AIDS AND AGING: A REALITY THAT DEMANDS OUR ATTENTION

Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of NHCOA

Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of NHCOA

The AID Institute’s 7th annual National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day (NHAAAD) will be observed September 18, 2014 with the theme “Aging is a part of life; HIV doesn’t have to be!” For more information about HIV/AIDS and older Americans or to become involved with the campaign, visit www.NHAAAD.org.

Among diverse communities, the stigma of HIV is a cause of shame, embarrassment, and worse of all, denial and silence. When denial and silence are present, the lack of communication and information lead to myths and misinformation. Worst of all, silence results in increased infections and is inevitably compounded by stigma, which leads to people living with HIV who are undiagnosed and therefore, untreated.

In the U.S. alone, 1 out of 6 persons is unaware s/he is HIV positive. The reality is that older Americans are just at risk of HIV infection as younger age groups are.

[Learn more HIV statistics in the United States]

In fact, adults 55 years and older represented nearly one-fifth of the U.S. population living with HIV in 2010. The CDC estimates that by next year (2015), this number will double, which means that half of the people living with HIV in this country will be 50 years and older. There are several reasons why older Americans who are HIV+ may not be aware of their status:

  • HIV tests aren’t always included as part of the check up routine, and seniors tend to think they don’t know need to ask for one;
  • The signs of HIV/AIDS can be mistaken for the aches and pains of normal aging;
  • Older adults are less likely to discuss their sex lives or drug use with loved ones or a health care provider;
  • Myths and misinformation that lead seniors to believe that they are “too old” to get infected;
  • Lack of targeted public education*.

However, we should not only be concerned with reducing HIV infections among the older adult population.

Medical advances have allowed people with HIV who get treated— and stay in treatment— to lead longer, healthier lives. Yet, the success of these new treatments and the increased longevity of patients have led to new challenges to the proper prevention and care of older Americans living with HIV, especially those who are from diverse communities. There is a lack of research aimed at aging with HIV, as well as few prevention campaigns, clinical guidelines, demonstration projects and training initiatives targeting older adults living with HIV, particularly diverse seniors. While the Affordable Care Act does include provisions to support people living with HIV/AIDS, including older Americans, the public policy landscape is scarce when it comes to seniors and HIV/AIDS.

[Related content: Learn how the ACA is helping older Americans living with HIV.]

Older Americans with HIV are often excluded from major legislation, policy initiatives and programs— from the White House Conference on Aging, to the Older Americans Act and the Ryan White CARE Act, to the Medicaid expansion, and more.

Left unaddressed, generations of older adults with HIV/AIDS will lack the supports they need to age with dignity and in the best health possible. This is why the Diverse Elders Coalition in collaboration with ACRIA (AIDS Community Research Initiative of America) released 8 recommendations that have the potential of dramatically improving the lives of diverse seniors, and all older Americans, living with HIV.

What you can do on National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

* To combat this, NHCOA is a partner of the CDC’s Act Against AIDS Leadership Initiative, which is focused on reducing the incidence of HIV/AIDS among diverse communities. Through culturally and linguistically appropriate, and age sensitive outreach and education, NHCOA conducts HIV outreach and education among Hispanic older adults and families to dissipate the stigma and silence.

Additional Resources

www.cdc.gov/hiv

www.aids.gov

www.hhs.gov/ash/ohaidp

www.aoa.gov/AoARoot/AoA_Programs/HPW/HIV_AIDS

Posted by Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Webinar: Marketplace Outreach for Diverse Populations – Thurs. Sept. 25 at 2pm EDT

cms                    DEC Logo enclosed

When: Thursday, September 25, 2014 at 2:00pm EDT

Webinar Link: https://webinar.cms.hhs.gov/marketplacedp92514/

Call in number: 1-877-267-1577        Meeting ID: 995 471 476

No advanced registration is required.

Speakers:

  • Jeanette Contreras, MPP, Outreach Lead – Partner Relations Group, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)
  • Jonathan Tran, California Policy and Advocacy Manager, Southeast Asia Action Resource Center (SEARAC)
  • Patrick Aitcheson, Interim National Coordinator, Diverse Elders Coalition

Who should attend? Advocates. Policy makers. Older adults. Funders. Anyone interested in learning more about ACA enrollment as we approach the start of year 2, especially lessons learned for enrolling and supporting typically difficult to reach populations such as Southeast Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians & Alaska Natives, and LGBT Americans.

What: Please join CMS and the Diverse Elders Coalition for a webinar that will highlight ACA Marketplace Year 2 enrollment guidance for immigrant families and auto-enrollment; Marketplace outreach resources and campaign materials; and lessons learned for reaching older people of color and LGBT older people.

Background: Year one open enrollment for the Affordable Care Act/ACA/Obamacare ran from October 1, 2013 to March 31, 2014. Over 9 million people obtained health coverage via the Marketplace and another 8 million people obtained Medicaid coverage. As year one open enrollment ended, educational needs continued regarding special enrollment periods, immigrant families, health insurance literacy and how to get the most from this new coverage. Year two open enrollment begins November 15. While year one enrollment brought much needed health coverage to many millions of people, not all communities were reached equally well. Language and cultural issues, lack of health literacy, and limited individualized enrollment support were among the barriers faced by certain communities. Many lessons were learned in year one on how to reach hard to reach populations and these lessons need to be shared and followed in order to boost coverage levels among older adults of color and LGBT older adults. This webinar will discuss the challenges and barriers to reaching Southeast Asian Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians and Alaska Natives, and LGBT Americans and convey the lessons learned and tips that can be applied to boost year two success.

One last push – Getting the Older Americans Act (OAA) reauthorized in 2014

August in Washington, DC usually means Congressional recess, when all Congress members take a break from Washington and return to their districts. Depending on whom you ask, August in DC could either be a peaceful and quiet time or a time to schedule meetings and diligently prepare for Congress’ return post-Labor Day. For the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), it has been the latter. As we enter the last quarter of the year, NHCOA is focusing efforts on scheduling Hill visits to educate Congressional staffers and reiterate how critical it is for Congress to reauthorize the Older Americans Act as they return to Washington from their states and districts this week.

