Fighting for Our Lives – Again!

by Hank Trout. Hank is a 63-year-old gay writer and a 27-year long-term survivor of HIV/AIDS. He has lived in San Francisco since 1980, for the last 12 years with his fiancé Rick. Since January 2016 he has been a Contributing Writer and Columnist for A&U: America’s AIDS Magazine, contributing features, book and art reviews, and a bi-monthly column “For the Long Run,” in which he addresses the issues faced by surviving members of the AIDS Generation. You can read more of Hank’s writing at http://www.hanktrout.wrestlerswob.com.

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Recently, I marched with thousands of.... Read More

             

Brain Health & Inequality: Reflections on the Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity

The 2017 Aspen Summit on Inequality & Opportunity brought together a diverse mix of policymakers, thought leaders, social entrepreneurs, philanthropists, and practitioners to address the nation’s widening opportunity gap. Tucked between to-be-expected panels on manufacturing and hunger, was a 15 minute talk by Dr. Sarah Enos Watamura, Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Denver and Director of the Child Health & Development Lab, on the biology of adversity. She opened by posing the question: How could a consideration of biology inform policy and practice solutions for moving families from inequality to opportunity?

Dr. Watamura highlighted research by.... Read More

             

NICOA Points to American Indian/Alaska Health Disparities during National Minority Health Month

This post originally appeared on the NICOA blog.

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American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Elders have long experienced disparities in health and healthcare. A health disparity is a difference in health outcomes from different groups within the population.

Historically, AI/AN communities have had limited access to quality healthcare. One outcome of treaties between AI/AN communities and the federal government is that all federal recognized tribes have a right to healthcare services. The Indian Health Service (IHS)* was created to meet this federal commitment.

Although there are 567 federally recognized tribes to date, there are many more tribes still seeking federal recognition. Therefore, some.... Read More

             

Ending the Disparate Impact of Alzheimer’s Disease on African Americans

monroe-233x300by Stephanie Johnson Monroe, Director of the African American Network Against Alzheimer’s. This article originally appeared on the LEAD Coalition website. The LEAD Coalition is a diverse and growing national coalition of more than 90 member organizations committed to overcoming Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. To learn more, click here.

African Americans experiencing health disparities is not new. In fact, according to former Surgeon General of the United States and Honorary Chair of the African American Network Against Alzheimer’s, Dr. David Satcher, race based health disparities in the United States are both “pervasive and persistent,”.... Read More

             

Leaning On Each Other: A Story and Call to Action from a Former Case Manager

pvv-headshotby Preston Van Vliet, National Campaign Organizer of the LGBTQ Work-Family Project, a joint initiative with A Better Balance and Family Values @ Work. You can reach him at LGBTQorganizing@gmail.com.

“How’s that jade plant doing?” Joe* asked me as we sat down at his kitchen table for our weekly visit. “You said you put it in a westward facing window, right? It should be getting way more light than mine do.” He gestured toward his patio door where cactuses, orchids, jade plants, and an avocado plant were growing on a bench he.... Read More

             

“These Seniors are Survivors:” Serving Cambodian Elders in Chicago

This week, Southeast Asia Resource Action Center (SEARAC) Executive Director Quyen Dinh travels to Chicago to talk about the needs of Southeast Asian American refugee elders with the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) at the American Society on Aging conference. The DEC is the only national coalition dedicated to raising awareness about the unique needs of LGBT elders, American Indian/Alaska Native elders, immigrant elders, and elders of color.

The seniors program of the Chicago-area Cambodian Association of Illinois (CAI) demonstrates that while many of the needs of Southeast Asian American elders are similar to those of other diverse seniors, they also have very specific needs: culturally, linguistically, and as survivors of.... Read More

             

Q&A About the ACA for Diverse Elders

With the confirmation of Tom Price as Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), diverse elders may have more questions than ever about the future of the Affordable Care Act. The Diverse Elders Coalition will make protecting healthcare access a priority in the coming months, and as we learn more about the fate of the ACA, we will communicate that on our blog and social media.

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In the meantime, here are some questions and answers about the Affordable Care Act and where things stand right now. If you have additional questions, please reach out to the health navigators.... Read More

             

The Untold Story: Grandma’s Long Years Of Caregiving

by Alani Jamile. This article originally appeared in Honolulu Civil Beat.

Grandma Jamile has always been a tough cookie.

From her rough childhood to experiencing a heartbreaking divorce, she has been through it all and never let anything get to her. She found ways to pick herself up in the worst situations and kept moving forward.

I am her first grandchild, which meant I was the one who spent the most time with her out of the six grandchildren she has. As I grew up, she would tell me stories in greater detail about her life. I knew about her growing up an only child with an alcoholic father, her mother abandoning her for a few years and.... Read More

             

Set a Goal, Make Time, Be Determined, and Change Your Life for Good

Health-related goals are indeed popular New Year’s resolutions. Most of us make a resolution to lose weight and exercise more. However, for many of us, the path to good health is not an easy one. Procrastination, family obligations, work demands, or a lack of time are only a few culprits that can hinder the most well-intended resolution.

Nonetheless, America is getting heavier. Despite more than a decade of public awareness campaigns and other efforts to get people to watch their weight, the obesity rates for racial and ethnic minority populations is steadily rising, with women taking the lead. Louisiana, West Virginia, Mississippi, and Alabama have the highest adult obesity rates — over 35 percent. When it comes to African American.... Read More

             

What the Repeal of the Affordable Care Act Means for My Wife and Me

We’ve all seen the pictures of the rich, powerful white men signing the repeal of Obamacare, despite the fact that most people are happy with their healthcare and no one seems to have a plan for what comes next.

For my wife, Mala, and me, this decision and the ensuing uncertainty is literally a matter of life or death. We’re middle-aged, self-employed elder caregivers. We’re not alone. Repealing the ACA puts people like us in a hopeless situation. As caregivers, we can’t take the full-time jobs that provide health care (even supposing they’d hire us so easily). But as self-employed people, we need access to affordable healthcare, or else we are one minor emergency away from.... Read More

             
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