Connecting Across Generations

by Timothy Wroten of SAGE. This post originally appeared on the SAGE Blog, and you can read about Jay Kallio and other LGBT trailblazers in the Fall 2015 issue of SAGEMatters.

Jay Kallio gained nationwide visibility in 2012 when he shared his story about navigating the healthcare system as a transgender man living with breast cancer. Now in the midst of a new battle, Jay talks about how a younger community of activists has connected him to newfound strength and courage.

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Photo Credit: Rosa Goldensohn/DNAinfo.com

Timothy Wroten: Earlier this year, you were diagnosed with a new condition: terminal lung cancer. Many of us.... Read More

             

The White House Must Do More for Older LGBT Cancer Survivors

headshotThis blog was written by Liz Margolies, LCSW, Executive Director of the National LGBT Cancer Network, and originally appeared on the Huffington Post.

The single biggest risk factor for developing cancer is age and older LGBTQ people are more likely to be living alone when cancer strikes, without either a partner or children for support. And while we might wish that a lifetime of family rejection would be reversed upon hearing of a cancer diagnosis, sadly that is not always the case.

So who is taking care of our community’s older cancer survivors?.... Read More

             

Raising Awareness and Eliminating Health Disparities for National Minority Cancer Awareness Week

When I’ve given trainings to healthcare and social services providers about cancer in the LGBTQ communities, I always find it interesting to ask the audience, “Does it matter who a breast lump spent Valentine’s Day with?”  Or, “Does it matter what country the lump’s grandparents were born in?”  Most participants say, overwhelmingly, no, a lump is a lump is a lump: we should treat patients the same irrespective of their racial and ethnic backgrounds or their sexual orientation.  But as we’ve learned this National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, cancer affects different populations differently, and minority groups in the United States continue to bear a greater cancer burden.

Much of this difference is due to factors like poverty and lack.... Read More

             

Support Groups for Survivors: Commemorating National Minority Cancer Awareness Week

headshotThis post was written by Liz Margolies, LCSW, Executive Director of the National LGBT Cancer Network.

In 2013, the National LGBT Cancer Network and LGBT HealthLink surveyed over 300 LGBTQ-identified cancer survivors and found that, overwhelmingly, our communities needed LGBTQ-targeted support.  Mainstream, “straight-identified” cancer support groups too often left our people’s cancer experiences shut out of the dialogue.  LGBTQ survivors also told us that doctors were not open enough to our needs and sometimes were overtly hostile.  Cancer support groups by and for LGBTQ members were the number one request made by survivors who participated in.... Read More

             

Women and HIV/AIDS: What about Older Adults, Women of Color, and Cancer?

March 10, 2014 is National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day (NWGHAAD). NWGHAAD is a nationwide effort to help women and girls take action to protect themselves and their partners from HIV – through prevention, testing and treatment. The HIV epidemic is rapidly aging with 17% of new HIV diagnoses in the U.S. occurring in those 50 and older. By 2015 the CDC expects half of the HIV infected population to be over 50. Older Americans are more likely than younger Americans to be diagnosed with HIV at a later stage in the disease. This can lead to poorer diagnoses and shorter HIV to AIDS intervals. And with HIV and age, comes cancer.

Statistics – An.... Read More