The Older Americans Act (OAA) is one of the most important laws for older adults, and as it nears its 50th Anniversary, it is in need of greater recognition. The programs of the OAA are also extremely important in allowing older adults to age in place, with dignity, and in the best possible health, as it authorizes a wide variety of programs focused on health, nutrition, job training, and caregiver support. The OAA, which expired in 2011, has not been renewed— or reauthorized— since. Each year, the various programs are funded individually through appropriations bills, but this is neither an efficient nor a sustainable method. Reauthorization is urgently needed!

As we’ve written in previous blogs, NHCOA strongly supports a reauthorization of the Older Americans Act—but it must happen before the end of 2014. While a straight reauthorization would be better than none, it would be more effective to have a reauthorization that accounts for the growing size and diversification of the older adult population and one whose needs are ever fluid and changing.

Thus far, there are four bills on record, asking for reauthorization: H.R. 4122 (Rep. Bonamici- Oregon), H.R. 3850 (Rep. Gibson, New York), S. 1562 (Sen. Sanders- Vermont) and S. 1028 (Sen. Sanders). Of these, S. 1562 is the most advanced in the legislative process, having been sent to committee, where it is currently stuck. It is this impasse that has delayed the much-needed reauthorization of the OAA.

Given that it is an election year and a change in the political climate might make it even harder for a committee compromise to be reached, NHCOA and its fellow Diverse Elders Coalition co-founders urge Congress to take action now before all the hard work put forth in the past year is lost and millions of America’s older adults lose access to programs and services which currently allow them to age in place and remain engaged and active members of their communities.

We ask Congress to take into account the millions of baby boomers who cannot wait for another year of political in-fighting and who urgently need these services in their local communities. While we understand that the list of urging and pressing matters awaiting Congress is long, it is important to highlight that OAA is equally as important to those whom it affects most, and through compromise and strong Congressional leadership, this Act can be reauthorized within the few legislative days left.

In the meantime, NHCOA and the DEC will continue to fight for the OAA on behalf of the millions of diverse seniors who rely on the services, programs, and funding this law provides.

Dr. Yanira Cruz is the President and CEO of the National Hispanic Council on Aging. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Related Older Americans Act posts:

Recognizing and caring for our grandparents (National Grandparents Day) with a view towards the 2015 White House Conference on Aging

Sunday, September 7, 2014 is National Grandparents Day. What a great opportunity to recognize those that have given so much love and support! Grandparents Day was established as a national holiday in 1978 as a way to recognize and value the contributions of our nation’s seniors. Our elders have often done much to support our families in economic, emotional and spiritual ways and yet these contributions are often overlooked and unappreciated.

In the years since the establishment of National Grandparents Day, there has been a grandparents boom with the numbers rising from 40 million in 1980 to 65 million in 2011 and an estimated 80 million in 2020. This “Elder Boom” is not a crisis but a blessing. We’re living longer and have the opportunity to spend more time together. The question is how do we live as we age?

Our friends at Caring Across Generations have run a summer long campaign “ThrowbackSummer” to celebrate the culture, memories and relationships that unite us across generations. Their goal is to build a national movement to transform the way we care in this country. And that includes caring for our elders.

Right now, our country has no comprehensive plan to care for our aging parents and grandparents. More broadly, seven in ten of us will need home care at some point in our lives, due to disability or the simple natural process of getting older. And the vast majority of us – 90% – would prefer to stay at home instead of being placed in a facility. But for too many of us, home care is not an option.

Grandparents Day is the perfect time to discuss issues such as long-term care. The process of aging, or losing mobility due to disability, can also be scary and challenging for many people – and therefore something that most people want to avoid thinking about. Our grandparents have done so much for us. SEARAC’s Bao Lor learned about love and courage and hard work from her grandpa, a refugee from Laos. However some grandparents can face a wide range of challenges when performing primary childcare for their grandchildren. Now it is time to consider what we can and should do for them so that they can age with dignity and independence.

Preparations have begun for the 2015 White House Conference on Aging (WHCOA). Occurring every ten years, the WHCOA is an opportunity to look ahead to the issues that will help shape the landscape for older Americans (our grandparents) for the next decade. In late July, Cecilia Munoz, an Assistant to the President and Director of the Domestic Policy Council, outlined possible themes for next year’s WHCOA:

  • Retirement security – Financial security in retirement provides essential peace of mind for older Americans
  • Long-term services and supports – Older Americans prefer to remain independent in the community as they age but need supports such as a caregiving network and well-supported workforce
  • Healthy aging – As medical advances progress, the opportunities for older Americans to maintain their health and vitality should progress as well
  • Protection – Seniors, particularly the oldest, can be vulnerable to financial exploitation, abuse and neglect. Protect seniors from those seeking to take advantage of them

In honor of National Grandparents Day, the Diverse Elders Coalition recognizes and appreciates the many and varied contributions of our nation’s seniors. In the year ahead, we plan to ensure the voices and needs of our diverse communities are fully represented in the 2015 White House Conference on Aging.

Thank You Grandparents!

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy Caring Across Generations

Photo: courtesy NHCOA

Photo: courtesy NHCOA

Patrick Aitcheson is the Interim National Coordinator for the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC). The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Protect your Marketplace health coverage by resolving data inconsistencies by Friday, September 5!

Diana Moschos - pic

Diana Moschos – NHCOA

Over the past several weeks, the Health Insurance Marketplace has been reaching out to consumers who have information on their applications which doesn’t match the data on file. In order to continue staying covered by the Marketplace, these consumers have been contacted by mail, email, and phone to submit additional documentation to clarify the inconsistencies.

The deadline to submit this documentation is Friday, September 5.

Failure to meet this deadline can result in loss of health care coverage. It can also affect any premium tax credits or cost-sharing assistance you were qualified for.

