New Medicare Cards are Coming Soon

    by Seema Verma, CMS Administrator. This post originally appeared on the CMS blog.
    To read this article in Spanish, click here.


    When you get your new Medicare card in the mail, keep it safe! Guard your card to prevent fraud.

    As you may have heard, or perhaps you’ve seen a recent TV commercial, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services will soon be issuing every Medicare beneficiary a new Medicare Card, without Social Security Numbers, to prevent fraud, fight identity theft, and keep taxpayer dollars safe, and to help ensure that we always put the needs of patients first.

    It’s unfortunate that criminals are increasingly targeting people age 65 or.... Read More

                 

    Stop the Inhumane Prison Transfer of Manuel Syphanh Khiobouakham

    by Phat McGlothlin. This post originally appeared on the Asian Prisoner Support Committee.

    Stop the inhumane prison transfer of my son.

    My name is Phat McGlothlin. I am the mother of Manuel Syphanh Khiobouakham, who is currently serving a 7-year state prison sentence.

    About two months ago, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) transferred my son from Vacaville, California to Eloy, Arizona — ripping apart my family’s connection to my son.

    I was born in a refugee camp in Thailand during the aftermath of the American War in Vietnam and the Secret War in Laos. During the Secret War, Laos was bombed more heavily than any other country in history: nearly one ton of bombs were.... Read More

                 

    Are you managing multiple chronic health conditions? Medicare can help!

    Managing your health can be challenging, especially if you have two or more chronic conditions or illnesses. The Connected Care campaign offers information to help you take advantage of new Medicare services that pay for comprehensive care management particularly needed by patients dealing with multiple chronic conditions. If you have Medicare and live with two or more chronic conditions, you may be eligible for chronic care management (CCM) services to help you maximize your health and spend more time with your loved ones.

    What does CCM mean for you?

    CCM means having a continuous relationship with a.... Read More
                 

    Older Adults & the ACA Health Insurance Marketplace: What’s at Stake for 2018

    by Natalie Kean. This post originally appeared on the Justice in Aging blog.

    Among its many achievements, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has made great strides in covering more older adults who previously had no access to health care. Before the ACA, many low-income older adults who did not have employer-based coverage had no affordable coverage options to address their growing health care needs prior to becoming eligible for Medicare. Insurance companies were allowed to effectively price lower-income older adults out of the individual market or deny them coverage altogether based on pre-existing conditions. These insurance practices posed.... Read More

                 

    Aging New York Immigrants Confront Shortage of Culturally Appropriate Services

    by Ramón Cuauhtémoc Taylor. This article was originally published by Voice Of America News.

    On a fluorescent-lit stage at Desi Senior Center, an instructor leads a group of mostly Muslim Bangladeshi immigrants, ages 60 and older, in a session of balance and core exercises.

    Aided by PowerPoint slides, he instructs them to squat in Bengali, then proceeds to count to ten in English. The women, dressed in colorful dupattas and hijabs, stand on the right; men, wearing Tupi prayer caps, on the left. They place their hands on their hips. Some close their eyes.

    For five hours a day, three days a week in the basement of Queens, New York’s Jamaica Muslim Center, more than 150 aging.... Read More

                 

    Your Money, Your Goals – Overcoming Barriers Through Financial Empowerment

    by Nicole Van Nelson. This post originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    Finances can be overwhelming for many people, and a variety of factors can increase financial challenges, especially for Elders.

    Economic Barriers

    Economic barriers are a significant challenge for many who already feel that finances are overwhelming, and these barriers in turn can create additional challenges, often related to health.

    Low-income households, especially people that live and work in areas where there is a lack of employment or educational resources (which disproportionately include racial and ethnic minorities), often experience a lack of access to healthy lifestyle options..... Read More

                 

    Seniors Dance for Health, Life—and to Beat the Blues

    by Jacqueline García. This article originally appeared on New America Media.

    When a group of elderly women dance, their eyes focus on their hands, their movements and their fans.

    Their dresses are colorful, flowers adorn their hair, and their shoes have heels, not too high but elegant.

    “Dancing is art and is life,” said Ana Miranda, age 65, after a presentation at the World Conference on Geriatrics and Gerontology in San Francisco in late July. The once-in-four-years conference attracted 6,000 experts in aging from 75 countries.

    Miranda along with the other women belong to the San Francisco Mission Neighborhood Center (MNC) Healthy Aging program. She has attended the senior center for more than five years and said the.... Read More

                 

    Aging as LGBT: Two Stories

    by Heron Greenesmith. This post originally appeared on the Justice in Aging blog.

    Tina and Jackie were born in the same town in 1947. Despite similar beginnings, their lives take very different turns. In 1967, Tina meets Frank. And Jackie meets Frances. As a same-sex couple, Jackie and Frances couldn’t marry, were denied spousal benefits, and experienced a lifetime of discrimination and lost wages. Fast forward to today, and Jackie, like so many other older adults, struggles with financial insecurity, social isolation, and overall lack of health and well-being, simply because they are lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT).

    Unfortunately, Jackie’s story.... Read More

                 

    Challenges Loom for Growing Elderly Filipino American Population

    by Neil Gonzalez. This article originally appeared on New America Media.

    Betty de Guzman takes her ailments in stride.

    The gracefully dressed, pixie-haired 78-year-old has been a breast-cancer survivor the past 16 years. “When I got diagnosed, I said so be it,” she said. “But I’m thankful to God for saving my life.”

    She has also been battling diabetes. “I control my food and take my medicine,” she said while hanging out with friends at the Pilipino Senior Resource Center in San Francisco. “I eat a small amount of rice and more protein, vegetables and fruits.”

    Health and other concerns pertaining to older Filipino Americans, such as de Guzman, are expected only to heighten as this.... Read More

                 

    ACA Repeal Would Send Native American Uninsured Rate Soaring

    by Jim McLean

    The number of Native Americans without health insurance would increase sharply if Republicans in Congress succeed in repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, according to a new report.

    The report, from the left-leaning Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, says that proposed cuts to Medicaid and to the subsidies that reduce out-of-pockets costs for low-income individuals purchasing private insurance in the ACA marketplace would jeopardize the coverage of more than 300,000 Native Americans and Alaska Natives.

    The uninsured rate among Native Americans would climb by 27.4 percent in Kansas and 36.2 percent in Missouri, according to the report. Kansas is home to approximately 60,000 people who self-identify as either.... Read More

                 

    Extreme Heat

    by Nicole Van Nelson, National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA). This post originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

    It is officially summer time, and with summer comes hot weather. Unfortunately, sometimes the weather gets too hot and becomes extreme heat, which can cause heat-related illnesses. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) note that “around 618 people in the United States are killed by extreme heat every year” even though heat-related deaths and illness are preventable.

    Heat-related illnesses happen when the body is not able to properly cool itself, and in extreme heat evaporation is slowed so your body must work extra hard to maintain a normal.... Read More

                 

    Black, Gray and Gay: The Perils of Aging LGBTQ People of Color

    by Chandra Thomas Whitfield. This article originally appeared on NBCNews.com.

    Cecelia Hayden Smith, 72, knows exactly how she wants to live out the remainder of her golden years: lounging lazily on the porch of a cozy house tucked along a quiet, treelined street in Washington, D.C.

    She’d greet her partner each morning with a homemade country breakfast, and their afternoons and evenings would be filled with lively games of Spades and Bid Whist with a dozen or so housemates — all fellow LGBTQ elders.

    “I’ve already picked out my rocking chair,” the retired substance abuse counselor quipped. “Just call me ‘Mama C,’ and make sure my room is in the front, so I can always see.... Read More

                 
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