What we owe to one another

    by SAGE Communications

    In Fall 2019, the SAGE team jetted to Los Angeles and Miami to produce our national LGBT Speed Mentoring program. Just like ‘speed dating,’ a speed mentoring includes facilitated one-on-one conversations and time to mingle. Cue cards prompt conversations about participants’ current projects, goals, and skills in a fun atmosphere with peppy music and tasty food and drinks.

    Within two hours, some are exchanging Instagram handles, and others are asking “can you teach me Instagram?” And this is exactly the crux of mentorship: building and maintaining a relationship based on.... Read More

                 

    The 2020 Census Is Vital for American Indians and Alaska Natives

    By Kayla Sawyer, Technical Communications Analyst, National Indian Council on Aging (NICOA)

    American Indians and Alaska Natives are the ethnic group with the highest undercount of any defined by the Census Bureau. Approximately 4.9 percent of American Indians and Alaska Natives were undercounted by the 2010 Census. The reasons for this undercount are varied, but one key reason is that 26 percent of American Indians live in hard-to-count census tracts. More than 80 percent of reservation lands are ranked among the country’s hardest-to-count areas. The U.S. Census Bureau is working with organizations.... Read More

                 

    OPINION: A Call to Older Black Men: It’s Time to Fight for Youth

    By Raymond A. Jetson. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    Just a few weeks ago, 24 African-American teenage boys from a local high school in my Baton Rouge, La. community were recommended for suspension. Their crime: participating in a “fight club.” They were not involved in street fights, nor was there any intent to harm anyone. They were simply donning boxing gloves and boxing in locker rooms and restrooms after school.

    These young men are now being held accountable for decisions that were made without the benefit of wise counsel. Where were the African-American.... Read More

                 

    New Report Showcases the Nation’s Leading Gen2Gen Cities

    by Corita Brown. This article originally appeared on Encore.org.

    Encore.org releases #Gen2Gen Cities, a guide to intergenerational strategies for public sector innovators seeking solutions to community challenges.

    Across the country, innovative city and county leaders see an aging population as an opportunity for intergenerational strategies that help meet multiple challenges with a single intervention. Here are a few examples:

    In New York City, nonprofit and city leaders launched an effort to pair youth living in homeless shelters with low-income older adults who have an extra room. The goal: to help stabilize two of.... Read More
                 

    The Double Whammy for Older, Low-Wage Workers With Chronic Conditions

    by Richard Eisenberg. This article originally appeared on Next Avenue.

    Sixty percent of Americans have at least one chronic disease, such as heart disease or diabetes, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Chronic diseases are even more common among older, low-income adults and minorities. But when Kendra Jason, a sociology professor at University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studied workplace supports for older, low-income black workers with chronic conditions, she found some serious problems.

    Jason, who specializes in issues of work and inequality, interviewed 10 female and five male black workers at an urban university in the Southeast who were 50 and older, had two or more chronic conditions and earned.... Read More

                 

    Bridging generations, Cherry Creek students act as volunteer “geek squad” for retirement community

    by Meg Wingerter (mwingerter@denverpost.com). This article originally appeared on The Denver Post.

    Every Saturday, a sort of “geek squad” sets up shop at a Centennial retirement community to help residents stream, surf and connect.

    Unlike professional troubleshooters, however, the members of this tech-support team are supposed to linger to catch up on whatever happened during the week, and they know their repeat customers’ names and stories.

    Zachary Wang and Simar Chadha, both seniors at Cherry Creek High School, started Generation Tech in December 2018, after Wang saw a need while volunteering with an adult day program. More than 50 students volunteer on Saturdays at Holly Creek Living, teaching residents to use their devices and hopefully.... Read More

                 

    NAPCA 40 for 40 Spotlight: Cecilia Wu

    The National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) was founded 40 years ago on November 1, 1979 to address the divide between AAPI elderly and the services they were entitled to. In 40 years, NAPCA has directly served tens of thousands of AAPI elders and indirectly provided assistance to approximately 100,000 more.

    To celebrate this milestone, NAPCA is releasing 40 stories of their staff, constituents, and partners to celebrate the impact that NAPCA has had on AAPI older adults across the country. This week, we highlight Cecilia Wu, a participant of NAPCA’s Senior Community Service Employment Program (SCSEP). For more stories, visit https://www.napca.org/40-for-40/.

    Cecilia Wu, formerly lived in Japan and Taiwan, shares her.... Read More

                 

    Innovation and Hope: A Tale of Two Studies

    by Dr. Marcy Adelman. This article originally appeared in the San Francisco Bay Times.

    In November of 2018, the San Francisco Department of Aging and Adult Services (DAAS) released its study, LGBTQ Participation Equity Analysis, which reported what can only be described as profoundly disturbing results.

    Despite all the progress that has been accomplished by local LGBTQ senior advocates, the successful implementation of most of the LGBT Aging Policy Task Force’s programs recommendations and a decade and a half of city-supported LGBTQ aging cultural competency training for senior care providers, LGBTQ seniors remain one of the most underserved of the city’s diverse older adult populations. As unsettling as the results of this.... Read More

                 

    What’s Behind My Mother’s Obsession With Food?

    by Jaya Padmanabhan. This article originally appeared in India Currents.

    “What did you eat today?” my mother, Sarada, begins her phone conversation with my twenty-three-year-old daughter in New York. When my daughter explains that she made rasam and sautéed cauliflower over the weekend, Sarada’s face lights up. Later she tells me she’s happy that all her grandchildren love rasam, a staple broth from the south of India.

    Eighty-six-year-old Sarada immigrated to America in her 70s, and finds equanimity performing activities and engaging in conversations that hinge around food. When she meets people she doesn’t know, she connects through food conversations, often recalling.... Read More

                 

    Diverse Elders Coalition receives $1,199,763 in renewed funding from The John A. Hartford Foundation to support diverse family caregivers

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    December 23, 2019

    Contact: Jenna McDavid, National Director
    646-653-5015 / jmcdavid@diverseelders.org

    New York, NY – The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) has been approved for a two-year, $1,199,763 grant from The John A. Hartford Foundation to implement the programs and solutions the coalition has developed to support diverse family caregivers. This grant builds off the DEC’s previous planning grant, awarded by The John A. Hartford Foundation in 2018, to identify and address the unique needs of family caregivers in racially and ethnically diverse communities, American Indian and Alaska Native communities, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and/or transgender (LGBT) communities. Through the planning grant, the DEC has been able to.... Read More

                 

    Long-Term Care Equality Index proceeds to next phase

    by Lois A. Bowers. This article originally appeared on McKnight’s Senior Living.

    It was mid-April when I first told you about the launch of a new nationwide tool by elder advocacy group SAGE and the Human Rights Campaign Foundation to assess how well independent living, assisted living, memory care and continuing care retirement communities, as well as skilled nursing and hospice facilities, are treating residents who are lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender or queer.

    About eight months later, the voluntary Long-Term Care Equality Index, or LEI, now has 47 national, statewide, regional and local aging, senior services or LGBTQ membership or advocacy organizations that have endorsed the index and.... Read More

                 

    Supporting Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) as they Age

    Dear Colleague,

    Resources for Integrated Care (RIC) invites you to attend an upcoming webinar. This webinar offers Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Continuing Education (CE) credit at no cost to participants.

    Supporting Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) as they Age

    Date: December 18, 2019
    Time: 12:30 PM – 1:45 PM EST

    Click here to register

    Nationally, the number of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) over the age of 60 is steadily increasing and by 2030, the number of adults with I/DD aged 60 and older.... Read More

                 
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