Therefore, we are helping spread the word within our communities to ensure that every consumer has fair notice and is able to take appropriate action. There are several ways to ensure you or a loved one maintains health care coverage in the Marketplace:

  • Through the Marketplace online account: Log in to your account and select your application. Click on Application Details on the menu located on the left side of your screen. On the next screen you will see a list of “inconsistencies”, which you can resolve one-by-one by uploading the solicited document. [Please be sure to not use the following characters in the name of the files uploaded: / \ : * ? “ < > |.]
  • Through the Marketplace toll-free number: You can verify if the documents you submitted were received or get your questions answered by calling the Marketplace Call Center at 1-800-318-2596. When you call, tell the representative you received a “data matching warning notice.” [TTY users should call 1-855-889-4325.]
  • Through local certified Navigators in your community: There are many local organizations who are state and federally certified to assist Marketplace customers, such as the NHCOA Navigators, which provide assistance in Miami-Dade County, Florida and Dallas County, Texas, particularly among monolingual Hispanics. Use Find Local Help to identify local navigators in your area for one-on-one, in-person assistance.

Additional Resources

HealthCare.Gov blog

Healthcare.Gov Twitter [English]

CuidadodeSalud.Gov Twitter [Spanish]

For Spanish language assistance in Miami-Dade County, Florida and Dallas County, Texas, click here.

Post by Diana Moschos, the Senior Communications Associate for the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Vaccinations are not just for kids

Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of NHCOA

Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of NHCOA

August is National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM), and when it comes to vaccines, it’s important to keep in mind that immunizations are not just for kids – we all need to get vaccinated at different points throughout our lifetimes. That is why it is important for older adults to know what vaccines they may need, where they are administered, and receive encouragement from their trusted health care providers and loved ones to get immunized.

The fact is that the existence of vaccines is the one of the reasons we are able to live longer, healthier lives. Diseases that used to be deadly are now preventable, and NIAM presents an opportunity to highlight the value of immunization across one’s lifespan.

As one of several DEC founding members dedicated to improving the lives of our diverse seniors across the country, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) knows that keeping up with the CDC-recommended vaccination schedule is a key part of staying healthy for all older Americans. Therefore, in commemoration of NIAM, here are five reasons why older Americans should get vaccinated:

1. Vaccines are not just for kids.

Vaccines are an important part of a person’s preventive care at all stages of life, not just childhood.

2. Vaccines are an important step in protecting adults against serious, often deadly diseases.

While it may not seem to make sense, the truth is that vaccinations are necessary throughout childhood and beyond. Every year the CDC issues vaccine recommendations based on the latest research on vaccine safety, effectiveness and patterns of vaccine-preventable diseases.

[Click here to see the 2014 CDC adult vaccination schedule by age group. A Spanish version is available as well.]

3. Vaccines can protect older adults from serious and sometimes deadly diseases.

The CDC recommends older adults get vaccinated to prevent serious diseases such as the flu (influenza), shingles, pneumonia, hepatitis and whooping cough. Many of these diseases are common in the United States and therefore all adults— especially diverse elders—can benefit from immunization.

There are also vaccines that prevent cancer, such as the hepatitis B vaccine. The vaccine prevents chronic hepatitis B, which in turn prevents liver cancer.

The reality is that avoiding vaccinations results in the needless hospitalizations of thousands adults in the U.S., and in the worst of cases, death. However, perhaps the most important function of vaccines is to prevent the spread of certain diseases among those who are most vulnerable to serious complications, which includes diverse seniors.

[Click here to find out which vaccinations are covered by Medicare.]
[The new ACA Health Insurance Marketplace plans cover vaccinations as free preventive services with no copay or coinsurance charges]

4. Most adults have probably not received all the immunizations they need to stay healthy.

The rates of adult immunizations among older adults aren’t as high as they should be, exposing them and their loved ones to preventable diseases. And, although many older adults may consider immunizations to be important, many may be unaware that they need to get vaccinated as well, which is why health care professionals play an important role in informing their patients about the need to get immunized. Seniors should also talk to their health care providers about which vaccines are best for them given their specific health situation.

[Click here to find out your closest vaccination provider]

5. Vaccines are safe.

All vaccines are thoroughly tested before being released to the general public to ensure they are safe for use. While vaccines do have side effects, they are usually minor and temporary. It is possible for some people to have allergic reactions to certain vaccines, but serious and long-term effects are rare.

The week of August 24-30 is dedicated to raising vaccination awareness among adults, including diverse seniors. NHCOA is a proud partner of the CDC in helping inform and raise awareness about getting vaccinated among Hispanic older adults, their families, and caregivers through its signature immunizations program, Vacunémonos (Let’s Get Vaccinated). Vacunémonos is a culturally, linguistically, and age sensitive community intervention that aims at increasing adult vaccination rates among Hispanics. For more information, please visit www.nhcoa.org.

Additional Resources

NHCOA Vacunémonos Pinterest Board [Bilingual]
NHCOA Vacunémonos Immunization Brochure [Spanish]

Posted by Maria Eugenia Hernandez-Lane, Vice President of the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Salud y Bienestar: Helping Latino Seniors and Families Prevent and Manage Diabetes

Obesity is a foothold for chronic diseases, such as diabetes, posing a particularly serious health challenge for all diverse communities, including Hispanic older adults. Sadly, the number of Latino diabetics increases with age: one out of three Hispanic older adults suffer from the disease, which is often accompanied by related complications such as kidney disease, amputations, heart disease, high blood pressure, and nerve damage. While factors such as obesity predispose Latinos to diabetes, there are also myriad cultural, educational, linguistic, financial, and institutional barriers that keep Hispanics from being diagnosed in the first place. In fact, two of out every seven diabetics in the United States are undiagnosed. This is poses a significant health threat and challenge not only among families, but also in the realm of public health. Read More

Medicare and Medicaid at 49: Keeping the Generations-Old Promise Alive

While the concept of national health insurance was developed in the early 20th century, President Harry S. Truman elevated the issue during his Administration:

“Millions of our citizens do not now have a full measure of opportunity to achieve and to enjoy good health. Millions do not now have protection or security against the economic effects of sickness. And the time has now arrived for action to help them attain that opportunity and to help them get that protection.”

