The Untold Story: Grandma’s Long Years Of Caregiving

by Alani Jamile. This article originally appeared in Honolulu Civil Beat.

Grandma Jamile has always been a tough cookie.

From her rough childhood to experiencing a heartbreaking divorce, she has been through it all and never let anything get to her. She found ways to pick herself up in the worst situations and kept moving forward.

I am her first grandchild, which meant I was the one who spent the most time with her out of the six grandchildren she has. As I grew up, she would tell me stories in greater detail about her life. I knew about her growing up an only child with an alcoholic father, her mother abandoning her for a few years and.... Read More

             

Set a Goal, Make Time, Be Determined, and Change Your Life for Good

Health-related goals are indeed popular New Year’s resolutions. Most of us make a resolution to lose weight and exercise more. However, for many of us, the path to good health is not an easy one. Procrastination, family obligations, work demands, or a lack of time are only a few culprits that can hinder the most well-intended resolution.

Nonetheless, America is getting heavier. Despite more than a decade of public awareness campaigns and other efforts to get people to watch their weight, the obesity rates for racial and ethnic minority populations is steadily rising, with women taking the lead. Louisiana, West Virginia, Mississippi, and Alabama have the highest adult obesity rates — over 35 percent. When it comes to African American.... Read More

             

What the Repeal of the Affordable Care Act Means for My Wife and Me

We’ve all seen the pictures of the rich, powerful white men signing the repeal of Obamacare, despite the fact that most people are happy with their healthcare and no one seems to have a plan for what comes next.

For my wife, Mala, and me, this decision and the ensuing uncertainty is literally a matter of life or death. We’re middle-aged, self-employed elder caregivers. We’re not alone. Repealing the ACA puts people like us in a hopeless situation. As caregivers, we can’t take the full-time jobs that provide health care (even supposing they’d hire us so easily). But as self-employed people, we need access to affordable healthcare, or else we are one minor emergency away from.... Read More

             

Every Minute Counts

Every 66 seconds, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease; every minute, a family is changed forever. In the coming decades, the number of Latino families impacted by this progressive brain disease will grow dramatically due to an increase in the Latino older adult population and higher rates of of diabetes and heart disease, both risk factors for Alzheimer’s and other dementias.

According to a recent report by the USC Roybal Institute on Aging and the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Network, the number of Latinos living with Alzheimer’s or a related dementia could reach 1.1 million by 2030 and cost Latino families as much as $30 billion annually. However, Latinos are less likely to receive an.... Read More

             

Where Bigotry is Denied Entrance—Fighting HIV/AIDS Stigma in Housing

by Pat Lin. This post originally appeared on the SAGE blog.

On World AIDS Day, it’s important to commemorate how far we’ve come since the HIV/AIDS pandemic started. HIV isn’t the death sentence it used to be, but many long-term survivors of HIV continue to pay an emotional, physical and financial toll. In addition to managing the disease, HIV survivors still face stigma. As they get older and the effects of the disease compound the challenges of aging, they become more vulnerable. As the nation’s largest and oldest organization serving LGBT older adults, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) seeks to eradicate the stigma around HIV and to create welcoming spaces for long-term HIV survivors.

.... Read More
             

Telling Our Stories for World AIDS Day 2016

wad2016_cropEach year on December 1st, we join millions of individuals and organizations around the globe in commemorating World AIDS Day. The prevention of HIV/AIDS – as well as the continued care of those living with HIV – has always been a top priority for the Diverse Elders Coalition and the communities we represent.

In 2014, we released our policy brief, “Eight Policy Recommendations for Improving the Health and Wellness of Older Adults with HIV,” recommendations for which we continue to fight and advocate today. In 2015, we created an infographic, Facts and Factors: HIV and Diverse.... Read More

             

U.S. Latinos And Alzheimer’s Disease: A Looming Crisis

This blog originally appeared on the Huffington Post.

by William Vega and Daisy Duarte. William is a Provost Professor and Director, USC Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging at the USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work. Daisy is an advocate for the LatinosAgainstAlzheimer’s Network and an Alzheimer’s caregiver.

NYU clinical professor Yvonne Latty never expected the hardships faced as a caregiver for her mother living with Alzheimer’s. From the 24/7 care to the rising medical bills, the experience has been overwhelming. Her attempts to access a diagnosis and treatment for her mother in the Bronx left her angry, frustrated and confused. A doctor smugly suggested Yvonne “Google” her mother’s condition and devise a plan for her with the help of URLs.

.... Read More
             

Commemorating National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day 2016

logo-national-hiv-aging-awareness-badgeEach year on September 18th, we commemorate National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day, a chance to recognize that HIV/AIDS impacts people of all ages, including adults over 50. In fact, by the year 2020, more than 70% of people living with HIV in the United States will be age 50 or older, and 18% of new HIV diagnoses occur among people over 50. It is important to promote both HIV prevention among older adults as well as support the health and social needs of those who are living with the disease.

The Diverse Elders Coalition has a number of resources available on our website.... Read More

             

Indigenous Foods: A Path to Healthy Living

by Christine Herman. Christine is the NCAREE Technical Communications Manager for the National Indian Council on Aging, Inc. (NICOA).

Healthy eating in the modern world is not always easy. Fast food and prepackaged foods offer inexpensive and easy alternatives to healthier foods or cooking from scratch. Even in remote locations, you can count on finding snacks like burgers, chips, candies, and sodas. But these kinds of foods can be harmful to our health in the long run.

A poor diet can have dramatic impact on the lives of Elders. American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) in particular face a predisposition – a greater likelihood of developing – obesity and diabetes.  Diet and nutrition play a crucial role in the overall.... Read More

             

Shattering Stigma: Tell Your Story for Minority Mental Health Awareness Month

July is National Minority Mental Health Awareness Month, and at the Diverse Elders Coalition, we’re working to shine a spotlight on the unique mental health needs of our elders of color, American Indian/Alaska Native elders, and LGBTQ elders.

mmham

Research by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) shows that mental illness affects one in five American adults, yet nearly two-thirds of people with a diagnosable mental illness do not seek treatment. For American Indian/Alaska Native communities, as many as 28% of adults may be living with a mental illness; LGBTQ adults experience even higher rates of mental illness (40%)..... Read More

             
Page 1 of 3123