Sexuality and Sexual Health Among Older Adults

by Nicolás Peña, National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

According to the U.S. Census Bureau (2016), it is expected that by the year 2033 the population of older adults will outnumber people younger than 18 in the United States. With the life expectancy of older adults increasing, we must continue educating and informing this population on maintaining a healthy quality of life. Many older adults continue to be independent, expressing their basic needs, and engaging in and enjoying sexual relationships.

Aging is a natural process of life, and it is normal for the body to go through physiological and emotional changes, such as cognitive loss, and even higher vulnerability.... Read More

             

Breaking stigmas, creating awareness, and increasing age-sensitive education are three key elements to improve the lives Alzheimer’s patients and their caregivers

This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) continues its work by looking for strategies that amplify the voices of thousands of families facing Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia, so their specific needs can be included in the decision-making process across public health.

Latinos face a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias because they are not only living longer (2.5 years longer than whites and 8 years longer than blacks), but they also face severe health disparities, including high levels of hunger, higher rates of type 2 diabetes incidence and complication rates, and lack of access to health insurance.

Around 18% of Hispanic.... Read More

             

Hispanic Family Caregiving: Proceedings From a Thought Leaders Roundtable

This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog.

On February 14, 2017, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) hosted a Caregiving Thought Leaders Roundtable in Washington, DC. The roundtable focused on identifying the education and training needed to support Hispanic caregivers. The discussion was based on a new study released by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine (NASEM) focusing on Family Caregiving for Older Adults. The information gathered from the convening will inform NHCOA’s national strategy on family caregiving and create awareness on caregiving among Hispanics.

.... Read More
             

TAKE ACTION: Tell the Office of Budget and Management that Diverse Elders Need Disaggregated Data!

Did you know? Federal agencies (like those that administer education, housing, and employment programs, just to name a few) are NOT required to count detailed data for diverse communities. Instead of asking whether an elder identifies as “Cambodian,” “Vietnamese,” or “Marshallese,” they simply ask whether a person is “Asian.” People who are Puerto Rican, Mexican, or Brazilian are all lumped together as “Latino.” And agencies are not required to ask ANY questions about sexual orientation or gender identity — and efforts are even underway to remove those questions from federal surveys that do ask for that information. This means our communities remain misrepresented, left out of policy and program decisions, and under-funded.

But the Southeast Asia Resource Action Center.... Read More

             

Latino Seniors Have a Rising ‘Hip’ Problem

hips

By Jackie Edwards, Contributing Writer, SaludToday.com. This post originally appeared on SaludToday.

Did you know more than 300,000 people over age 65 are hospitalized for hip fractures every year?

hip fractureHip fractures have steadily declined over the years. But a California study showed that fractures among Latinas doubled since 1983. In Latino men, reported annual incidents have increased by 4.2%.

Nationally, Latinos are at an intermediate risk.... Read More

             

Brain Health & Inequality: Reflections on the Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity

The 2017 Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity brought together a diverse mix of policymakers, thought leaders, social entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and practitioners to address the nation’s widening opportunity gap. Tucked between to-be-expected panels on manufacturing and hunger, was a 15 minute talk by Dr. Sarah Enos Watamura, Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Denver and Director of the Child Health & Development Lab, on the biology of adversity. She opened by posing the question: How could a consideration of biology inform policy and practice solutions for moving families from inequality to opportunity?

Dr. Watamura highlighted research by.... Read More

             

Paid Family Leave: The Struggle Continues!

This post originally appeared on the NHCOA blog. You can also read it in Spanish here.

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Families that don’t benefit from Paid Family Leave in the United States lose over $20 billion annually.

The Caregiving in the U.S. 2015 Report, conducted by AARP and the National Alliance for Caregiving (NAC), found that 34.2 million Americans provided unpaid care for an adult aged 50 or older. Those who are forced to leave their jobs in absence of Family Paid Leave report a loss of at least $300,000 in wages and/or pensions.

For this reason, the.... Read More

             

Every Minute Counts

Every 66 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease; every minute, a family is changed forever. In the coming decades, the number of Latino families impacted by this progressive brain disease will grow dramatically due to an increase in the Latino older adult population and higher rates of of diabetes and heart disease, both risk factors for Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

According to a recent report by the USC Roybal Institute on Aging and the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Network, the number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia could reach 1.1 million by 2030 and cost Latino families as much as $30 billion annually. However, Latinos are less likely to receive an.... Read More

             

What Did the Diverse Elders Coalition Achieve in 2016?

In case you missed the December edition of our Common Threads newsletter, here are some highlights from the Diverse Elders Coalition in 2016! Subscribe to our newsletter here, and read on to learn more about what we achieved for diverse older adults this year:

It has been a year of ups and downs for our communities and the policies that impact aging within those communities. This edition of our Common Threads newsletter takes a look back at the work the Diverse Elders Coalition did in 2016 and renews our commitment to supporting diverse elders in 2017 and beyond. Read on for more!

Aging in America
In.... Read More

             
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