Twenty years later, his vision was brought to life under President Lyndon B. Johnson with the Social Security Amendments of 1965, which provided millions of older Americans and low-income families with access to healthcare through the Medicare and Medicaid programs. At the time, health insurance wasn’t attainable for older Americans, especially those living in poverty, because of their age and chronic conditions. Private insurance was also out-of-range for low-income families. By providing our most vulnerable populations with health insurance access, over the decades, Medicare has become a game-changer, especially for diverse seniors. The bottom line is that: without it, many diverse elders would have to assume their healthcare expenses, accrue substantial debt, and most likely not receive the care they need. Today, 49 years later, the Medicare and Medicaid programs have continued to fulfill their promise to all of our generations, allowing seniors and families to have access to the quality healthcare they deserve and otherwise, wouldn’t be able to afford.

Medicare

Thanks to the Affordable Care Act, the life and solvency of Medicare has been extended with expanded benefits and savings for its beneficiaries. Since the ACA was enacted, over 8.2 million beneficiaries have saved $11.5 billion on prescription drugs, an average of $1,407 per person. The ACA is also successfully closing the “donut hole,” a gap in coverage in which beneficiaries pay the full cost of their prescriptions out-of-pocket, before catastrophic coverage for prescriptions takes effect. Beneficiaries affected by the “donut hole” will receive savings and discounts on brand-name and generic drugs that gradually increase each year until the gap is closed in 2020.

The use of preventive services among Medicare beneficiaries has also increased thanks to the ACA. The elimination of coinsurance payments and the Part B deductible for recommended preventive services, such as cancer screenings, has allowed more beneficiaries to take control of their health by preventing and monitoring health conditions as well as detect health problems in early stages.

Medicaid

Medicaid also provides health insurance for more than 4.6 million low-income older Americans, the majority of whom are concurrently enrolled in Medicare. Medicaid also covers nearly 4 million people with disabilities who are also enrolled in Medicare. This population of “dual eligibles”— those who are enrolled in Medicare and Medicaid— represents 17% all Medicaid enrollees. When the ACA was passed, states were required to expand Medicaid coverage to bring more low-income folks under the insured tent. However, the Supreme Court later ruled it voluntary, which has resulted in states “opting out” of expansion. Due to this, there are seniors whose incomes are too high to qualify for Medicaid under the current rules, yet too low to qualify for help purchasing coverage through the Marketplace.

A Birthday Wish for Medicare and Medicaid

As advocates for diverse elders across the country, our birthday wish for Medicare and Medicaid is two-fold: for these social insurance programs to be protected for future generations, and for the states which “opted out” of Medicaid expansion to reverse their decisions. However, for this birthday wish to come true, it will require less gridlock and resistance and more consensus and bipartisanship. It will require less rhetoric and more action. It will require our communities to speak up and speak out on behalf of those who benefit from these programs, and those who could.

Today, July 30, join the millions of seniors and families Medicare and Medicaid serve each year in wishing these programs a happy birthday. And, here’s to many more!

Take Action

 

Dr. Yanira Cruz is the President and CEO of the National Hispanic Council on Aging. The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of the Diverse Elders Coalition.

Hepatitis, HIV and Older Americans: Get the Facts and Take Action

Diana Moschos - picBy Diana Moschos

World Hepatitis Day is one of four official disease-specific world health days

While viral hepatitis is the 8th leading cause of death in the world, it is a largely silent killer. Each year, the disease kills approximately 1.5 million people worldwide. In the United States, the CDC estimates 4.4 million people live with chronic hepatitis. However, most are unaware they are infected. Four years ago the World Health Organization designated July 28 as World Hepatitis Day to raise awareness and encourage action, especially among vulnerable and high-risk populations, including older Americans. Viral hepatitis is a life-threatening disease on its own, but often times it can be present along with other life-threatening infections, such as HIV. Read More

The Growing, Neglected Challenges of LGBT Latino Elders

Latino elders who are lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) face additional challenges as they age, compounded by barriers rooted in their racial and ethnic identities, as well as LGBT stigma and discrimination. Yet the attention and infrastructure to ameliorate these conditions is generally lacking. That’s the overarching conclusion reached by the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) in a first-ever national needs assessment examining the social, economic and political realities of a growing, though multiply marginalized, population.

NCHOA’s report speaks to a timely moment. Demographics project a significant increase in Latino people and older people over the next few decades, trends rooted largely in immigration and the aging of the Baby Boom generation, respectively. For example, the U.S. Census estimates that the number of Latino people age 60 and older will sky-rocket from 4.3 million in 2010 to 22.6 million in 2050. And as societal attitudes and policy changes have made it easier for some segments of the LGBT population to “come out” and live openly, LGBT older people have become increasingly visible in both the aging and long-term care system, as well as society at large. Read More

Health Benefits of Pet Ownership for Older Adults (National Minority Health Month)

In recognition of National Minority Health Month, the Diverse Elders Coalition is featuring stories relevant to the health disparities and health issues affecting diverse older adults during April. A new story will be shared every Wednesday with additional posts shared throughout the month. Be sure to visit diverseelders.org regularly during the month of April.

April is National Minority Health Month, and the theme for this year is “Prevention is Power: Taking Action for Health Equity.” There are a lot of things diverse older adults can do to prevent serious health problems. Eating a healthy diet, exercising, and having regular checkups from a health care provider can all help prevent serious health issues. Pet ownership can also help improve the health of older adults. For those who are able, walking a dog or just caring for a pet can provide exercise and companionship. Unlike dieting, exercising, and visiting health care providers, however, pet ownership does not require a high level of health literacy. Read More

Aging in America 2014: Health Reform Advocacy and Engagement in Communities of Color and LGBT Communities

Will you be joining the 3,000 engaged aging professionals and experts March 11-15, 2014 in Sunny San Diego for the ASA Aging in America 2014 conference?

Interested in exploring best practices and learning about successful advocacy and engagement tactics to better engage older adults of color and lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) elders around the Affordable Care Act and their health?

