How to care for someone with COVID-19 at home

    This article originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

    As the COVID-19 pandemic continues and cases increase, many people are continuing their coronavirus treatment and recovery at home. Whether the person has symptoms or has been diagnosed with COVID-19, certain measures need to be taken to protect the health and wellbeing of patients and those living in the households with COVID-19 positive patients.

    Below are recommendations for actions you can take at home:

    Caregiving at home:

    Caregivers and people who are infected with COVID-19 should wear masks when they are in the same.... Read More
                 

    Full Circle

    By Mandy Diec. This article originally appeared on the SEARAC blog.

    In 1991, my family and I arrived in California as part of the final wave of refugees resettling in the United States after the Vietnam War. My dad has retold this story many times. I loved these stories as a child because the focus was always on the lighter, amusing parts of the story, like when my parents tossed away a diaper they were given on the plane because they had no idea what it was, rather than the heavier reality of leaving the traumas of war and persecution* and beginning the fear and anxiety of acculturating and assimilating in this new, adopted country.

    We.... Read More

                 

    Hurt on the Job: Older Latino Workers in Oklahoma

    By Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell for Telemundo Oklahoma (May 22, 2020). See this video news report in Spanish with English subtitles.

    Certain jobs have a higher chance of injury than others. If an injury occurs on the job it can change the affected person’s life forever and that’s why it’s important to have a safety plan for difficult times. Accidents happen even in the safest of jobs. That’s why rules and regulations are set in place.

    “Health officials are always reminding us how to conduct ourselves in the safest way along with reminding us to wear our protective equipment,”.... Read More

                 

    A Pandemic Is Not the Time to Sever the Ties That Bind Generations

    by Donna Butts. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    (Across caregiving and community, business and intergenerational attitudes, the pandemic and how we respond to it could change us forever. Next Avenue turned to some of our Influencers in Aging, a diverse group of thought leaders, for their insights, counsel and opinions of what could lie ahead — if we choose. This article, by a 2015 Next Avenue Influencer in Aging, originally appeared on Medium.com.)

    It’s too early to know if social isolation or the coronavirus (COVID-19).... Read More

                 

    Meet the faces behind SAGE’s HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition

    This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

    On June 12, SAGE officially announced the formation of the new HIV & Aging Policy Action Coalition (HAPAC). Generously funded by Gilead’s HIV Aging Positively Initiative, the coalition aims to build a dynamic, diverse, and long-term survivor driven group. HAPAC’s mission is focused on publicly acknowledging, drawing much-needed attention to, and meeting the needs of long-term survivors and LGBT older people living with HIV. This coalition is driven by long-term survivors working alongside representatives from some of our country’s leading HIV and aging advocacy organizations and community and grassroots-based organizations. Below, meet the members of the coalition and learn more about their work:

    TEZ.... Read More

                 

    Planning for the Future of Hispanic Elders

    By Cecilia Hernandez-Cromwell for Telemundo Oklahoma (May 22, 2020). See this video news report in Spanish with English subtitles.

    Taking care of loved ones can be very draining. Looking out for the ones you love should be a natural process, but in Hispanic culture it is basically mandatory. Plans need to be set with loved ones for when they can no longer look out for themselves. One of the most difficult decisions a person can make is to leave everything they have built behind to take care of relatives who can no longer take care of themselves.

    .... Read More
                 

    Virtual Classes for Older Adults: Here to Stay

    by Susan Stiles, PhD. This article originally appeared on the NCOA blog.

    “I look forward to the calls each week.”

    This comment was typical of the feedback that Peggy Schmidt received when she offered a virtual Aging Mastery “book club” to her rural constituents in Wisconsin. As the Caregiver/Health Promotion Specialist for the Aging & Disability Resource Center there, she transformed in-person classes to virtual ones, but after a survey revealed a deep digital divide in her community, she conducted classes via telephone. These weekly sessions provided one means for her and.... Read More

                 

    Writing the Poignant New York Times COVID-19 Obituaries

    By Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    You can learn in The New York Times how many humans have died from the coronavirus from its Tracking the Coronavirus graphic (472,125 as of June 23, 2020). But to understand the humanity, you need to read The Times’ Those We’ve Lost obituary series.

    Dan Wakin, who edits Those We’ve Lost, said he wants its readers to get a sense “of the scope of the pandemic; that it spares no one. It doesn’t matter how much money you have, how educated you are, how brilliant a doctor you are. You can die.”

    Beyond that, Wakin said, he also hopes readers will “come away.... Read More

                 

    SCOTUS Decision Sparks Community to Continue the Fight

    By Randi Robertson. This article originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

    Overjoyed doesn’t really cover it! On June 15, 2020, the Supreme Court of the United States of America affirmed that I, a retired USAF Officer/Pilot who voluntarily served 22 years to protect and defend the constitution, who happens to be transgender, is actually protected from work place discrimination under Title VII of the civil rights act.

    The past several years have been like walking through a dark tunnel as the current White House and Administration has systematically tried to erase transgender people like myself. The most recent actions to erase protections for LGBTQI people in the arena of healthcare treatment, by changing Affordable Care Act.... Read More

                 

    NICOA Partner Spotlight: Salvation Army Red Shield Kitchen

    This article originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    NICOA’s Senior Community Services Employment Program (SCSEP) partners with The Salvation Army Red Shield Kitchen to train program participants as cooks and kitchen assistants.

    During the process, participants learn the state guidelines for properly handling food, how to properly clean and sanitize, as well as train for food handlers license. The program was recently recognized in an article by Senior News & Living OK.

    Check out our interview with former SCSEP participant and current Salvation Army Red Shield.... Read More

                 

    Maximize Your Virtual Health Care Visit

    This article originally appeared on Black Health Matters.

    Social distancing recommendations have forced us to change the way health care is being delivered. Virtual health care visits allow providers to see patients when coming into the clinic isn’t an option. They help us minimize disease spread, eliminate unnecessary hospital visits and free up resources so people in critical need can be better served.

    Virtual health care isn’t new. Telemedicine appointments have been used for years by physicians for post-operative and follow-up appointments, but many of us haven’t taken part in video-based visits. So it stands to reason that some of us might be nervous the first time we have a telehealth visit, especially.... Read More

                 

    SEARAC Launches Solidarity Resource Hub in Support of the Movement for Black Lives and SEAA leaders

    This article originally appeared on the SEARAC website.


    On June 19, 1865, more than 250,000 African Americans enslaved in Texas were notified of their freedom, two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. One hundred fifty five years later, on the anniversary of what we now celebrate as Juneteenth, SEARAC stands in solidarity with the Black community in honoring this important history and to fight in defense of Black lives.

    Inspired by the important work Southeast Asian American, Asian American, and Pacific Islander leaders are.... Read More

                 
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