York City increasingly unaffordable, but LGBTQ older adults run up against pervasive barriers when trying to find a place to live.

    A 2014 report by the Equal Rights Center found that near half of LGBTQ couples applying for senior housing were subjected to discrimination, and a quarter of transgender older adults report housing.... Read More

                 

    Eradicating Elder Abuse is Everyone’s Responsibility

    by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    Are you safe at home?

    Many of us take the answer to that question for granted. After all, our home should be our refuge. It should be a place where we feel safe, secure and surrounded by people we love and trust — especially as we age. For the one in 10 older Americans who suffer elder mistreatment, however, home may simply not be a safe place.

    As we recognize World Elder Abuse.... Read More

                 

    How to Be an LGBTQ Ally

    by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    Chances are, there’s at least one person in your life who identifies within the LGBTQ community — likely more than one. The person might be a family member. Or a neighbor. Or a friend’s child or grandchild.

    Though messaging about, and support of, LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer) people has progressed in recent years, the community still faces hate crimes, employment and housing discrimination, barriers to health care and harmful bias. That’s why allies are so important.

    An “ally” is someone.... Read More

                 

    Honey: A Story of Defeating PTSD

    by Chunxiang Jin. This article originally appeared in the World Journal. To read the original article in Chinese, click here.

    Cheryl “Honey” Dupris has multiple identities. She is a strong woman, a Native American, a paratrooper, and an Iraq war and Afghanistan war veteran who suffers from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    However, Honey is not the typical PTSD sufferer. She embraces the illness, bravely speaks out about her feelings, and works to enjoy every moment in life. If you talk and hang out with her, you would not even realize that she is a victim of PTSD. Instead, you would notice her vivacious laughter and squeals at a party, her unique fist bump with strangers, and.... Read More

                 

    For the First Time, National Report Examines Potential Role of Caregivers in Medical Product Development

    For the first time, a newly-released report, resulting from a one-day summit, “Paving the Path for Family-Centered Design: A National Report on Family Caregiver Roles in Medical Product Development,” explores the vital roles that family caregivers can play in shaping biomedical research and development, regulatory decision-making and healthcare delivery. Specifically, the report begins a dialogue on how to incorporate the critical knowledge of caregivers in developing pharmaceutical products, biotechnology therapies, and medical devices. It presents recommendations for leveraging the enormous – and largely untapped – a reservoir of information and observations of caregivers about the conditions their care.... Read More

                 

    Lost in Translation: Google’s Translation of Palliative Care to ‘Do-Nothing Care’

    by Cynthia X. Pan, MD, FACP, AGSF. This article originally appeared on the GeriPal blog.


    My colleagues often ask me: “Why are Chinese patients so resistant to hospice and palliative care?” “Why are they so unrealistic?” “Don’t they understand that death is part of life?” “Is it true that with Chinese patients you cannot discuss advance directives?”

    As a Chinese speaking geriatrician and palliative care physician practicing in Flushing, NY, I have cared for countless Chinese patients with serious illnesses or at end of life.  Invariably, when Chinese patients or families see me, they ask me if I.... Read More

                 

    Age-Friendly Health Care: Speaking Up About What Matters to You

    by Dr. Terry Fulmer, President, The John A. Hartford Foundation. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    As you get older, your medical care can ripple across every aspect of your life. It might be a prescription that makes you too tired for dinner with the family. You may love bowling, but a hip replacement has kept you off the lanes much longer than you expected. You might feel sad and withdrawn from friends, unsure if it’s depression or because you can’t hear as well anymore.

    In all of these examples, your health care.... Read More

                 

    What Second Chance? The Uncertain Future of Post-Prison Health Care

    by Cassie M. Chew. This article originally appeared in The Crime Report.

    In the months since President Trump signed the First Step Act, the product of a landmark bipartisan effort that many have called one of the most important justice reforms in years, about 500 individuals have been released from federal prison.

    “America is a nation that believes in redemption,” the president boasted at the White House signing ceremony, as he celebrated a law that expands the “good time credits” allowing more federal inmates to apply for early release.

    But for many of those returning citizens, “redemption” may prove a mixed blessing.

    White House Hurdles to Care

    Thanks to White House policies that.... Read More

                 

    A Little Too Late: Some Chinese American Vets to Never Receive WWII Gold Medal

    by Chunxiang Jin. To read the original article in Chinese, please visit the World Journal website.

    Peter Woo would never get the chance to receive the Congressional Gold Medal for his indelible service during World War II.

    He died unexpectedly only six days before President Trump signed the Chinese-American World War II Veteran Congressional Gold Medal Act into law on Dec. 20, 2018. Woo, along with many other Chinese American veterans of World War II, have passed away in the past few years. Now there are less than 100 veterans who might be able to receive this recognition for their service.

    Flying Tiger Squadron

    Woo was born in 1919 to a literary family in Taishan, Guangdong province. He came to the United States as a.... Read More

                 

    Blue Zones, Part 3: How the Oldest People in America’s Blue Zone Make Their Money Last

    by Rich Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    (In 2008, National Geographic writer Dan Buettner published his bestselling book, The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, about the five “longevity pockets” around the world. For this weekly series, Next Avenue Money and Work & Purpose editor Richard Eisenberg, a Gerontological Society of America Journalists in Aging Fellow, takes a different look at the Blue Zones — places where there’s a high concentration of people living past 90 without chronic illnesses. Rather than focusing on the residents’ diets, he reports on.... Read More

                 
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