Yes? Join us Friday March 14, 2014 from 1-2:30pm for a presentation entitled Health Reform Advocacy and Engagement in Communities of Color and LGBT Communities. Leading experts from our nation’s diverse aging organizations will be on hand to share lessons learned, opportunities and challenges within their communities in accessing the benefits of the Affordable Care Act and living full and healthy lives. Speakers include: Read More

In Their Own Words: a Needs Assessment of Hispanic LGBT Older Adults

LGTB Report Launch-01

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) – the leading national organization working to improve the lives of Hispanic older adults, their families, and caregivers, in partnership with Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) – today released the report of its national study on the status of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) Hispanic older adults during a press conference on at The SAGE Center in New York, NY. The study, entitled In Their Own Words: a Needs Assessment of Hispanic LGBT Older Adults, was conducted by NHCOA, with financial support from the Arcus Foundation, and is released in collaboration with Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE) and the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC). Both NHCOA and SAGE are founding members of the DEC. Read More

As Parents Age, Asian-Americans Struggle to Obey a Cultural Code

This article by Tanzina Vega originally appeared in the New York Times

Savan Mok, a home health aide, assisting Oun Oy, 90, right, who had a stroke in 2012. Ms. Oy is from Cambodia and lives in Jenkintown, Pa., with her son and his wife, at rear. Jessica Kourkounis for The New York Times

Savan Mok, a home health aide, assisting Oun Oy, 90, right, who had a stroke in 2012. Ms. Oy is from Cambodia and lives in Jenkintown, Pa., with her son and his wife, at rear. Jessica Kourkounis for The New York Times

SOUDERTON, Pa. — Two thick blankets wrapped in a cloth tie lay near a pillow on the red leather sofa in Phuong Lu’s living room. Doanh Nguyen, Ms. Lu’s 81-year-old mother, had prepared the blankets for a trip she wanted to take. “She’s ready to go to Vietnam,” Ms. Lu said.

But Ms. Nguyen would not be leaving. The doors were locked from the inside to prevent her from going anywhere — not into the snow that had coated the ground that day outside Ms. Lu’s suburban Philadelphia home, and certainly not to her home country, Vietnam. Read More

ACA: Vital to Diverse Older Adults – Don’t Be Left Out

With the start of the New Year, people across the country started coverage on insurance plans selected through the Health Insurance Marketplace. For racially and ethnically diverse and LGBT older adults, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and the Marketplace pose both the opportunity for better health and the challenge of possibly being left behind by a new program. The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) is now working to improve the health of the populations that it serves and to empower them to fully participate in the ACA.

A recent article by Kaiser Health News identifies some of the opportunities and challenges California’s Hispanic population face. The article highlights the tremendous help the Health Insurance Marketplace has been to Maria Garcia, who worked with a community health center to enroll herself and her husband in an insurance policy costing $36 per month after subsidies. The article also describes the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate enrollment assistance. Many Hispanic older adults enrolling in the Marketplace like to enroll with the help of a person that they trust. Health Care Navigators can also help diverse older adults overcome barriers such as lower levels of internet connected home computers and fear of putting personal information online. Read More

Don’t Be Left Behind: Accessibility and Mobility Challenges in an Aging Society

At the start of October, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) held a Capitol Hill advocacy day as part of its 2013 NHCOA National Summit. During the advocacy day, groups of seniors met with members of Congressional staff and told them about the lives of Hispanic older adults and the issues they faced in their communities. The staff members and Congressional offices were happy to meet with the older adults and gave them a warm welcome. Overall, everyone that took part in the event agreed that it is important to all people to have access to their elected officials.

As the advocacy day continued, walking from office to office in Capitol Hill became difficult for the seniors. While the people we met with were accessible, the places themselves were not. Many of the seniors taking part in the advocacy struggled with physical limitations to their mobility, and the distances between Congressional offices posed a challenge. As the population of older adults increases as a percentage of the population, the places where we live and work will have to adapt.

Older women with a walker unable to access stairs from the Equal Rights Center’s “Visitability” Quiz

Older woman with a walker unable to access stairs from the Equal Rights Center’s “Visitability” Quiz

Read More

Webinar Recording: Why the Affordable Care Act Matters to Diverse Older People

The health coverage expansions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect you, your loved ones and your communities. The Diverse Elders Coalition represents millions of diverse older people age 50+ who are among those affected: they include the Health Insurance Marketplace, the Medicaid expansion, new benefits for elders 65+ on Medicare, and a range of protections that make health care more accessible for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older people and older people of color. The number of uninsured older adults age 50-64 continues to rise—from 3.7 million in 2000 to 8.9 million in 2010. In addition, people of color make up more than half of uninsured people in the U.S.— and research shows that people of color, across the age span, face significant disparities in physical and mental health. Additionally, many people of color delay care because of potential medical costs and out of fear of discrimination or cultural incompetence from medical providers. This webinar highlights both national and state-specific examples on what is being done to ensure that older people know about the changes that are taking place under the ACA and how it affects them.

Speakers: Yanira Cruz, President and CEO, National Hispanic Council on Aging; Michael Adams, Executive Director, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE). Special thanks to our co-sponsors, The John A. Hartford Foundation and The California Wellness Foundation.

Original Webinar date: Wednesday, November 6, 2013.

Watch it at http://www.screencast.com/t/yzeTQbgEze2.

Reminder: One Month Left in Medicare Open Enrollment

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Medicare Open Enrollment is the time of year when beneficiaries can change their Medicare health plan and prescription drug coverage for the following year. Each year Medicare Open Enrollment runs from October 15-December 7. The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) encourages you to consider reviewing your Medicare drug or health care plan, and/or assist your loved ones in reviewing theirs. You can use the materials provided in NHCOA’s Medicare Open Enrollment toolkit to assist you in reviewing your options in order to find the coverage that best meets your needs. However, if you and your loved ones are satisfied with your current health plan, no action or change is required.

Medicare is health insurance for people 65 years or older. The U.S. Federal government provides this health care service from revenue collected through payroll taxes. If you’ve paid into Social Security and Medicare for 10 years as an employee, you are most likely eligible for Medicare benefits.

Following the three C’s is a good criterion to keep in mind when reviewing your current plan and making the decision whether or not to make changes. Read More

WEBINAR: Why Obamacare/the Affordable Care Act Matters to Older People of Color and LGBT Older People

When: Wednesday, November 6, 2013 2-3pm EST
Register Now: http://bit.ly/1c0l5zd
Speakers: Dr. Yanira Cruz, President and CEO, National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA)
Michael Adams, Executive Director, Services and Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE)
Who can attend? Advocates. Policy makers. Older Adults. Funders. Anyone interested in learning more about Obamacare and how it affects diverse older people. *There will also be additional information for funders on how they can support both national and state-specific work.

