Beyond Age, Race & Income: Sociodemographic Factors to Track During COVID-19

    by Elana Kieffer. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

    New York City has been the American city hit hardest by the COVID-19 pandemic. Not all New Yorkers are equally at risk; age has been a serious risk factor, and nearly 75% of New Yorkers who have died from COVID-19 were 65 and over. Race and class also influence infection and mortality rates: Black and Latino city residents have died from COVID-19 at twice the rate of White or Asian New Yorkers, and the ZIP codes in the bottom 25%.... Read More

                 

    SEARAC 2020 Census: Voices from the Vietnamese Community

    This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

    Luke Kertcher
    ESL Teacher, Aldine Independent School District
    Houston, TX

    Back in March as part of #StatsinSchools week, SEARAC Census Ambassador (and former intern) Luke Kertcher, an ESL teacher based in Texas, designed a scavenger hunt and trivia activity about the census. “We were able to learn and discuss more about why the census is important, especially for our immigrant and refugee communities,” he said. “I also distributed flyers in my students’ home languages—Spanish and Vietnamese—for their.... Read More

                 

    Education & Action During COVID-19: Caring for LGBT Older People

    This article originally appeared on Medium.

    Older adults in the United States are at increased risk for contracting COVID-19. They are particularly vulnerable without access during the pandemic to the health care resources and social structures that contribute to overall wellness. This is especially true for the 1.1 million LGBTQ people who are ages 65 and older living across the country.

    While LGBT older people are at a greater risk for the virus based on age,.... Read More

                 

    With HIV/AIDS, What Does Successful Aging Look Like?

    by Grace Birnstengel. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    At 62, Hugo Sapién is seriously considering going back to school to earn a master’s degree in theology. In his younger days, this is something he would have never considered — not for lack of interest, but because he didn’t think he’d live long enough to even finish his undergraduate degree.

    “I thought there’s no way I’m going to make it,” Sapién, of San Antonio, says. “I wouldn’t make any long-term plans.”

    This was the mid-80s, when Sapién suspects he acquired HIV (he wasn’t diagnosed until 1995). Treatments for the virus were sprouting up with mixed effectiveness. Death was a real — if.... Read More

                 

    Aging Out Loud: From Generation to Generation

    by Renée Markus Hodin. This article originally appeared on Community Catalyst’s Health Policy Hub blog.

    We want to pay tribute to a leader with whom many Health Policy Hub readers may not be familiar: Nelson Cruikshank. Nelson was a longtime leader in the labor movement who was instrumental in creating two of the most important programs for vulnerable older adults and people with disabilities: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Medicare.

    Born in 1902, Nelson grew up to become a Methodist minister and, later, a union organizer. After a series of jobs in the federal government – including one setting up camps for migrant farm workers, a program later made famous in John Steinbeck’s novel, The Grapes of.... Read More

                 

    Join us! Celebrate Pride In Place

    This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

    SAGE is proud to introduce #PrideInPlace, our virtual Pride campaign for 2020. Pride in Place is a way to celebrate Pride and the 50th anniversary of our country’s first Pride March wherever you are, whether it’s a physical location, your place in life, your place in the community, or your place in the history of the movement. This is an affirmation – no matter where you are or what is going on in the world, pride is a state of mind, and will continue to flourish against all odds.

    Resources:

    View our Pride in Place social media.... Read More
                 

    COVID-19 symptom monitoring program from Duke University

    This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

    Action is needed to help people of color to receive the care we need if we have COVID-19. Too many reports say that we are dying at disproportionately higher rates.

    We know that structural inequality, bias, and racism did not disappear overnight. We cannot merely demand the collection of data. This is not enough.

    While collecting data from us in the community, we need help if we fall sick. We need to know if we need to seek medical attention. And, public health officials in our communities need information on emerging hotspots rapidly, not one year.... Read More

                 

    Lifeline Has Additional Support For Tribal Lands

    This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    Lifeline consumers can receive up to $25 per month discount (and up to $100 reduction for first-time connection charges) in addition to the standard Lifeline benefit amount if they live on federally recognized tribal lands.

    Lifeline customers residing on tribal lands are eligible for Link Up. Link Up is a one-time benefit per address; you can request Link Up each time you change your primary residential address. Link Up can reimburse the full cost of initiating service with certain phone/internet companies at your primary.... Read More

                 

    Seniors Living on the Street With a Bleak Future

    by Agustin Durán. To read the original Spanish-language article in La Opinión, click here. (Para leer este artículo en español, haga clic aquí.)

    The first thing Gerado recommends to young people so that they do not end up on the street is to learn a trade with which they can maintain themselves their whole life. He did not have one and at 55, when he lost his job, nobody wanted to hire him.

    Today, at 65 years of age, he lives on tips from an East Los Angeles supermarket and bounces around from shelter to shelter to have one less expense.

    Gerado is originally from Los Reyes, Michoacán, where his wife and son currently.... Read More

                 
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