First 30 Minutes: Conversation with Dr. Cruz and Michael Adams about why Obamacare/the Affordable Care Act Matters to diverse older people. Learn about the opportunities, challenges and lessons learned.
Second Half of the Conversation: Dr. Cruz and Michael Adams will take your questions.

WEBINAR DESCRIPTION
The health coverage expansions under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will affect you, your loved ones and your communities. The Diverse Elders Coalition represents millions of diverse older people age 50+ who are among those affected by these expansions. They include the Health Insurance Marketplace, the Medicaid expansion, new benefits for elders 65+ on Medicare, and a range of protections that make health care more accessible for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) older people and older people of color. The number of uninsured older adults age 50-64 continues to rise—from 3.7 million in 2000 to 8.9 million in 2010. In addition, people of color make up more than half of the uninsured people in the U.S.— and research shows that people of color, across the age span, face significant disparities in physical and mental health. Additionally, many people of color delay care because of potential medical costs and out of fear of discrimination or cultural incompetence from medical providers. These issues are especially true for LGBT people of color who face challenges on multiple aspects of their identities. The ACA has the ability to create a path to better health by offering more affordable health insurance options, improving services and eliminating the usual obstacles. This webinar will highlight both national and state-specific examples of what is being done to ensure that older people know about the changes that are taking place under the ACA and how it affects them.

This webinar is in collaboration with Grantmakers in Aging (GIA) as part of their “Conversation with GIA” series.

Special thanks to our co-sponsors, The John A. Hartford Foundation and The California Wellness Foundation.

Health Exchange Open Enrollment Cannot Come Soon Enough

According to the latest American Community Survey, about 30% of Hispanics lack health insurance. Medicare provides nearly universal coverage, however, so the vast majority of uninsured Hispanics are age 65 and under. In fact, about 35% of Hispanics between the ages of 45 and 54, about 42% between 35 and 44, about 48% between 25 and 34, and about 47% between ages 18 and 24 lack health insurance. Despite making up 16% of the population, Hispanics represent 33% of the nation’s uninsured. Open enrollment for the ACA’s Health Insurance Marketplaces starts October 1st and cannot come soon enough for the Hispanic population.

Health and economic security in old age are not determined solely after one turns 65. Having health insurance and the access to the care that it provides has a strong influence on health throughout life. In addition to the health benefits, having health insurance allows people to become familiar with the health care system, to develop health literacy, and to work with health care providers to develop healthy habits. For many Hispanics, Medicare is the first health insurance policy in which they ever enroll. This coverage often comes decades too late, as small health issues, left untreated for years, can grow into major complications.

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) and the Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) are eager to support enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplaces. NHCOA and the DEC will conduct culturally and linguistically appropriate outreach to the populations that we represent in order to help them purchase affordable health insurance. NHCOA will begin targeted outreach soon, but Latinos interested in learning more about purchasing affordable health insurance can go to cuidaddesalud.gov or contact the National Hispanic Council on Aging at 202-347-9733.

National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day

September 18 marks the annual National HIV/AIDS and Aging Awareness Day, a day to shine a spotlight on HIV/AIDS and its impact on the aging body. The Diverse Elders Coalition and our member organizations know well that this disease greatly affects our nation’s older people. In fact, adults 50 years of age and older make up the fastest growing population with HIV, and by 2015, more than half of Americans living with HIV/AIDS will be over 50.

While individuals with HIV/AIDS are living longer lives, older adults have more than three other (usually chronic) health conditions in addition to HIV versus their age peers without HIV. As a result, they have a host of health and services needs that neither HIV nor aging services providers are fully prepared to meet. Yet older adults have rarely been targeted in HIV/AIDS prevention and awareness campaigns. As a result, many do not realize that their behaviors can put them at risk for HIV infection. Additionally, health care providers may mistakenly assume that older patients are no longer engaged in high risk behaviors, and therefore do no initiate conversation about the importance of using protection and getting tested regularly.

This is why representatives from our member organizations SAGE (Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders) and NHCOA (National Hispanic Council on Aging) are at Capitol Hill today for a briefing, reception and hearing to highlight the needs and challenges of older adults with and at risk for HIV. You can follow what happened and get live updates by following @nhcoa and @sageusa on Twitter. Read More

HHS awards $67 million to Navigators and recognizes the DEC member organizations as Champions for Coverage

According to a news release from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Secretary Kathleen Sebelius today announced $67 million in grant awards to 105 Navigator grant applicants in Federally-facilitated and State Partnership Marketplaces. These Navigator grantees and their staff will serve as an in-person resource for Americans who want additional assistance in shopping for and enrolling in plans in the Health Insurance Marketplace beginning this fall. Also today, HHS recognized more than 100 national organizations and businesses who have volunteered to help Americans learn about the health care coverage available in the Marketplace.  Read the full release here.

The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) is pleased to announce that its member organizations, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA), Services & Advocacy for GLBT Elders (SAGE), and the National Asian Pacific Center on Aging (NAPCA) were among those organizations recognized as a Champion for Coverage. These champions pitch in to help consumers understand the coming options for quality, affordable coverage. The DEC will officially be recognized as a Champion for Coverage in the coming weeks. Click here to learn more about organizations participating in Champions for Coverage.

The coalition also congratulates NHCOA who were among the 106 Navigator awardees. NHCOA will deploy Navigators in Dade County, Florida, and Dallas County, Texas, to enroll the uninsured Hispanic population in these two counties with a focus on members of this population that are socially isolated due to cultural and linguistic differences. Click here for a list of Navigator awardees or more information about Navigators and other in-person assisters.

Be sure to continue coming back to diverseelders.org to stay updated on the health insurance marketplaces and their impact on diverse elders.

Language, Idioma, 語, ភាសា: Speaking limited English can pose unique challenges for older people

Map of people that speak Spanish at home.  Source: Badger, Emily, “Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don’t Speak English at Home,” The Atlantic Cities

Map of people that speak Spanish at home. Source: Badger, Emily, “Where 60 Million People in the U.S. Don’t Speak English at Home,” The Atlantic Cities

According to the Census Bureau, about 20% of people speak a language other than English at home. That’s 1 in 5 people! And over the years, this number has only grown. The Census Bureau has developed a map that shows in which parts of the country these people live. What the map shows is that there are people whose preferred language is not English in all but the most sparsely populated parts of the country. Language access is a civil right, and these rights are reflected in federal law. It is also becoming more common to see instructions on packages, advertisements, and other messages translated into languages other than English, as well. When it comes to language access, the policies of the United States promote inclusion.

Despite these efforts at inclusion, accessing many government programs poses unique challenges for older adults with limited English speaking ability. Programs like Medicare Part D (the prescription medication program) and the Affordable Care Act’s health exchanges rely on consumers to choose the plans that will balance value and health coverage. However, there are multiple studies from the implementation of Medicare Part D that state consumers do not choose the most economically efficient options. Most people, particularly those who prefer to speak in a language other than English, could benefit from learning more about their health care options. Read More

Why Getting Online Matters for Diverse Older Adults

Who doesn’t have a smart phone these days? Mobile technology is one of the fastest growing of the new technologies out there. And for many young and middle aged adults, it seems like the laptop is the technology of “yesteryear.” Yet many older adults, especially those over 65, may not own or know how to operate a computer. There’s a large divide between who is “plugged” in and who is not.

Across racial and ethnic groups, young people are more likely to use new technologies than older adults.  For example, even though Hispanic households with middle- and high incomes have high rates of internet usages, older Hispanics are far less likely to use the internet.  Overall, just 35% of Hispanics aged 65 and over own a computer, compared to over 70% of Hispanics overall.

We know diverse older adults endure economic insecurity, hunger, health inequities, and isolation.  We also know that any one of these issues can make life difficult in general.  Is the digital divide not something to be as concerned about?  It is.  The internet is a tool that can also offer solutions. The details of issues like economic insecurity and hunger are not frequently discussed and not well known among those that have not experienced it for themselves. However, the internet (specifically social media) is one way for older adults to expose their shared experiences to a larger audience.  It also allows older adults to escape isolation by finding community online and staying connected to friends and family, even if many miles away.   Read More

Addressing the Needs of LGBT Hispanic Older Adults in the U.S

Two Older LGBT Hispanic men at a SAGE 2011 health fair

Two Older LGBT Hispanic men at a SAGE 2011 health fair

With the rapid growth of our diverse population, our country is becoming more beautiful than ever. But unfortunately, there are still some groups that are not well understood by the nation’s service providers, or by local, state and federal governments. One of those groups is lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) older adults. And in order to better understand the reality of this diverse community, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) conducted an analysis through a literature review, focus groups (one was held at The SAGE Center; SAGE is fellow member organization of the Diverse Elders Coalition) and in-depth interviews with LGBT Hispanic older adults, including the service providers who work with them. Read More

StoryCorps: A Transgender Woman’s Journey from Hiding to “Walking in Love”

Alexis Martinez (left) worried that coming out to daughter Lesley as transgender would mean giving up any relationship with her grandchildren. But she needn't have worried.

Alexis Martinez (left) worried that coming out to daughter Lesley as transgender would mean giving up any relationship with her grandchildren. But she needn’t have worried.

Alexis Martinez grew up in a rough neighborhood on Chicago’s South Side in the early 1960s. She knew she was transgender from an early age.Alexis (whose birth name is Arthur) struggled with her identity, as did her family. At 13, she came out as transgender to her mother. Alexis’ mother called the police, who laughed and told her, “You’ve got a fag for a son, and there’s nothing we can do about it.”

As a result, Alexis joined a gang and “went as macho as [she] could be, to mask what [she] really was underneath.”

Alexis has a daughter, who accepts her for who she is. Says her daughter Lesley: “You don’t have to apologize. You don’t have to tiptoe. We’re not going to cut you off. And that is something that I’ve always wanted you to, you know, just know—that you’re loved.” Read More

Alzheimer’s Disease Among Hispanic Older Adults

Over the past several months, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) has conducted focus groups to learn about what Hispanic older adults and caregivers know about Alzheimer’s disease (AD).  We found that people have a wide variety of beliefs about what causes the condition and how to prevent it.  We also heard the insights of caregivers for people with AD.  While there is no known cure or prevention measure for AD, caregivers can pass on advice and teach other caregivers how to cope with the stress of providing care.

 “I would have her tested to be able to help her better, and have a better life for me and all of those who live at home.”

“The doctor told me that she didn’t have Alzheimer’s-she said, who was I to tell her that? After examining her, the doctor admitted that she had early signs of Alzheimer’s.”

“For those of us who love our family members, I believe we have to give them a hand, take them to a doctor, have tests done-because in its early stages, maybe life is better for those who take care of them.” Read More

Immigration Reform: Key Issues for Older Adults and People with Disabilities

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) works with many organizations advocating for immigration reform.  However, not many advocates are considering the effect reform could have on older adults.  I am happy that NHCOA was able to partner with the National Council on Aging and Caring Across Generations to develop the issue brief Immigration Reform: Key Issues for Older Adults and People with Disabilities.  Aging advocates have a large role to play in immigration reform and this resource will help inform them on the varying issues faced by older people and people with disabilities.

Read the full issue brief here.

And don’t forget to come back on Wednesday April 10, right here on diverseelders.org as NHCOA’s president Dr. Yanira Cruz will blog about Immigration Reform and Politics in an Aging America.

A Gay Son and His Dad: “Why I am an Aging Advocate”

How my dad supported his gay son

There was a time in my life, around 11 years old, when I often skipped school because I was being bullied and harassed. It was obvious to my classmates that I was “different” and they targeted me because of it.  At lunch, there was a boys table and a girls table, but I was relegated to the “other” table.

I hated waking up for school. Sometimes I would put my head over the toaster to create a “fever” and ask my mother if I could stay home. Sometimes it worked. Sometimes it didn’t.  Those days that it didn’t, I would put on my uniform, grab my lunch and deliberately slam the front door to our apartment. The loud noise signified to my parents that I was on my way to school.

What I really did was tip toe back to my bedroom and hide in the closet. Inside, I would carefully listen for my family to leave for the day. Once they were gone, I would breathe a huge sigh of relief as it meant I could turn on the TV and relax—I was free from my bullies!

One Monday, the school administration called my mother to inquire why I hadn’t been attending. It just so happened my father was home that day and my mother demanded that he check to see if I was there.  As he called my name, my heart was pounding and I put my hand over my mouth to hide my breath as I hid in the closet. Read More

Recognizing Older Latinas During Women’s History Month

March is National Women’s History Month. Recognizing the contributions older Latinas make is important, but it does not happen often enough in our society. The Hispanic older women that the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) works with encourage others to contribute to their communities and provide inspiration for those looking for the right way to give. The theme for this year’s Women’s History Month is “Inspiring Innovation Through Imagination,” and the community leaders that NHCOA has trained live this theme on a daily basis.

Over the last several years, NHCOA has conducted Empowerment and Civic Engagement Training (ECET) and developed over 800 community leaders, the vast majority of them older adult women. Read More

The Re-launch is here!

Two weeks ago, we announced that we would be re-launching the Diverse Elders Coalition Blog.  Read here to find out more.

We are thrilled that this day has finally come. As we previously promised, in addition to our regular contributing bloggers, we will have exciting guest bloggers.  We will also display our content in a variety of different ways (e.g., pictures, videos, interviews, Top 5 columns, etc.) And much more! Have a suggestion? Contact us.

You can bookmark this page or subscribe to our RSS feed to stay updated. Check back on Wednesday to read our latest post, courtesy of National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA). Until then, enjoy some highlights from the blog’s history:

1) Watch Our Story

2) The Unique Needs of Asian American and Pacific Islander Elders

3) 10 Considerations for Working with the Diversity of Older LGBT Latinos

We are Re-launching On March 18!

The Diverse Elders Coalition (DEC) was founded in 2010, and in July 2012 we launched our official website, which also serves as a news and commentary blog on the social, political and economic issues affecting the growing yet vulnerable demographic of elders who are Black, Hispanic, Asian/Pacific Islander, American Indian/Alaska Native, and lesbian, gay, bisexual and/or transgender (LGBT).In the last eight months, we have put out numerous posts on the issues that affect our communities and the creative ideas and best practices to address them. In the summer of 2012, we also released Securing Our Future: Advancing Economic Security for Diverse Elders, a resource that describes the issues facing elders of color and LGBT elders, who together will represent a majority of older adults in the United States by 2050.

In this time, we have received some wonderful comments on our work, as well as helpful feedback from our readers (all of you) on how to improve the site to better meet your needs—and we listened to you. Members of the Diverse Elders Coalition came together and crafted an exciting plan for moving forward by implementing many of your ideas, which you’ll see starting with our blog re-launch on March 18.  Here are some of the improvements to look forward to:

  • In addition to our regular contributing bloggers, we have some exciting guest bloggers scheduled!
  • Content displayed in a variety of ways (e.g., pictures, videos, interviews, Top 5 columns, etc.)
  • More news and original content from coalition members
  • And more!

 

As we look forward to March 18, please like us (and tell a friend!) on Facebook to stay updated on the events surrounding the launch and the latest news affecting diverse elders. If you have any questions about DEC or would like to submit an idea for a blog post, please contact us.

See you on the 18th!

To learn more about DEC members, click here.

Leaves That Pay

As policy makers gather to discuss the impending fiscal cliff, they will consider many ways to reduce budget deficits and the national debt. This discussion includes the future of health care. Rather than cutting benefits, one of the best ways to lower health care costs is to invest in workers’ health through policies that allow them to take paid time off in event of an illness or to look after a loved one who is sick.

That is why NHCOA has been working across states to raise awareness and empower Latino workers and older adults to advocate for leaves that pay laws at the local and state level. Leaves that pay policies are the best way to ensure that workers don’t have to choose between their family and their job. Job security and steady wages are crucial for the Hispanic community as many workers are also caregivers and heads of households. Read More

Introducing the ‘Improving Services and Activities for Diverse Elders Act’

There are many services and supports for older adults available at no cost. Things like home delivered meals, transportation services, and benefits counseling all help older adults live in their own homes and communities and age in dignity. The Older Americans Act (OAA) is the law that provides these services and supports and creates the nation’s infrastructure for aging. It is an invaluable law that helps millions of people each year. Despite the law’s successes and importance, it faces deep budget cuts and is becoming outdated. Read More

Latino Seniors Describe their Needs

This summer, the National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) has been traveling to key regions of the country to host its Promoting Communities of Success Regional Meetings.  These meetings allow NHCOA to hear the needs and perspectives of Hispanic older adults, their families, and caregivers and also to empower them to become more civically engaged.

Newspaper articles print grim economic statistics, but in order to learn the true human cost of these numbers, we must listen to real individuals and hear their background and perspective. This information is key in aligning daily needs with meaningful policy solutions. Three common themes we picked up at the Dallas and Miami regional meetings were: (1) Hispanic older adults are still recovering from the economic downturn of 2008, (2) they are uneasy about the future, and (3) despite their fears and concerns, they are eager to be a part of the solution.

Read More

Empowering Diverse Older Americans to Become Civically Engaged

“[NHCOA is] multiplying leadership through us. If these thirty some people trained today can reach at least two people, in one or two weeks we will double. And, in few more weeks, they will train others and we will multiply again, and so forth.” – Maria Teresa Guzman, Empowerment and Civic Engagement Trainings (ECET)  

When civic engagement comes to mind, we may think of youth mobilization and empowerment. Although engaging our younger generations is crucial, it is equally as important to empower older voters. Yet as the growth of the older American population quickly outpaces that of youth, we see certain segments of this population becoming increasingly isolated.

That is why we need to ensure the voice of older Americans—especially diverse elders— is elevated at the decision-making table when it comes to public policies that can dramatically impact their lives.

The National Hispanic Council on Aging (NHCOA) is conducting its signature Empowerment and Civic Engagement Trainings (ECET) throughout key regions of the country to energize, mobilize, and empower Hispanic older adults, families, and caregivers to be their own best advocates.

Read More